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The Dead Thread
pappythesailor
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 07, 2005
Posts: 1564
From: Mass.
Posted: 2008-03-19 08:57 am   Permalink



'Hogan's Heroes' Actor Ivan Dixon Dies

13 hours ago

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Ivan Dixon, an actor, director and producer best known for his role as Kinchloe on the 1960s television series "Hogan's Heroes," has died. He was 76.

Dixon died Sunday at Presbyterian Hospital in Charlotte after a hemorrhage and of complications from kidney failure, said his daughter, Doris Nomathande Dixon of Charlotte.

Actor Sidney Poitier said the two men became friends after Dixon was his stunt double in the 1958 movie "The Defiant Ones."

"As an actor, you had to be careful," Poitier said in a statement. "He was quite likely to walk off with the scene."

Dixon began his acting career on Broadway in plays including "The Cave Dwellers" and "A Raisin in the Sun." On film, he appeared in "Something of Value," "A Raisin in the Sun," "A Patch of Blue," "Nothing But a Man" and the cult favorite "Car Wash."

But he was probably best known for the role of U.S. Staff Sgt. James Kinchloe on "Hogan's Heroes," a satire set in a German prisoner-of-war camp during World War II. Kinchloe, in charge of electronic communications, could mimic German officers on the radio or phone.

While her father was most proud of work in plays such as "A Raisin in the Sun" and for films such as "Nothing But a Man," he had no mixed feelings about being recognized for the role of Kinchloe, his daughter said.

"It was a pivotal role as well, because there were not as many blacks in TV series at that time," Nomathande Dixon said. "He did have some personal issues with that role, but it also launched him into directing."

Dixon also earned an Emmy nomination for his performance in the CBS Playhouse special "The Final War of Olly Winter."

In addition to acting on television, he also directed hundreds of episodic shows, including "The Waltons," "The Rockford Files," "Magnum, P.I." and "In the Heat of the Night."

Born April 6, 1931, in New York City, Dixon graduated in 1954 from North Carolina Central University in Durham.

His honors include four NAACP Image Awards, the National Black Theatre Award and the Paul Robeson Pioneer Award from the Black American Cinema Society. He was a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the Directors Guild of America, the Screen Actors Guild of America and the Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame.

In addition to his daughter, survivors include his wife of 53 years, Berlie Dixon of Charlotte, and a son, Alan Kimara Dixon of Oakland, Calif. Two sons, Ivan Nathaniel Dixon IV and N'Gai Christopher Dixon, died previously.

At Dixon's request, the family said, no memorial or funeral is planned.


 
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bamalamalu
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 20, 2006
Posts: 602
Posted: 2008-03-20 12:32 pm   Permalink

Mikey Dread

Mikey Dread, who has died aged 54, was a revolutionary force in Jamaican popular music and became known in Britain as a producer of the Clash; he produced the band's single Bankrobber and contributed to several songs on their album Sandinista! (both 1980).




 
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VampiressRN
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 23, 2006
Posts: 5810
From: Sun City Lincoln Hills (NorCal)
Posted: 2008-03-20 8:00 pm   Permalink

Not a famous person....but another bizarre sting ray attack and death!!!
======================================================

MARATHON, Fla. (March 20) - An eagle ray leaped onto a boat off the Florida Keys on Thursday and stabbed a woman with its barb, knocking her to the deck and killing her, a Florida wildlife investigator said.

A woman who was on a boat with her family off the Florida Keys died Wednesday after an eagle ray leapt out of the water and struck her in the neck with its barb, local media reports said. It's unclear whether the 55-year-old Michigan woman was killed by the eagle ray's barb or by falling after the attack. The animal is seen above on the boat.

"It's a bizarre accident," said Jorge Pino, an agent with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

The woman and her family were aboard a boat in the Atlantic Ocean, off the city of Marathon in the Florida Keys, he said.

"A large ray jumped out of the water and collided with the victim and somehow the barb penetrated some part of her body, which caused her to fall back and hit her head on some portion of the vessel," Pino said. "We don't know exactly which one of those things caused her death."

Local media said the animal's barb had impaled the woman through the neck.

Eagle rays are common in warm or tropical waters and are often seen near coral reefs. The spotted creatures can grow to more than 8 feet across and have two to six short, venomous barbs near the base of their whip-like tails, according to the Florida Museum of Natural History's Web site.

The rays often swim near the water's surface and can leap out, especially when pursued, but are generally shy of humans.

"All rays leap out of the water from time to time but certainly to see one collide with a vessel is extremely unusual," Pino said.
_________________
"Oh waiter, another cocktail please!!!"


 
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dogbytes
  

Joined: Mar 24, 2002
Posts: 2242
From: seattle, wa
Posted: 2008-03-27 12:00 am   Permalink

the guy who invented egg mc muffins

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VampiressRN
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 23, 2006
Posts: 5810
From: Sun City Lincoln Hills (NorCal)
Posted: 2008-04-06 07:15 am   Permalink

LOS ANGELES (April 6) - Charlton Heston, who won the 1959 best actor Oscar as the chariot-racing "Ben-Hur" and portrayed Moses, Michelangelo, El Cid and other heroic figures in movie epics of the '50s and '60s, has died. He was 84.

The actor died Saturday night at his home in Beverly Hills with his wife Lydia at his side, family spokesman Bill Powers said.

Charlton Heston died in Beverly Hills with his wife Lydia by his side. The two had been married for 64 years. Here, they are seen at a "90 Stars for 90 Years" party in 2002.

Powers declined to comment on the cause of death or provide further details.

"Charlton Heston was seen by the world as larger than life. He was known for his chiseled jaw, broad shoulders and resonating voice, and, of course, for the roles he played," Heston's family said in a statement. "No one could ask for a fuller life than his. No man could have given more to his family, to his profession, and to his country."

Heston revealed in 2002 that he had symptoms consistent with Alzheimer's disease, saying, "I must reconcile courage and surrender in equal measure."

With his large, muscular build, well-boned face and sonorous voice, Heston proved the ideal star during the period when Hollywood was filling movie screens with panoramas depicting the religious and historical past. "I have a face that belongs in another century," he often remarked.

Publicist Michael Levine, who represented Heston for about 20 years, said the actor's passing represented the end of an iconic era for cinema.


Heston's Legendary Roles


'The Ten Commandments'

'Ben-Hur'

'Planet of the Apes'

'Soylent Green'


"If Hollywood had a Mt. Rushmore, Heston's face would be on it," Levine said. "He was a heroic figure that I don't think exists to the same degree in Hollywood today."

The actor assumed the role of leader offscreen as well. He served as president of the Screen Actors Guild and chairman of the American Film Institute and marched in the civil rights movement of the 1950s. With age, he grew more conservative and campaigned for conservative candidates.

In June 1998, Heston was elected president of the National Rifle Association, for which he had posed for ads holding a rifle. He delivered a jab at then-President Clinton, saying, "America doesn't trust you with our 21-year-old daughters, and we sure, Lord, don't trust you with our guns."

Heston stepped down as NRA president in April 2003, telling members his five years in office were "quite a ride. ... I loved every minute of it."

Later that year, Heston was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor. "The largeness of character that comes across the screen has also been seen throughout his life," President Bush said at the time.

He engaged in a lengthy feud with liberal Ed Asner during the latter's tenure as president of the Screen Actors Guild. His latter-day activism almost overshadowed his achievements as an actor, which were considerable.

Heston lent his strong presence to some of the most acclaimed and successful films of the midcentury. "Ben-Hur" won 11 Academy Awards, tying it for the record with the more recent "Titanic" (1997) and "The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King" (2003). Heston's other hits include: "The Ten Commandments," "El Cid," "55 Days at Peking," "Planet of the Apes" and "Earthquake."
An Oscar-winning actor for 'Ben-Hur,' Heston also played heroic roles in films as diverse as 'The Ten Commandments,' 'Touch of Evil' and 'Planet of the Apes.' He was 84. His family would not reveal the cause of death.

Andrew Jackson ("The President's Lady," "The Buccaneer"), Moses ("The Ten Commandments"), title role of "El Cid," John the Baptist ("The Greatest Story Ever Told"), Michelangelo ("The Agony and the Ecstasy"), General Gordon ("Khartoum"), Marc Antony ("Julius Caesar," "Antony and Cleopatra"), Cardinal Richelieu ("The Three Musketeers"), Henry VIII ("The Prince and the Pauper").

Heston made his movie debut in the 1940s in two independent films by a college classmate, David Bradley, who later became a noted film archivist. He had the title role in "Peer Gynt" in 1942 and was Marc Antony in Bradley's 1949 version of "Julius Caesar," for which Heston was paid $50 a week.

Film producer Hal B. Wallis ("Casablanca") spotted Heston in a 1950 television production of "Wuthering Heights" and offered him a contract. When his wife reminded him that they had decided to pursue theater and television, he replied, "Well, maybe just for one film to see what it's like."

Heston earned star billing from his first Hollywood movie, "Dark City," a 1950 film noir. Cecil B. DeMille next cast him as the circus manager in the all-star "The Greatest Show On Earth," named by the Motion Picture Academy as the best picture of 1952. More movies followed:

"The Savage," "Ruby Gentry," "The President's Lady," "Pony Express" (as Buffalo Bill Cody), "Arrowhead," "Bad for Each Other," "The Naked Jungle," "Secret of the Incas," "The Far Horizons" (as Clark of the Lewis and Clark trek), "The Private War of Major Benson," "Lucy Gallant."

Most were forgettable low-budget films, and Heston seemed destined to remain an undistinguished action star. His old boss DeMille rescued him.

The director had long planned a new version of "The Ten Commandments," which he had made as a silent in 1923 with a radically different approach that combined biblical and modern stories. He was struck by Heston's facial resemblance to Michelangelo's sculpture of Moses, especially the similar broken nose, and put the actor through a long series of tests before giving him the role.

The Hestons' newborn, Fraser Clarke Heston, played the role of the infant Moses in the film.

More films followed: the eccentric thriller "Touch of Evil," directed by Orson Welles; William Wyler's "The Big Country," costarring with Gregory Peck; a sea saga, "The Wreck of the Mary Deare" with Gary Cooper.

Then his greatest role: "Ben-Hur."

Heston wasn't the first to be considered for the remake of 1925 biblical epic. Marlon Brando, Burt Lancaster and Rock Hudson had declined the film. Heston plunged into the role, rehearsing two months for the furious chariot race.

He railed at suggestions the race had been shot with a double: "I couldn't drive it well, but that wasn't necessary. All I had to do was stay on board so they could shoot me there. I didn't have to worry; MGM guaranteed I would win the race."

The huge success of "Ben-Hur" and Heston's Oscar made him one of the highest-paid stars in Hollywood. He combined big-screen epics like "El Cid" and "55 Days at Peking" with lesser ones such as "Diamond Head," "Will Penny" and "Airport 1975." In his later years he played cameos in such films as "Wayne's World 2" and "Tombstone."

He often returned to the theater, appearing in such plays as "A Long Day's Journey into Night" and "A Man for All Seasons." He starred as a tycoon in the prime-time soap opera, "The Colbys," a two-season spinoff of "Dynasty."

At his birth in a Chicago suburb on Oct. 4, 1923, his name was Charles Carter. His parents moved to St. Helen, Mich., where his father, Russell Carter, operated a lumber mill. Growing up in the Michigan woods with almost no playmates, young Charles read books of adventure and devised his own games while wandering the countryside with his rifle.

Charles's parents divorced, and she married Chester Heston, a factory plant superintendent in Wilmette, Ill., an upscale north Chicago suburb. Shy and feeling displaced in the big city, the boy had trouble adjusting to the new high school. He took refuge in the drama department.

"What acting offered me was the chance to be many other people," he said in a 1986 interview. "In those days I wasn't satisfied with being me."

Calling himself Charlton Heston from his mother's maiden name and his stepfather's last name, he won an acting scholarship to Northwestern University in 1941. He excelled in campus plays and appeared on Chicago radio. In 1943, he enlisted in the Army Air Force and served as a radio-gunner in the Aleutians.

In 1944 he married another Northwestern drama student, Lydia Clarke, and after his army discharge in 1947, they moved to New York to seek acting jobs. Finding none, they hired on as codirectors and principal actors at a summer theater in Asheville, N.C.

Back in New York, both Hestons began finding work. With his strong 6-feet-2 build and craggily handsome face, Heston won roles in TV soap operas, plays ("Antony and Cleopatra" with Katherine Cornell) and live TV dramas such as "Julius Caesar," "Macbeth," "The Taming of the Shrew" and "Of Human Bondage."

Heston wrote several books: "The Actor's Life: Journals 1956-1976," published in 1978; "Beijing Diary: 1990," concerning his direction of the play "The Caine Mutiny Court Martial" in Chinese; "In the Arena: An Autobiography," 1995; and "Charlton Heston's Hollywood: 50 Years of American Filmmaking," 1998.

Besides Fraser, who directed his father in an adventure film, "Mother Lode," the Hestons had a daughter, Holly Ann, born Aug. 2, 1961. The couple celebrated their golden wedding anniversary in 1994 at a party with Hollywood and political friends. They had been married 64 years when he died.

In late years, Heston drew as much publicity for his crusades as for his performances. In addition to his NRA work, he campaigned for Republican presidential and congressional candidates and against affirmative action.

He resigned from Actors Equity, claiming the union's refusal to allow a white actor to play a Eurasian role in "Miss Saigon" was "obscenely racist." He attacked CNN's telecasts from Baghdad as "sowing doubts" about the allied effort in the 1990-91 Gulf War.

At a Time Warner stockholders meeting, he castigated the company for releasing an Ice-T album that purportedly encouraged cop killing.

Heston wrote in "In the Arena" that he was proud of what he did "though now I'll surely never be offered another film by Warners, nor get a good review in Time. On the other hand, I doubt I'll get a traffic ticket very soon."

[ This Message was edited by: VampiressRN 2008-04-06 07:20 ]


 
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54 house of bamboo
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Sep 28, 2006
Posts: 302
From: Cambridge UK
Posted: 2008-04-06 11:25 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2008-04-06 07:15, VampiressRN wrote:
LOS ANGELES (April 6) - Charlton Heston, who won the 1959 best actor Oscar as the chariot-racing "Ben-Hur" and portrayed Moses, Michelangelo, El Cid and other heroic figures in movie epics of the '50s and '60s, has died. He was 84.



Sad. I saw him in "A Man for All Seasons" on the stage at The Savoy Theatre in London c. 1988.

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The Stevenson Wedding Mug by Cheekytiki, 2006


 
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Bora Boris
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2005
Posts: 2599
From: Boogie Wonderland
Posted: 2008-04-06 11:41 am   Permalink

What, if anything, did they have to pry from his Cold, Dead Hands?

The remote control?


 
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Mai Tai
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 21, 2004
Posts: 1436
From: Exotic Isle of Alameda
Posted: 2008-04-06 12:52 pm   Permalink

No, just banaynays, banaynays, banaynays.

 
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King Bushwich the 33rd
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 10, 2005
Posts: 1202
From: Ling Cod Beach, CA 90803
Posted: 2008-04-14 12:15 pm   Permalink

Winona Kapuailohiamanonokalani Desha Beamer passed away on the morning of April 10th in Lahaina, Hawaii.

A noted authority on Hawaiian culture and matriarch of the musical Beamer family. She was 84.


Star Telegram

Keola Beamer Page


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Rob Roy
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Dec 03, 2004
Posts: 354
From: Ventura, CA
Posted: 2008-04-15 10:09 am   Permalink

Ollie Johnston, the last of Disney's "Nine old Men"

http://blogs.orlandosentinel.com/entertainment_movies_blog/2008/04/ollie-johnston.html

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King Bushwich the 33rd
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 10, 2005
Posts: 1202
From: Ling Cod Beach, CA 90803
Posted: 2008-04-30 09:10 am   Permalink

Dr Albert Hofmann The Inventor of LSD
January 11 1906 - April 29 2008

Albert Hofmann Foundation

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mrtikibar
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 07, 2002
Posts: 836
From: Neskowin, OR
Posted: 2008-05-04 5:31 pm   Permalink

Gary Ewing, light show artist (and fellow Cleveland High School Grad.)
http://www.oregonlive.com/news/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/news/1209608703155670.xml&coll=7

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Bogielocks
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Feb 11, 2007
Posts: 352
From: New Bedford, MA
Posted: 2008-05-04 8:10 pm   Permalink

Although this is about a week old, gotta say I loved the song "I Go Crazy"

Paul Davis, a singer and songwriter whose soft rock hit “I Go Crazy" stayed on the charts for months after its release in 1977, died Tuesday. He was 60. Davis

Paul Davis' hits included “I Go Crazy," “ '65 Love Affair" and “Cool Night."


Davis died of a heart attack at Rush Foundation Hospital in Meridian, the city where he grew up, cousin James Edwards said.


Davis' other popular hits included “65 Love Affair;" “You're Still New To Me," a country duet with Marie Osmond; and “Ride 'Em Cowboy."


His 1977 album “Singer of Songs -- Teller of Tales" featured the ballad “I Go Crazy." The song slowly climbed the charts, peaking at No. 7 eight months after its release, according to Billboard's Web site. The song stayed in the Top 100 for 40 weeks, according to Billboard -- a record at the time for the magazine's Hot 100 chart. The mark has since been surpassed many times; the current record holder is LeAnn Rimes' “How Do I Live," which stayed on the Hot 100 for 69 weeks.


Davis spent part of his early career in Jackson at Malaco Records, company President Tommy Couch said.


Couch said Davis arrived at Malaco with his writing partner, George Soule, around 1968.


After Davis left Jackson, he moved to New York, Nashville and then back to Meridian, Couch said.


Edwards said his cousin had returned to Mississippi to retire.


_________________


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King Bushwich the 33rd
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 10, 2005
Posts: 1202
From: Ling Cod Beach, CA 90803
Posted: 2008-05-14 09:48 am   Permalink

Recording engineer Larry Levine
May 8, 1928 - May 8, 2008
Worked with Phil Spector to develop "Wall of Sound"
Los Angeles Times

Artist Robert Rauschenberg
1925- 5/12/2008
Yahoo! News


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beadtiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 24, 2007
Posts: 929
From: Bothell, Washington
Posted: 2008-05-17 3:12 pm   Permalink

This thread reminds me of my father - he'll sit around the breakfast table reading the obits! I guess the closer you get to it the more interesting it becomes!

 
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