FEATURES | MUSIC | BOOKS | DRINKS | FORUMS | GAMES | LINKS | ABOUT


advertise on Tiki Central

Celebrating classic and modern Polynesian Pop
  [Edit Profile]  [Edit Preferences]  [Search] [Sign Up]
[Personal Messages]  [Member List]  [Help/FAQ]  [Rules]  [Login]
Tiki Central Forums » » Creating Tiki » » Tiki Carving » » Aaron’s New Akua (Done!)
Goto page ( Previous Page 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 Next Page )
Aaron’s New Akua (Done!)
Polynesiac
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 29, 2004
Posts: 2083
From: San Pedro, CA
Posted: 2004-09-03 7:48 pm   Permalink

Hey aaron How's everything?
Octane - thanks for sharing your techniques. It's interesting to see how everyone does it. For what it's worth, aaron, this is what I do:
I put on at least 2 coats of stain with a foam brush. I've found that applying stain with a regular brush misses many of the spots between the palm fibers and applying stain with a rag raises more fibers. which is annoying. I apply a "liberal" amount (enough to cover and seep - but not enough to drip) then immediately wip off what I just applied with a clean white rag (I use old t-shirts). Check out wood working websites for other techniques.
For my palm tikis, I've found that applying polyurethane or varnish with brushes takes FOREVER. especially when you have to apply several coats. I started using the spray version of these sealers. you have to put a ton of coats (I put anywhere between 5-10 coats depending on where the tiki is going to live) on for the same effect, but it does save time applying the coats. It also seeps into the crevices that are hard to get to with a brush. for all other wood, I still apply with a brush, because the end result on redwood (for example) looks better when applied by brush, but I don't see any difference with palm.

I love that design of the Moai-Kuish one. Can't wait to see it in full 3d aac form.
_________________

OMG! I'm on Instagram!


 View Profile of Polynesiac Send a personal message to Polynesiac  Email Polynesiac Goto the website of Polynesiac     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Aaron's Akua
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 09, 2004
Posts: 1594
From: Rancho Santa Margarita, CA
Posted: 2004-09-07 4:07 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2004-09-03 19:48, Polynesiac wrote:

For what it's worth, aaron, this is what I do... ...I love that design of the Moai-Kuish one. Can't wait to see it in full 3d aac form.




Hey Jim, thanks for weighing in. And "for what it's worth"....
I love hearing from anybody & everybody. Different experience, viewpoints, opinions...it's all good! I'm still kicking a few ideas around for how I'm going to finish this.

I looked at some abalone over the weekend, but it may be tough to get a large enough piece to do the inlay that I want. I'm a little concerned about the toxic shell dust with the little one running around. Also, the shell is curved but the large piece for the ear inlays want to be flat. I will either put together several pieces like a mosaic or maybe look into cutting some slate tile or other natural flat material with some nice natural color & texture.

I got lots of carving done over the weekend, so I'll try to post some new progress pics later in the week (don't have the camera card reader here at home).

I can't wait to start on the Moai-Ku guy. How is your tiki work going? Are you making good use of those AAC blocks that we traded?

Thanks for posting. I'll definitely review all of the stain & finish tips from you and Octane when I get to that stage. Great information!

_________________

+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

"Ah, good taste! What a dreadful thing! Taste is the enemy of creativeness."
-Pablo Picasso

[ This Message was edited by: Aaron's Akua on 2004-09-07 16:12 ]


 
View Profile of Aaron's Akua Send a personal message to Aaron's Akua      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
rodeotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 21, 2004
Posts: 1513
From: calgary
Posted: 2004-09-07 6:12 pm   Permalink

I cant wait to see the next one, I love reading your post and comments. So much info from such cool people. Watching the progress of you and others makes me want to progress more.
_________________


 
View Profile of rodeotiki Send a personal message to rodeotiki      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
freddiefreelance
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Feb 15, 2003
Posts: 2995
From: San Diego, Ca.
Posted: 2004-09-07 6:22 pm   Permalink

Have you looked at Luthier supply stores Abalone inlays? Stewart MacDonald & Internation Luthiers Supply are 2 good companies to check out for Guitar making supplys.

_________________
Rev. Dr. Frederick J. Freelance, Ph.D., D.F.S

[ This Message was edited by: freddiefreelance on 2004-09-07 18:28 ]


 View Profile of freddiefreelance Send a personal message to freddiefreelance      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Aaron's Akua
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 09, 2004
Posts: 1594
From: Rancho Santa Margarita, CA
Posted: 2004-09-07 11:51 pm   Permalink

ABALONE DUST IS VERY, VERY, BAD!
+++++++++++++++++++++++
I did a little checking on the web for info on this. I put together a few quotes on abalone dust fom various sources on-line, just in case anyone "scanned over" the info from Octane on this. I don't want any TC members to develop impaired breathing because of something I suggested.
-----------------------
"at least one pearl supplier that I know of has been so overexposed to the fine dust that results from grinding the shell that he has been seriously ill with silicosis, a potentially fatal lung disease--if you grind shell or cut lots of inlay, wear an OSHA-approved respirator. Even if you cut only a little inlay, wear at least a dust mask such as the fiber units sold in hardware stores, and it's a good idea to wear goggles too"
-----------------------
"I used to market abalone mabe pearls and would sometimes trim them to size. I was cautioned by my pearl grower/cutter to not only work them wet, but wear a respirator and not have my skin exposed to the dust during this process. He had developed an irregular heart beat from exposure to the dust and was educated by an expert on how to protect himself. The noxious substance can apparently be inhaled as well as absorbed through the skin. The dust contains a glucamite, a chemical which the body mistakes for sugar and thus transports readily within ones tissues"
-----------------------
"The shell is really easy to work with as long as you remember these simple rules;
(1) Don't breathe in the dust, In Simple Terms -The dust has barbs like a fishhook and will cause serious damage to your lungs. Always wear a mask! and have suction. The same applies to Abalone Shells also.
(2) Do not work the shell wet to avoid Chlorine Poisoning through the Skin and Lungs and think about others if they are in a room with you- It is possible to poison them and not you.The same applies to Abalone Shells also."
-----------------------
"What's so about abalone shell and being worked is this: If it is worked dry, it makes a nauseating smell which is bad enough by itself, but the real danger comes from the dust which is not poisonous per se, but it is like inhaling window pane shards and it lacerates the lungs. The answer to both problems is to make sure that you work it wet, either by a drip system, common in all lapidary setups, or by constant dunking if using regular power tools such as a Dremel or a belt sander. KEEP IT WET!"
-----------------------
"Having worked with abalone before, first I will warn of the dangers! The dust from the shell is toxic and will make you ill, It also causes a lung disease. Anyway cut under water, use a strong suction device, ar wear an Osha approved mask. I cannot say enough about the saftey factor!"
-----------------------
Now, these are a little contradictory, because several of them say to work the shell wet, while another says specifically not to use water because of possible "chorine poisoning". Bottom line is - research this subject well before working with abalone inlay!
+++++++++++++++++++++++

Rodeotiki,
I'm glad you are enjoying this. For myself, I'm just having fun with it. And I'm not really sure at this point how it will wind up. I really enjoyed your progress post, so I thought I'd start my own. The suspense is great!
++++++++++++++++++++++

Freddie,
Thanks for the research. I checked both links out, & I'm still looking around. The trouble with most of these guitar builder type sources is the odd and/or small sizes of the abalone. And it may be a bit pricey. There's a place in Seal Beach called the California Seashell Co. I'm gonna go down there & take a look. As with any natural irregular material, It's kind of hard to buy on-line. You're never quite sure what you're gonna get. Thanks for the good info, Freddie!
_________________

"Ah, good taste! What a dreadful thing! Taste is the enemy of creativeness."
-Pablo Picasso


 
View Profile of Aaron's Akua Send a personal message to Aaron's Akua      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
cheekytiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 09, 2004
Posts: 1091
From: The Haole Hut, London, UK
Posted: 2004-09-08 01:15 am   Permalink

Thats right Aaron, Abalone shell is as bad if not worse than Asbestos, glad yor'e still enjoying the carving so much, lookin forward to seeing more!
_________________

www.cheekytiki.com
http://cheekytikiuk.blogspot.com/


"Don't drink water, fish f*~k in it" W.C. Feilds


 View Profile of cheekytiki Send a personal message to cheekytiki  Email cheekytiki Goto the website of cheekytiki     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Aaron's Akua
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 09, 2004
Posts: 1594
From: Rancho Santa Margarita, CA
Posted: 2004-09-08 11:14 pm   Permalink

Here's more progress over LABOR DAY weekend (thanks for the correction, TNTiki!)
-------------------------





++++++++++++++++++++++++

It probably doesn't look a whole lot different than the first pics, but believe me there's a whole lot less wood there now. The rough-in is pretty much done, so it should be all chisels, rifflers & sandpaper from here on out.

I'm still kicking the shell inlay idea around. I went to a shell shop & looked at some abalone & other stuff today, and I'm still not really sure how to get started cutting the shells. This thing might take a slightly different direction....

More pics to follow as I'm able.

_________________

+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

"Ah, good taste! What a dreadful thing! Taste is the enemy of creativeness."
-Pablo Picasso

[ This Message was edited by: Aaron's Akua on 2004-09-09 22:05 ]

[ This Message was edited by: Aaron's Akua on 2004-09-09 22:50 ]


 
View Profile of Aaron's Akua Send a personal message to Aaron's Akua      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
rodeotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 21, 2004
Posts: 1513
From: calgary
Posted: 2004-09-08 11:17 pm   Permalink

what did you use tool wise to get to that point. looks good ,please keep us other newbies posted. the info sure helps


 
View Profile of rodeotiki Send a personal message to rodeotiki      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
cheekytiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 09, 2004
Posts: 1091
From: The Haole Hut, London, UK
Posted: 2004-09-09 01:19 am   Permalink

Aaron the tiki's lookin good. You can cut and carve Abalone shell very easily with a Dremel.

_________________

www.cheekytiki.com
http://cheekytikiuk.blogspot.com/


"Don't drink water, fish f*~k in it" W.C. Feilds


 View Profile of cheekytiki Send a personal message to cheekytiki  Email cheekytiki Goto the website of cheekytiki     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
TNTiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 15, 2004
Posts: 464
From: Knoxville, TN
Posted: 2004-09-09 3:29 pm   Permalink



[ This Message was edited by: TNTiki on 2004-11-06 16:18 ]


 
View Profile of TNTiki Send a personal message to TNTiki  Email TNTiki     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Chongolio
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Oct 02, 2002
Posts: 2765
From: The Coast of Kauai
Posted: 2004-09-09 8:31 pm   Permalink

Alright AA, Lookin good! Personally I dont think it needs the shells. Jes my two coconuts. Thanks for the pics and getting a very informative thread running
.
Here is a staining/ finishing thread that was started. that I cross referenced to this post:

http://www.tikiroom.com/tikicentral/bb/viewtopic.php?topic=9111&forum=7

You guys may want to add the info you shared to it.

Keep them chisels hummin'

Chongolio


_________________
-- I believe that our Heavenly Father invented the monkey because he was disappointed in man."
... Mark Twain

Come explore www.lost-isle.com

[ This Message was edited by: Chongolio on 2004-09-11 19:41 ]


 View Profile of Chongolio Send a personal message to Chongolio  Email Chongolio Goto the website of Chongolio     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Aaron's Akua
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 09, 2004
Posts: 1594
From: Rancho Santa Margarita, CA
Posted: 2004-09-11 6:44 pm   Permalink

ON JASCO:
+++++++++++++++++++++
Hi all,
I lifted this quote from 8FT Tiki's post, because it is really informative & also answers one of my questions from the first page of this string. Hope you don't mind, 8FT!

Quote:

On 2004-09-11 00:40, 8FT Tiki wrote:
Thanks Aaron. The Jasco product that I am using is not oily but rather is a liquid as thin as water. It absorbs quickly into dry wood. I hope that it will protect my carvings which are outside in the elements. It does darken the tone of the wood quite a bit though and gives it a sort of dark rusty look. Not a problem if you are going to follow it with a dark stain but I wouldn't recommend it if you want the finished project to be a lighter color. The wood just needs to dry for a day after applying JASCO. Then you can apply a stain or sealer. JASCO is available at Lowes and I think it is about $7.00 for a quart. Comes in a plastic container that looks like a bottle of auto antifreeze in shape but quite a bit smaller. One container lasted me for 2 carvings. Hope this helps.




+++++++++++++++++++++

Rodeotiki: I used chisels only to start with. I soon grew frustrated, and my supportive wife was kind enough to purchase for me a Dremel Flexshaft kit which was a vast improvement. I had to buy a Dremel wood carving bit because although the kit comes with about 70 accessories, none of them are the slightest bit useful for wood carving. I ran these bits at way too high RPM's & burnt through 2 of them before Benzart set me on the right path. I now know that the ONLY kind of bits worth buying are the Tungsten Carbide bits, which pretty much last forever. Or at least I've had no problems so far. The package for the bit will list the max RPM's for the bit.

Now, as soon as you get comfortable with the carving and pretty much know how much and where the wood needs to come off, the Dremel starts feeling a little too small. As Benzart put it "It's like cleaning your garage floor with a toothbrush." The rough out is pretty much complete for this tiki, but the next one I do will be with a new set of pneumatic tools that I just acquired (too late for this tiki). The rest of the work on this one will be with small Flexcut palm tools, files, rifflers, and sandpaper. I may pick up a conical sanding bit for the Dremel or the Pneumatics.
+++++++++++++++++++++

Cheeky: I think I'm giving up on the shells, at least for this project. I picked up some really nice bright blue porcelain tile with varying tones that I'm planning to inlay into the ears and eyes. I'll cut the tile with a dremel diamond bit. I'll post some pics on this process as I go. hopefully I'll get some tiki carving time tomorrow afternoon.

I'm still going to attempt the 2-tone stain by doing the dark areas first & leaving the light areas natural, then apply the polyurethane when everything looks nice. If I screw up & some of the stain bleeds over, I'll just stain the whole thing dark & call it a 1-tone. Tikifreak Gary PM'd me with some tips on the 2-tone. I'll post his comments here if he lets me know that it's O.K. w/ him (it was a PM after all).
+++++++++++++++++++++

TNTiki: Thanks for the correction. Long weekends really mess me up!
+++++++++++++++++++++

Chongolio: The shells are out but the inlay is still in. Hopefully it won't be too much, but I wanted to take my time with this one & maybe do something that's unique and different from all the other great tiki styles here on TC. We'll see when it's done!

I figured a play-by-play thread from a new carver like me would be helpful for the other new guys or maybe even a few lurkers that are thinking about starting, but don't know how. I'm sure there's a few out there. This way everone will learn from my mistakes as I go! Thanks for the PM. Hope to see you at TC SoCal events in the future.

That other thread is great. Thanks for the cross-referencing.
+++++++++++++++++++++

Mahalo All,

A-A
_________________

"Ah, good taste! What a dreadful thing! Taste is the enemy of creativeness."
-Pablo Picasso


 
View Profile of Aaron's Akua Send a personal message to Aaron's Akua      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Aaron's Akua
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 09, 2004
Posts: 1594
From: Rancho Santa Margarita, CA
Posted: 2004-09-12 1:37 pm   Permalink

NEED HELP!
+++++++++++++++++++++

Okay, I had this great idea to idea to pick up some nice tile to use for inlay on the ears & eyes for my tiki. I looked around at a few places. Since I wanted a really bright blue color, one of the tile places suggested
That I go to a pool tile supply house. Since I only wanted one square foot of tile, the place just gave them to me as a sample.
-----------------------------------



Nice color, huh?



I really like this tile, because of the different shades of blue running through it. I think it will make the eyes really pop next to a nice dark brown stain.



I bought a rotozip tile cutter bit, used a template to do the outline for the ears with grease pencil, & clamped it down to some plywood.



Not easy. Less than a minute in I slipped & got a nice scratch across the surface. I quickly found the tile bit to be worthless. Plan B: I switched to a carbide bit, which worked only slightly better, then started to get hot really quick.



Plan C: Switched to some diamond bits. The packaged said they would work at 30,000 RPM & cut everything, including Tungsten Carbide steel! These lasted about one minute, then all of the “diamonds” ground off the end and they became worthless.



This is as far as I got with my brilliant idea. This is the smaller circular piece for the top part of the easter island ears. I packed up the tools for the day & decided to lean on you guys for suggestions.
++++++++++++++++++++

I really love this tile, & I haven’t given up on it yet. There must be a better easier way to cut it than with the Dremel or at least with the bits that I tried so far.

ANY IDEAS? I NEED SOME HELP HERE!


_________________

+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

"Ah, good taste! What a dreadful thing! Taste is the enemy of creativeness."
-Pablo Picasso

[ This Message was edited by: Aaron's Akua on 2004-09-12 13:40 ]


 
View Profile of Aaron's Akua Send a personal message to Aaron's Akua      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Kono
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Oct 08, 2003
Posts: 1266
From: Orlando
Posted: 2004-09-12 6:02 pm   Permalink

I tried using diamond bits to drill through glass and I ate through several bits in just a few minutes. Of course, they were "flea market" dremel bits so I'm sure they were of inferior quality. Anyway...this is the best dremel bit I've ever used. You could burrow to the center of the Earth with this sucker. You said you used a carbide bit but not sure if it's the same one. It's a little more expensive (like $12-$15) but you can usually find it at your local Home Depot. They make other shapes of the structured tooth tungsten carbide cutters but I had to order them online.

 View Profile of Kono Send a personal message to Kono  Email Kono Goto the website of Kono     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Octane
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 23, 2003
Posts: 316
From: SLO California
Posted: 2004-09-12 9:01 pm   Permalink

it looks like you are trying to use the bits and drill down then trace out the pattern, instead use the tile cutter and start from the edge of the tile and cut into the tile then just cut over to your shape and cut it out. thats all the help i can add. This should stop it from slipping. I'm not sure the tile cutter is ment to drill through the tile and then cut, but i have never used the tile cutter on tile either.

[ This Message was edited by: Octane on 2004-09-12 21:03 ]


 
View Profile of Octane Send a personal message to Octane      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Goto page ( Previous Page 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 Next Page )
U-Moderate:
  
v1.5

[ About Tiki Central | Contact Tiki Central | Advertise on Tiki Central ]
(c) 2000-2014 Tikiroom.com (tm), Tiki Central (tm)

Credits & copyright infomation