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walmart spirit of aloha
TikiGardener
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 24, 2002
Posts: 1361
From: 1st website dedicated to Tiki Gardens
Posted: 2004-10-23 09:30 am   Permalink

http://edition.cnn.com/2004/US/10/14/hawaii.walmart.ap/index.html

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/041013/480/hilp10110132146

More proof they are pure evil, they built a store on top of an ancient Hawaiian burial ground.

TG



[ This Message was edited by: TikiGardener on 2004-10-23 09:31 ]


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thedivas
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: May 01, 2004
Posts: 42
From: Silver Lake, CA
Posted: 2004-10-23 10:08 am   Permalink

i am proud to say i have never shopped at a Wal-Mart, and i never will!

 
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Tiki Royale
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Dec 06, 2002
Posts: 891
From: The Aloha Room in Beautiful Belmont, CA!
Posted: 2004-10-23 11:56 am   Permalink

"placing them in an air-conditioned, darkened trailer"
It sounds like they're heading out to the Paradise Cove Luau!
Seriously bad mana.

Aloha,


 
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lanikai
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 15, 2004
Posts: 490
From: Hawaii
Posted: 2004-10-23 3:08 pm   Permalink

Sprawlmart is intent to decimate the competition as well as ancient cultures all around the world:

"Wal-Mart at Mexico Ruins Sparks Protest... residents of an ancient Mexican city protested on Saturday at the construction of a Wal-Mart store on the edge of the ruins. A Teotihuacan pyramid, the archeological site 18 miles from Mexico City.

The sprawling warehouse-style Bodega Aurrera, a unit of Wal-Mart in Mexico, is due to open in December in Teotihuacan, a major archeological site outside Mexico City.

(an area that certainly has their own versions of fabulous tikis...)

Opponents say it will ruin a way of life that dates back centuries. "What they are doing in Teotihuacan is destroying Mexico's deepest roots for short-term interests like lower prices," "This is the flag of conquest by global interests, the symbol of the destruction of our culture."
The Teotihuacan construction site lies less than a mile from the gated tourist park housing the main ruins and is visible from atop the Pyramid of the Sun that has defined the skyline for 2,000 years.

(this may have been covered over in Aztecentral.com)

of course, walmart continues to lie to us and say:

"(issues) now raised against Wal-Mart are simply inaccurate and unfair. From the beginning, we have been committed to ensuring that the final treatment of remains is done in a culturally appropriate, respectful and sensitive manner. We are certainly willing to work with recognized descendants to discuss how to accelerate the process of reburial, obviously, in a way that is appropriate and consistent with recognized practices and beliefs."

and yet, talk with any group here in Hawaii concerned with the safe, respectful care and local repatriation of ancestral remains and they will tell you Walmart simply cares about only one thing.

almost as the Bush/Kerry split, the "walmart destroying the local culture" subject is a very divisive issue here.


 
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thebaxdog
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 19, 2002
Posts: 775
From: Santa Ana, CA.
Posted: 2004-10-23 8:39 pm   Permalink

I bought two Aloha shirts from the Walmart in Kauai
The Tiki section there rocks.
I hope they build one closer to my house.
I love to go over and have lunch with Gingy
Yum Yum popcorn, hot dog and hot ginger bread action
_________________
When this stops being fun
It's our fault
Have no brakes Cannot stop
Happydog (What can I do?)


 
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Tiki Rider
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Oct 05, 2002
Posts: 497
From: South Orange County, CA
Posted: 2004-10-23 9:42 pm   Permalink

Hey Bax They got one by me. Its huge. Theres a Mcdonalds inside too. I always grab a double cheeseburger and coke before I fill up my cart. I havent seen any ginger bread though.

 
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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11137
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2004-10-24 3:24 pm   Permalink

You know, I actually was relieved to leave Germany in the 80s, because I am a totally apolitical personality. I was annoyed by the constant heightend awareness of political correctness, and inspired to mock it, because it seemed so selfrighteous. Part of the fun of Tiki for me lay in it's political incorrectness.
But lately, things have been going a little too far in the direction of proud ignorance. I understand that there is a loyalty to ones favourite sports team that makes one root for them even if they suck. It's kinda cool. But this here is not sports, it's your goddamn life and that of your children, and to go ahead and be in denial even when the wrongs to basic human values are so apparent just baffles my mind.


 
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NeptuneTiki
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Sep 13, 2003
Posts: 63
From: Neptune Beach, Florida
Posted: 2004-10-24 3:55 pm   Permalink

Walmart is out for Walmart. I really wonder what will happen to the remains.

Walmart makes tons of promices, but fails to keep them when the media leaves the scene. In Mobile, AL. Walmart promiced as part of the agreement with the city, to keep 300 year old oaks surrounding the property there. After one year, they decided Walmart was not being viewed well enough for the impulse shopper, so they chopped them down and paid the fine. Did they care that these beautiful oaks have been ther 300 years, NO! Walmart is scary! Not the Halloween scary either!


 
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thebaxdog
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 19, 2002
Posts: 775
From: Santa Ana, CA.
Posted: 2004-10-24 4:44 pm   Permalink

Please call me when the next anti-Walmart rally starts so we can all stand side by side, instead of just talking about it ?
_________________
When this stops being fun
It's our fault
Have no brakes Cannot stop
Happydog (What can I do?)


 
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Tiki Rider
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Oct 05, 2002
Posts: 497
From: South Orange County, CA
Posted: 2004-10-24 6:03 pm   Permalink

so is Sam's Club off limits too?

4,400 hawaiian residents are gainfully employed and thousands shop there. Isnt that good for the State of Hawaii's economy and employment rates?

Bigbro...your apolitcal?, If I'm not mistaken didnt you post something last year comparing President Bush to Hitler? I think there was a photo with the post.


 
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christiki295
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 09, 2003
Posts: 3813
From: LA-2547 mls east Hawaii &5500 Easter Is
Posted: 2004-10-24 6:52 pm   Permalink

In reference to the Walmary opening Craig Nishida, of UFCW Local 480, stated that a big box store would adversely impact the smaller local businesses. Walmart profits made in Hawaii will typically be spent on the Mainland instead of going back into Hawaii's economy.

In Los Angeles the prospect of Walmart Superstores fueled a multimonth supermarket strike, in part, because of Walmart's non-union, low wage employment practices.


 
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christiki295
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 09, 2003
Posts: 3813
From: LA-2547 mls east Hawaii &5500 Easter Is
Posted: 2004-10-24 7:02 pm   Permalink

Quote:

[i]On 2004-10-24 18:03, Tiki Rider wrote:

4,400 hawaiian residents are gainfully employed and thousands shop there. Isnt that good for the State of Hawaii's economy and employment rates?




TikiRider,

It appears that Wallmart failed to address senstive cultural issues, which is in keeping with its reputation of using its size as America's largest employer to get its way.

I do agree with you that any additional employment in Hawaii is worthwhile. However, Wallmart pays lower then the average retailer and is not a very good corporate citizen, according to this US News & World Report article:

Wal-Mart takes hits on worker treatment
By Stephanie Armour USA TODAY

There's more to Wal-Mart than bare-bones pricing and a familiar yellow smiling face. The megaretailer is also getting an unwelcome reputation for the way it treats its employees.

At the pinnacle of its success, the company is fending off critics who say Wal-Mart discriminates against women, underpays workers and uses illegal tactics to kill unionization efforts. Never before has the retail empire, founded in 1962, come under such blistering attack.

Roughly 40 lawsuits have been filed by employees who say they were forced to work overtime for no pay. The company is facing a sexual discrimination lawsuit in California that could become the largest such case in history.

And labor groups, which have fought unsuccessfully for years to get a foothold at Wal-Mart, are intensifying efforts. In November, more than 100 rallies captured headlines. Critics want higher wages for workers and support for unionization efforts.

For Wal-Mart — whose 1.3 million workers make it the world's largest private employer — both reputation and money are at stake. Overtime and sexual bias lawsuits could cost the company millions of dollars; similar class-action cases involving overtime claims at other companies have brought verdicts as high as $90 million.

The blows to Wal-Mart's image are coming just as the company lays out some ambitious goals — expanding into the $680 billion retail grocery business and hiring more than 1 million employees in the next five years.

Company officials say they don't know why the attacks are coming now, and they also say the allegations are unfounded. "It's our approach with our associates to treat them right and have a genuine partnership with them," says Wal-Mart spokesman Bill Wertz. "We need a lot of people to conduct our business and fill our existing stores. We couldn't do that if we mistreated our people."

Some Wal-Mart employees agree the flap about labor problems is overblown.

"We have a great package of benefits," says Micheal Hardaway, 37, a store manager in Los Angeles. "Wal-Mart gives people the tools to better themselves. Associates have a voice."

Test of organized labor

But this is about more than Wal-Mart. The battle to reform the company's employment practices is also a crucial test for organized labor, whose membership has atrophied from 30% of the labor force in the 1950s to about 13% today. So far, none of Wal-Mart's roughly 1 million U.S. employees are union members — raising tough questions about how relevant unions are today.

"Unionizing a giant, New Economy employer like Wal-Mart would be as big a coup today as unionizing Ford was to the United Auto Workers," says Erik Gordon, a professor at the University of Florida in Gainesville. "Failing to unionize it is frustrating to the unions and damages their claim that they're needed by today's workers."

Critics want to keep the pressure on because they believe changes in Wal-Mart's labor practices could prompt competitors to make similar concessions. And change, they say, is sorely needed.

"I'd love to see the benefits package changed," says Mary Lou Wagoner, 53, a cashier in Las Vegas at Sam's Club, a wholesale warehouse operated by Wal-Mart. "People can't afford it. A union would help immensely."

But Wal-Mart is fighting back. Company leaders say unionization efforts have failed because its employees are content. How, they ask, could the company continue to grow — it now has 3,371 stores — if it was really such an inhospitable place to work?

Officials at the Bentonville, Ark., home office say Wal-Mart offers competitive wages and affordable health insurance. As an example of the company's commitment to its workers, officials note that more than 60% of Wal-Mart's managers began as hourly employees.

Unions and analysts put hourly pay for non-supervisors at about $8; Wal-Mart declined to divulge salary information. The 1999 annual average hourly earnings for retail workers was $9.08, according to data from the Labor Department analyzed by the International Council of Shopping Centers.

"The question our people have is what the unions' real intent is. It doesn't seem like a genuine membership drive," Wertz says. "It seems like more of an effort to discredit the company and protect those companies that do employ union members."

Adds Ted Connelly, 36, a department manager at a Wal-Mart store in Ocala, Fla: "I never expected the opportunities that are here at this store. The one company that would not need a union is Wal-Mart."

Competitors that have some unionized workers include grocers Kroger, Albertsons, Safeway and Royal Ahold, union officials say.

But the anti-Wal-Mart campaign is spreading. Some allegations:

•Union busting. Since November 2001, Wal-Mart has been a defendant in 28 complaints brought by the National Labor Relations Board citing anti-union activities such as threats, interrogations or disciplining.

Critics say Wal-Mart moves quickly to block organizing. In 2000, a majority of meat cutters at a store in Jacksonville, Texas, voted to organize. Shortly after the vote, the company closed its butcher departments at Jacksonville and other stores. Organizers say that was done to quash the union; Wal-Mart says it was part of a long-term business plan to move to prepackaged meats.

•Sexual discrimination. A lawsuit filed in San Francisco claims Wal-Mart discriminates against women in promotions, job assignments, training and pay. The lawsuit, filed in June 2001, allows for claims going back to December 1998 — potentially involving hundreds of thousands of current and former Wal-Mart employees if certified as a class action.

Stephanie Odle, 31, of Norman, Okla., is a class member in the case. She says women were paid less and treated differently. Odle says she learned that a male manager with less experience was earning $20,000 more a year. But when she complained, Odle says, she was told that the man was raising children and was the sole financial support for the family.

"They have a blatant disregard &ellipsis; they can't continue to treat people that way," Odle says.

Lawyers and activists say that more than 70% of Wal-Mart's sales associates are women, while less than a third of store management employees are female. Company officials declined to divulge statistics due to pending litigation.

•Employment practices. Critics contend that Wal-Mart is profiting at the expense of workers' benefits and wages.

Two-thirds of workers don't have health insurance because they can't afford it or don't qualify, according to the United Food and Commercial Workers Union (UFCW) — a statistic Wal-Mart disputes. Employee pay averages about 30% less than union members in the retail food industry, they say. And the company is also facing lawsuits from workers who say they were made to work off the clock, in some cases claiming they were locked in stores. This year, Wal-Mart lost the first of those overtime lawsuits to go to trial — a case involving employees in Oregon. Damages have not yet been determined.

"Wal-Mart has a crummy health plan, it's very expensive, and every year, premiums go up," says Linda Gruen, 53, of Federal Way, Wash. The former Sam's Club cashier quit in August and became a union organizer. "We need to do something."

To demonstrate that their campaign is making a difference, labor groups point out that Wal-Mart was not among Fortune magazine's list of the top 100 companies to work for. The company was on the list in 1998, 2000 and 2001.

"Clearly, the pressure is having an impact. They fell off," says Jill Cashen at the UFCW.

But company officials say they weren't shunned. Rather, they say, Wal-Mart this year chose not to participate in the annual ranking, which is based in part on employee surveys.

Wal-Mart's benefits

To counter union attacks, Wal-Mart officials say that about 75% of employees are eligible for health care coverage. (The remaining 25% are in waiting periods, which are six months for full-time employees and two years for part time.) Of those eligible for the health plan, about 60% sign up.

The company picks up two-thirds of the cost. While unions say that's less than some other companies, Wal-Mart points out that the majority of its employees are full time, so more are eligible for coverage. They also say the coverage might cost more, but it's more comprehensive, and there are no caps on benefits.

Other perks include a profit-sharing plan and a 401(k) plan that the company contributes to even if the associate does not. The company contributes an amount, up to 2% of employees' pay, depending on profitability. There is also a store bonus program. Employees in stores that meet specific criteria, such as profitability and customer satisfaction, share in yearly profits.

But as the finger-pointing escalates, some labor experts say unions might be targeting Wal-Mart because they see the company's growth as a threat.

Labor has "unionized stores like Safeway and Kroger," says Satish Deshpande, a management professor at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo. "But those organizations are now asking the union for wage and benefit cuts because they say they can't compete with Wal-Mart, whose labor costs are so much lower. So their only option is to go after Wal-Mart."

For critics, getting the message out has become a coordinated campaign with professional anti-Wal-Mart videos and Web sites, such as
www.walmartwatch.com and www.walmartyrs.com. The National Organization for Women in September named the company its fifth National Merchant of Shame over labor issues.

Some say such attention is overdue. Gretchen Adams, 56, is a former Wal-Mart supervisor. Women used to come to her office in tears, she says, because they couldn't survive on company wages.

"It's terrible what they do to people," says Adams, of Navarre, Fla., who quit in 2001 and became a union organizer. "I had women who would come to me worried about how to make ends meet because they couldn't afford the health care. For a company that is the nation's largest, how can they let that go on?"


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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11137
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2004-10-24 7:18 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2004-10-24 18:03, Tiki Rider wrote:
Bigbro...your apolitcal?, If I'm not mistaken didnt you post something last year comparing President Bush to Hitler? I think there was a photo with the post.



Quote:

On 2004-10-24 15:24, bigbrotiki wrote:
But lately, things have been going a little too far in the direction of proud ignorance. I understand that there is a loyalty to ones favourite sports team that makes one root for them even if they suck. It's kinda cool. But this here is not sports, it's your goddamn life and that of your children, and to go ahead and be in denial even when the wrongs to basic human values are so apparent just baffles my mind.



 
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suicide_sam
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 26, 2002
Posts: 670
From: LBC
Posted: 2004-10-24 7:38 pm   Permalink

The only part I'll chime in on is the Wallmart being put on a Hawaiian burial gorund, wethetr it employs people or is hopworthy or not, I'll leave that to you guys. I was fortunate enough to get to visit Italy this year. I went through allot of cities in Northern Italy and saw places that wer a thousand years old. One of teh memories that is the most deeply burned into my mind after my return is the vast amount of McDonalds. Everywhere you look there was a McDonalds. I went to this city on toip of a mountain that was over a thousand years old. The place was gorgeous. As you are coming up the front gates that are the only way in or out what is sitting right outside to the left of teh gate? Thats right a McDonalds.

I bring this up because I think we should have a ceratin amount of respect for some things, wether its' architecture or places with spiritual relevance. It's fine that we want the conveniance of having an easy to shop at place or fast food on every corner, but I think we are really robbing ourselevs in teh long run if that is all that we have, Wallmarts and McDonalds. If the Wallmart would emplot lots of people and the communitty wanted it then fine, just put it somewhere else.


 
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Tiki Rider
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Oct 05, 2002
Posts: 497
From: South Orange County, CA
Posted: 2004-10-24 8:44 pm   Permalink

You all got some points...but I dont see anyone being forced to shop or forced to work for the evil Walmart. They filled 800 some jobs and had crowds surging in to shop. From reading everything though it appears the majority of the people are in favor of it being there and shopping there.
By the way who owned the walmart land originaly? They sold the burial ground to walmart. Shouldnt they be at fault too?
Any large company union or not can have the same charges leveled at them. Low wages payed to women is universal and valid complaint. Thats a known fact that women earn less than men. Unions want their foot in the door anywhere. sexually harrassment can happen in any workplace.


and bigbro..judging from your response quote then I take it that was your post comparing President Bush to Hitler.



 
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