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Tiki Central Forums Bilge The Dead Thread
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The Dead Thread
martiki
Official Mixologist

Joined: Mar 29, 2002
Posts: 3058
From: http://www.smugglerscovesf.com
Posted: 2006-01-30 10:48 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2006-01-24 21:31, johntiki wrote:
LOS ANGELES, California (AP) -- Actor Chris Penn, brother of Sean Penn, was found dead Tuesday at a condominium near the beach in Santa Monica, police said.

http://www.cnn.com/2006/SHOWBIZ/Movies/01/24/chris.penn.obit.ap/index.html?section=cnn_latest




OK- get ready for the CREEPY part of the story! I haven't even told Mike this yet:

As you may have heard, he died a day before his new film was set to premiere at Sundance. That film is called The Darwin Awards, based on the popular website that tracks the fates of people who make stupid decisions.

There is a scene in that film with Chris Penn, and fellow stars Winona Ryder and Joseph Fiennes.

The scene is filmed in a bar.


That bar is located at... 1304 Lincoln Ave. Alameda, CA. This may ring a bell to some readers of this website....


That's right: Chris Penn filmed his last scene at the future home of FORBIDDEN ISLAND!!!!!!

NO SHIT!


Is this a bad omen? I'm not sure. But Metallica is also in this film, and they do like their tiki. I think we need a set of those bobbleheads...

Isn't that weird?




 
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paranoid123
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Dec 13, 2002
Posts: 377
From: New York City
Posted: 2006-01-31 09:59 am   Permalink

Coretta Scott King died last night at age 78. She was known as the wife of Dr Martin Luther King Jr. but was a very important woman in her own right.

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/31/national/31cnd-coretta.html

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thejab
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 2986
From: Tradewinds Apartments, Alameda, CA
Posted: 2006-01-31 11:25 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2006-01-30 22:48, martiki wrote:
Quote:

On 2006-01-24 21:31, johntiki wrote:
LOS ANGELES, California (AP) -- Actor Chris Penn, brother of Sean Penn, was found dead Tuesday at a condominium near the beach in Santa Monica, police said.

http://www.cnn.com/2006/SHOWBIZ/Movies/01/24/chris.penn.obit.ap/index.html?section=cnn_latest




OK- get ready for the CREEPY part of the story! I haven't even told Mike this yet:

As you may have heard, he died a day before his new film was set to premiere at Sundance. That film is called The Darwin Awards, based on the popular website that tracks the fates of people who make stupid decisions.

There is a scene in that film with Chris Penn, and fellow stars Winona Ryder and Joseph Fiennes.

The scene is filmed in a bar.


That bar is located at... 1304 Lincoln Ave. Alameda, CA. This may ring a bell to some readers of this website....


That's right: Chris Penn filmed his last scene at the future home of FORBIDDEN ISLAND!!!!!!

NO SHIT!


Is this a bad omen? I'm not sure. But Metallica is also in this film, and they do like their tiki. I think we need a set of those bobbleheads...

Isn't that weird?






Really weird!

Furthermore, several TC members saw Sean Penn interviewed onstage at the SF Film Noir Festival the Saturday before Chris' death. The interviewer was Eddie Muller, who lives in ..... Alameda! Weird? I guess not.


 
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cynfulcynner
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 24, 2002
Posts: 1800
From: Ocean Beach, San Francisco
Posted: 2006-01-31 11:51 pm   Permalink

Wendy Wasserstein -- prizewinning playwright
- Steven Winn, Chronicle Arts and Culture Critic
Tuesday, January 31, 2006

Wendy Wasserstein, the celebrated playwright who limned the humanity, humor, societal pressures, surface details and vexing inner conflicts of women in America for nearly three decades, died of lymphoma Monday in New York City. She was 55.

Her widely produced plays, beginning with "Uncommon Women and Others" in 1977 and including "The Heidi Chronicles" (1989), "The Sisters Rosensweig" (1993) and "An American Daughter" (1997), sprang from keen observation of contemporary behavior, mores, sensibilities and current events. Collectively, they form an unrivaled theatrical portrait of American life transformed by the feminist movement and its exhilarating, complicated aftermath. Her most heralded work, "The Heidi Chronicles," won the Pulitzer Prize and a Tony Award for best play on Broadway.

Ms. Wasserstein wrote about sex and career, money and children, ambition and ambivalence among college-educated, predominantly middle-class characters who aged along with the playwright over the course of her career. Her accessible, deftly structured comedies played on Broadway, off Broadway and in regional theaters around the country.

She was also a screenwriter, novelist, essayist, opera librettist and children's book author. Locally, the Peninsula company TheatreWorks produced her plays over the years.

"She was America's leading female playwright for over two decades," said Robert Kelley, artistic director of TheatreWorks. "Her dramatic comedies are a history of the changes that women have experienced in contemporary America. She also had a brilliant instinct for capturing American society in both its foibles and its potential."

Sensitively produced, as many of her plays were by TheatreWorks and as "The Sisters Rosensweig" was by the San Jose Repertory Theatre in 1996, a Wasserstein work revealed the writer's flair for simultaneously entertaining an audience, engaging its sympathies, and provoking thought about social conventions. The semi-autobiographical "Sisters" will be revived in April by TheatreWorks, which is dedicating the production to the playwright's memory.

Gregarious, gently self-mocking and big-hearted, Ms. Wasserstein was a fixture in the New York theatrical community.

"Wendy is an ebullient, sly, extravagantly gifted and wise woman," the actress Meryl Streep said in a 1997 "LIVE!" interview. "She is comforting and endlessly available to her friends, who are therefore endlessly needy as the space allows."

Andre Bishop, the Lincoln Center Theater director who was also a close friend, told the Associated Press yesterday that Ms. Wasserstein was "an extraordinary human being whose work and life were extremely intertwined. She was not unlike the heroines of most of her plays -- a strong-minded, independent, serious good person."

She was born in 1950, and raised in a well-to-do middle-class Jewish family in Brooklyn and Manhattan. "It's hard when you're funny to be taken seriously," she told The Chronicle in a 2001 interview. "Since I was the youngest in a large family, the way I got by was being funny. Not ha-ha funny, like Nathan Lane, but by using humor to stand back a little."

Ms. Wasserstein attended Mount Holyoke College, the source and setting of "Uncommon Women and Others," her first major play. Written as Ms. Wasserstein's graduate thesis at the Yale School of Drama, it aired on PBS in 1978.

With "Isn't It Romantic?" in 1983 and "The Heidi Chronicles" six years later, the playwright charted the course of her heroines through the thickets of love, career and premonitions of motherhood. "An American Daughter," set in the Clinton era, deals with a woman's nomination as U.S. Surgeon General and a subsequent media scandal. "Old Money" (2000) satirizes the old and newly rich.

Ms. Wasserstein's many other writing credits include the forthcoming novel "Elements of Style," the screenplay for "The Object of My Affection," the children's book "Pamela's First Musical" and a 2001 adaptation of "The Merry Widow" for San Francisco Opera. Last year, she published a short book in praise of "Sloth."

In 1999, at age 48, Ms. Wasserstein gave birth as a single mother to a daughter, Lucy Jane. In addition to her daughter, she is survived by her mother, Lola Wasserstein; a sister, Georgette Levis; and two brothers, Abner and Bruce Wasserstein.

Chronicle wire services contributed to this story.

URL:
http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2006/01/31/BAGMIH02N31.DTL
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cynfulcynner
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 24, 2002
Posts: 1800
From: Ocean Beach, San Francisco
Posted: 2006-01-31 11:53 pm   Permalink

Video Artist Nam June Paik Dies at 74
- By LAURA WIDES-MUNOZ, Associated Press Writer
Monday, January 30, 2006

(01-30) 11:42 PST MIAMI, (AP) --

Nam June Paik, the avant-garde artist credited with inventing video art in the 1960s by combining multiple TV screens with sculpture, music and live performers, has died. He was 74.

The Korean-born Paik, who also coined the term "Electronic Super Highway" years before the information superhighway was invented, died Sunday night of natural causes at his Miami apartment, according to his Web site.

Song Tae-ho, head of a South Korean cultural foundation working on a project to build a museum for the artist, said he learned of Paik's death from Paik's nephew, Ken Paik Hakuta, in New York.

Paik's work gained international praise from the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, and the Museum of Broadcast Communications in Chicago, among others, and much of it is on display at the Nam June Paik Museum in Kyonggi, South Korea.

"He really led the development of a new art form, bringing the moving image into the modern art world," said John Hanhardt, senior curator of film and media arts at the Guggenheim.

Hanhardt called Paik a true friend and a prophet.

"He foresaw that video would be an artist's medium, that it would be in museums," he said. "It's a heroic achievement."

In a 1974 report commissioned by the Rockefeller Foundation, Paik wrote of a telecommunications network of the future he called the "Electronic Super Highway," predicting it "will become our springboard for new and surprising human endeavors." Two decades later, when "information superhighway" had become the phrase of the moment, he commented, "Bill Clinton stole my idea."

He also was often credited with coining the phrase, "The future is now."

Trained in music, aesthetics and philosophy, he was a member of the 1960s art movement Fluxus, which was in part inspired by composer John Cage's use of everyday sounds in his music. Another Fluxus adherent was the young Yoko Ono.

Paik made his artistic debut in Wiesbaden, West Germany, in 1963 with a solo art exhibition titled "Exposition of Music-Electronic Television." He scattered 12 television sets throughout the exhibit space and used them to create unexpected effects in the images being received. Later exhibits included the use of magnets to manipulate or alter the image on TV sets and create patterns of light.

He moved to New York in 1964 and started working with classical cellist Charlotte Moorman to combine video, music and performance.

In "TV Cello" they stacked television sets that formed the shape of a cello. When she drew the bow across the television sets, there were images of her playing, video collages of other cellists and live images of the performance.

In one highly publicized incident, Moorman was arrested in 1967 in New York for going topless in performing Paik's "Opera Sextronique." Said one headline: "Cops Top a Topless `Happening.'" In a 1969 performance titled "TV Bra for Living Sculpture," she wore a bra with tiny TV screens over her breasts.

Another of Paik's pieces, "TV Buddha," is a statue of a sitting Buddha facing its own image on a closed-circuit television screen, while "Positive Egg," has a video camera aimed at a white egg on a black cloth. In a series of larger and larger monitors, the image is magnified until the actual egg becomes an abstract shape on the screen.

Paik also incorporated television sets into a series of robots. The early robots were constructed largely of bits and pieces of wire and metal; later ones were built from vintage radio and television sets.

Famous worldwide, Paik never forgot his native Korea. In 1986, public television showed Paik's "Bye Bye Kipling," a mix of taped and live events, mostly from Paik's native Seoul; Tokyo; and New York. Two years later, Paik erected a media tower, called "The more the better," from 1,003 monitors for the Olympic Games at Seoul.

Paik was left partially paralyzed by a stroke in 1996.

Funeral services will be held this week in New York, Hakuta told South Korea's Yonhap news agency.
___

Paik's Web site:
www.paikstudios.com/


URL: http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/n/a/2006/01/30/entertainment/e114253S26.DTL
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martiki
Official Mixologist

Joined: Mar 29, 2002
Posts: 3058
From: http://www.smugglerscovesf.com
Posted: 2006-02-02 07:50 am   Permalink

I was very sad to learn about Wendy Wasserstein's death. Wendy's first play, "Uncommon Women and Others" was the second play I directed. It's an excellent show, and it was a profound experience for me, directing an all-female cast. I learned a lot from that time. Wasserstein was a really gifted playwright.



 
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c10
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Mar 04, 2005
Posts: 48
From: Napertucky, Illinois
Posted: 2006-02-04 3:55 pm   Permalink

Grandpa Munster, 95:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5189733

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mrs. pineapple
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 12, 2003
Posts: 611
Posted: 2006-02-04 9:25 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2006-02-04 15:55, c10 wrote:
Grandpa Munster, 95:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5189733



I just read that he ran against Pataki for gov. of NY on the Green Party ticket! and he petitioned to get his name on the ballot as Granpa Al Lewis! That's cool!

Oh yeah, Betty Friedan died today also, not such a good week for pioneering women...
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johntiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 31, 2002
Posts: 1525
From: MD
Posted: 2006-02-25 6:25 pm   Permalink

Don Knotts dead at 81... we'll miss you Barney Fife - the shining example of what all small town cops aspire to!

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060226/ap_en_tv/obit_knotts_14
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ookoo lady
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 24, 2004
Posts: 779
Posted: 2006-02-25 7:44 pm   Permalink

Don Knotts was a patient of my boss, and came to our office fairly often. Even towards the end when he was in frail health, he was always very sweet and friendly. I'll miss him.
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HelloTiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 23, 2005
Posts: 440
From: Kailua, Hawaii
Posted: 2006-02-26 08:00 am   Permalink

Darrin Mcgavin of Night Stalker fame just passed on.
(But he'll come back.)
Oh yeah, and my 17 year old cat Sylvester, (everybody remember him? Of course you do.)
He's Pau too.

[ This Message was edited by: HelloTiki 2006-02-26 08:03 ]

[ This Message was edited by: hellotiki 2006-02-26 08:13 ]


 
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Tikiwahine
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 09, 2003
Posts: 3288
From: Victoria, BC
Posted: 2006-02-26 5:58 pm   Permalink

Darrin Mcgavin also played the Dad in the holiday classic, "A Christmas Story".

 
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johntiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 31, 2002
Posts: 1525
From: MD
Posted: 2006-02-27 10:40 am   Permalink



Oh God this is really hitting close to home now... Dennis Weaver is dead at 81! Online accounts of his passing mention his role in Gunsmoke - I'll always remember him as David Mann in one of the best bad movies ever made - Duel!

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060227/ap_on_en_mo/obit_weaver




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Rob Roy
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Dec 03, 2004
Posts: 354
From: Ventura, CA
Posted: 2006-02-27 10:58 am   Permalink

Obit for Darren McGavin

Darren McGavin, 83; Prolific Actor in 'Night Stalker,' 'Christmas Story'

By Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
February 27 2006

Darren McGavin, an Emmy-winning actor who worked almost constantly in television for almost 50 years and made an enduring mark on popular culture as the grizzled has-been crime reporter in the 1970s series "Kolchak: The Night Stalker," has died. He was 83.

McGavin, who also is remembered for portraying the curmudgeonly father in the 1983 film "A Christmas Story," died of natural causes Saturday at a Los Angeles-area hospital, his family said.

Although he had roots on stage and in film, long-term success came on the small screen, often in the form of gruff-voiced authority figures. One such role the opinionated father of Candice Bergen on "Murphy Brown" (CBS, 1988 to 1998) earned him an Emmy Award in 1990.

McGavin starred in several TV series, including the syndicated "Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer" (1957 to 1959), "Riverboat" (NBC, 1959 to 1961), "The Outsider" (NBC, 1968 to 1969) and the short-lived CBS comedy "Small & Frye" (1983).
He first played fast-talking Carl Kolchak in "The Night Stalker," a TV movie about a reporter covering a vampire's killing spree in Las Vegas. When it first aired in 1972, the movie set a ratings record.

"That marvelous hunk of creepy camp of a TV movie," as The Times called it in 1974, was followed by a 1973 sequel, "The Night Strangler." The ABC series that seemed to captivate a generation of future sci-fi scriptwriters aired for a single season beginning in 1974.

The "Night Stalker" movies and series have been credited with inspiring contemporary entertainment, including the WB series "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" and the 1997 film "Men in Black." Writer-producer Chris Carter has often cited Kolchak as the primary inspiration for the long-running fantasy-drama "The X-Files" that first aired on Fox in 1993.

"The Night Stalker's" combination of fear and fun worked in large part because of the "jauntiness in the face of doom" that McGavin brought to what he called "the role of a lifetime," Frank Spotnitz, a producer of a short-lived revival of the series that aired on ABC last fall, wrote in Entertainment Weekly in 2005. By the time the 20th episode of the original series had aired, ABC had granted McGavin's pleas to put him and the low-rated series out of their misery. Despite treasuring the part, McGavin knew that the high-concept idea of chasing after supernatural monsters of the week as a way of breaking into the big leagues of journalism wouldn't work over the long haul.

Ever outspoken, McGavin criticized television for creating "cardboard characters," he told The Times in 1968, and he pointed the finger at his private-eye detective series "Mike Hammer," so violent that TV Guide once called it "easily the worst show on TV."
"Hammer was a dummy. I made 72 of those shows and thought it was a comedy," McGavin recalled. "In fact, I played it camp. He was the kind of guy who'd have waved the flag for George Wallace."

After leaving behind the character who was known for either kissing or killing the women, McGavin co-starred with Burt Reynolds as a skipper in "Riverboat," set in the 1840s. That was another series, McGavin said, that could use a reality check. "We'd dock in New Orleans and there'd never be a Negro in sight. That's when the series started to crumble," he said in 1968.

On the big screen, McGavin first received notice in two 1955 films for portraying a young artist in Venice in David Lean's "Summertime" and Frank Sinatra's drug supplier in Otto Preminger's "The Man With The Golden Arm." He also was Jerry Lewis' parole officer in "The Delicate Delinquent" (1957) and a gambler in 1984's "The Natural." He starred alongside Don Knotts, who died Friday, in the 1976 family comedy "No Deposit, No Return."

In "A Christmas Story," McGavin played the narrator's father who grumbles his fair share of profanity. Years later, he demonstrated the art of garbled cussing on "Larry King Live" on CNN.

Other memorable roles included playing Gen. George Patton in the 1979 miniseries "Ike," and appearing alongside Rock Hudson in the sci-fi miniseries "The Martian Chronicles."

He was born May 7, 1922, to Reid Delano Richardson and Grace Bogart McGavin in Spokane, Wash., although some sources give his birthplace as San Joaquin, Calif.

McGavin never revealed much about his childhood, but he told TV Guide in 1973 that he was a constant runaway by 10, and as a teen he lived in warehouses in Tacoma, Wash. His parents vanished, he said. After attending College of the Pacific in Stockton for a year, McGavin dropped out and moved to New York. He studied acting at the Neighborhood Playhouse under the legendary Sanford Meisner and at the Actors Studio.

In New York and on the road, he portrayed Happy, the second son of Willy Loman in "Death of a Salesman." He spent more than a dozen years performing on Broadway, beginning in 1953, including appearing in "The Rainmaker."
McGavin liked to portray his early film career as something he pulled over on Hollywood. While painting a set for "A Song to Remember" at Columbia, he learned about a small role in the 1945 film that still needed to be cast.
After cleaning up, he walked back in the front gate with his agent and the director, Charles Vidor, hired him.
Only the paint foreman recognized him and said, "You're fired."

Survivors include his four children Bogart, Bridget, Megan and York from his first marriage, which ended in divorce. His second wife, the actress Kathie Browne McGavin, died in 2003.


 
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cynfulcynner
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 24, 2002
Posts: 1800
From: Ocean Beach, San Francisco
Posted: 2006-02-28 04:30 am   Permalink


Dammit! I'm never going to win this year's celebrity dead pool at this rate!! (Last year I came in second.)


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