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The Dead Thread
King Bushwich the 33rd
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 10, 2005
Posts: 1183
From: Ling Cod Beach, CA 90803
Posted: 2008-09-17 12:29 pm   Permalink

Novelist, short story writer, essayist, college professor
David Foster Wallace
February 21, 1962 – September 12, 2008

Los Angeles Times: David Foster Wallace

Chicago Sun Times: Depths of Human Despair


[ This Message was edited by: King Bushwich the 33rd 2008-09-17 13:08 ]


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The Gnomon
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 01, 2007
Posts: 1293
From: MD-DC-VA
Posted: 2008-09-18 07:44 am   Permalink

Motown legend Whitfield dies at 67
Wednesday September 17, 2008

  • Norman Whitfield was producer, writer for Motown
  • Whitfield wrote and produced much of Temptations' late '60s-early '70s material
  • Other Whitfield compositions: "I Heard It Through the Grapevine," "War"


LOS ANGELES, California (AP) -- Norman Whitfield, who co-wrote a string of Motown classics including "War" and "I Heard It Through the Grapevine," has died. He was 67.

Norman Whitfield was one of Motown's leading writers and producers.

A spokeswoman at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center says Whitfield died there Tuesday. He suffered from complications of diabetes and had recently emerged from a coma, The Detroit Free Press reported.

Whitfield was a longtime Motown producer who during the 1960s and '70s injected rock and psychedelic touches into the label's soul music. Many of his biggest hits were co-written with Barrett Strong, with whom he was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2004.

The two won the Grammy in 1972 for best R&B song for the Temptations' "Papa Was a Rolling Stone." Whitfield won another Grammy in 1976 for best original TV or motion picture score for "Car Wash."

Whitfield also worked as a producer for the Temptations and others.

Many of Whitfield's songs from that era, including Edwin Starr's 1970 "War" and the Temptations' 1970 "Ball of Confusion (That's What the World Is Today)," have a strong political tone.

In a statement, Motown great Smokey Robinson hailed Whitfield as "one of the most prolific songwriters and record producers of our time. He will live forever through his great music."

Among Whitfield's other songs, according to the Songwriters Hall Web site, are "Beauty Is Only Skin Deep," "Cloud Nine" and "Just My Imagination (Running Away With Me)," all hits for the Temptations; and "Too Busy Thinking About My Baby," a 1969 hit for Marvin Gaye.

Just last week, Gaye's version of "I Heard It Through the Grapevine," from 1968, was ranked at No. 65 in Billboard magazine's compilation of the top singles of the past 50 years. It was also a hit for Gladys Knight and the Pips, in 1967.


 
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King Bushwich the 33rd
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 10, 2005
Posts: 1183
From: Ling Cod Beach, CA 90803
Posted: 2008-09-21 9:41 pm   Permalink

Earl Palmer - Legendary New Orleans session drummer
10/25/1924-9/19/2008

All about Jazz: Earl Palmer

Drummer World: Earl Palmer

Palmer recorded with Frank Sinatra, Bobby Darin, Sam Cooke, Glen Campbell, Dizzy Gillespie, Count Basie, Ray Charles, Nat King Cole, the Everly Brothers, the Beach Boys, Willie Nelson, Sonny & Cher, the Supremes, the Monkees, Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass, Paul Anka, Mel Torme, the Ronettes, Jan & Dean, Lou Rawls, James Brown, Screamin' Jay Hawkins, Marvin Gaye, Sarah Vaughan and Neil Young.

He was the drummer on Ike and Tina Turner's “River Deep Mountain High,” the Righteous Brothers' smash “You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'” and Ritchie Valens' signature “La Bamba.”

Palmer was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2000.


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ahvyna
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Feb 05, 2008
Posts: 38
From: san diego
Posted: 2008-09-27 07:17 am   Permalink

Goodbye Paul Newman. We'll miss you.

[ This Message was edited by: ahvyna 2008-09-27 07:19 ]


 
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VampiressRN
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 23, 2006
Posts: 5773
From: Sun City Lincoln Hills (NorCal)
Posted: 2008-09-27 08:37 am   Permalink

Yes....we will miss Paul...he was a great actor and humanitarian.

(CNN) -- Paul Newman, the legendary actor whose steely blue eyes, good-humored charm and advocacy of worthy causes made him one of the most renowned figures in American arts, has died of cancer at his home in Westport, Connecticut. He was 83.
Oscar-winning actor Paul Newman died of cancer Friday at age 83.

Oscar-winning actor Paul Newman died of cancer Friday at age 83.

CNN-He died Friday, according to spokeswoman Marni Tomljanovic.

Newman attained stardom in the 1950s and never lost the movie-star aura, appearing in such classic films as "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof," "Exodus," "The Hustler," "Cool Hand Luke," "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," "The Sting" and "The Verdict."

He finally won an Oscar in 1986 -- on his eighth try -- for "The Color of Money," a sequel to "The Hustler." He later received two more Oscar nominations. Among his other awards was the Motion Picture Academy's Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award. Video Watch a look back at Newman's career »

"Paul took advantage of what life offered him, and while personally reluctant to acknowledge that he was doing anything special, he forever changed the lives of many with his generosity, humor, and humanness," said Robert Forrester, vice chairman of the actor's Newman's Own Foundation. "His legacy lives on in the charities he supported and the Hole in the Wall Camps, for which he cared so much."

Newman was a Method-trained actor who blazed his own career trail and didn't shy away from risky roles -- inside and outside films.

A portrayal as a race-car driver in 1969's "Winning" led to his actual competition in races; at 70, he participated in the 24 Hours of Daytona and he was still racing at age 80.
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* iReport.com: Share your memories of Paul Newman

He stumped for liberal causes, including Eugene McCarthy's 1968 presidential candidacy, and earned a spot on Richard Nixon's enemies list -- "the highest single honor I've ever received," he said.

In 1982, Newman and his friend A.E. Hotchner founded Newman's Own, a food company that produced food ranging from pasta sauces to salad dressing to chocolate chip cookies.

"The embarrassing thing is that the salad dressing is outgrossing my films," Newman once wryly noted.

To date, the company -- which donates all profits to charities such as Newman's Hole in the Wall Gang camps -- has given away more than $200 million. Newman established the camp to benefit gravely ill children.

"He saw the camps as places where kids could escape the fear, pain and isolation of their conditions, kick back and raise a little hell," Forrester said.

Today, there are 11 Hole in the Wall Gang camps around the world, with additional programs in Africa and Vietnam. Some 135,000 children have attended the camps -- free of charge.

The Association of Hole in the Wall Camps "is part of his living legacy, and for that we remain forever grateful," the association said in a statement.

"We are greatly saddened by his passing. His leadership and spirit can never be replaced. But he has left us strong and confident."

Newman was half of one of the most successful showbiz marriages -- to Joanne Woodward, whom he married in 1958. He observed that just because he was a sex symbol there was no reason to commit adultery.

"Why would I go out for a hamburger when [I] have steak at home?" he asked.

CNN's Larry King, who interviewed Newman through the years, said he greatly admired the actor.

"He lived a long and terrific life," King said Saturday morning. "He was much appreciated. Did some theater, graduated Yale. Long marriage to Joanne Woodward. One of those showbiz rarities."

Paul Leonard Newman was born on January 26, 1925, in Shaker Heights, Ohio, a suburb of Cleveland. His father owned a successful sporting goods store, but young Paul was taken with his mother's and uncle's interest in the arts and started acting while still in grade school.

"I wasn't running toward the theater but running away from the sporting goods store," he said later.

After being kicked out of Ohio University for unruly behavior, he joined the Navy and served for three years during World War II. After the war he attended Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio, where his unruly ways led him to theater.

Newman continued studying acting at Yale and at New York's Actors' Studio, earning jobs in the growing medium of television.

He made his Broadway debut in William Inge's 1953 play "Picnic," opposite Kim Stanley, one of the most successful stage actresses of her time. The next year he made his first Hollywood film, "The Silver Chalice," a bomb that he mocked for the rest of his life. He even took out a newspaper ad apologizing for his performance.

But success as boxer Rocky Graziano in "Somebody Up There Likes Me" (1956) made him a star, and more hits followed: "The Long, Hot Summer" (1958) opposite his soon-to-be wife, Woodward; "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" (1958) with Elizabeth Taylor; and "The Young Philadelphians" (1959).

But the 1960s were to be Newman's decade, a perfect match for his ironic, anti-establishment attitude. iReport.com: What do you remember best about Paul Newman?

He began the decade with "Exodus" (1960), an epic about Israel's founding directed by Otto Preminger, and succeeded it with "The Hustler" (1961) as pool shark Fast Eddie Felson; "Sweet Bird of Youth" (1962), another Tennessee Williams work; and "Hud" (1963), "Harper" (1966) and "Hombre" (1967), continuing a good-luck streak of films beginning with "H."

After "Cool Hand Luke" (1967), in which he played the egg-eating malcontented title character, he turned to directing, earning raves for his behind-the-camera work on "Rachel, Rachel" (1968), starring his wife.

"Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" (1969) and "The Sting" (1973) teamed Newman with co-star Robert Redford and director George Roy Hill. The trio proved to be box-office gold: They were two of the highest-grossing films of their time, winning a slew of awards -- including a best picture Oscar for the latter, a tale of con men in 1930s Chicago.

Newman finally teamed up with Steve McQueen, who had been scheduled to be his co-star in "Butch Cassidy," in 1974's "The Towering Inferno." Though the Irwin Allen-produced disaster film earned mixed critical notices, it, too, was one of the most successful box-office films of the era.

Newman's career started faltering in the late '70s as he turned his attention to his other pursuits, notably racing. The loss of his son Scott to a drug overdose in 1978 hit the actor hard.

He made an artistic comeback with 1982's "The Verdict," the story of an ambulance-chasing hard-luck lawyer in which Newman appeared broken, raspy and every inch of his 58 years.

By the time Newman starred in "The Color of Money," directed by Martin Scorsese, his movie career had slipped a notch. Never afraid of playing his age, Newman portrayed a repressed businessman in 1990's "Mr. and Mrs. Bridge," a cantankerous lodger in "Nobody's Fool" (1994), a fatherly, retired gangster in "Road to Perdition" (2002), and the voice of a Hudson Hornet in "Cars" (2006).

He gained some of his best reviews for his performance as the stage manager in a Broadway production of Thornton Wilder's classic play, "Our Town," filmed for television in 2003, and was perfectly cast as the rascally father to Ed Harris' responsible diner owner in the miniseries "Empire Falls."

In recent years, Newman talked about doing another film with his friend Redford, but the two couldn't settle on a script. In 2007, Newman said he was retiring from acting, saying he'd lost confidence in his abilities. Still, he marveled at his own resilience.
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"You can't be as old as I am without waking up with a surprised look on your face every morning: 'Holy Christ, whaddya know - I'm still around!' It's absolutely amazing that I survived all the booze and smoking and the cars and the career."

Newman, who was married to Jackie Witt from 1949 to 1957, is survived by his wife, Joanne Woodward, and five children.
_________________
"Oh waiter, another cocktail please!!!"


 
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bamalamalu
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 20, 2006
Posts: 573
Posted: 2008-10-02 08:13 am   Permalink

Mr. Clean

LOS ANGELES - House Peters Jr., a TV actor who became the original Mr. Clean in Proctor & Gamble's commercials for household cleaners, died Wednesday. He was 92.

Peters died of pneumonia at the Motion Picture and Television Fund Hospital in Los Angeles, said his son, Jon Peters.

The elder Peters' most memorable role came as Mr. Clean — a muscular man with a bald head, a hoop earring and a no-nonsense attitude toward dirt and grime. From the late 1950s and into the early 1960s, Peters Jr. helped advertise the famous household cleaner with the trademark jingle, "Mr. Clean, Mr. Clean."


http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081002/ap_en_ot/obit_peters_jr

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PremEx
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 23, 2006
Posts: 292
From: Houston, Texas
Posted: 2008-10-02 08:48 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2008-09-27 08:37, VampiressRN wrote:
"The embarrassing thing is that the salad dressing is outgrossing my films," Newman once wryly noted.



I had the good fortune of spending a little time with Robert Redford a few months back, and he told me a story about how he was having dinner at a restaurant and he spotted this family eyeballing him closely. Finally the father of this family worked up enough courage to walk over to Redford's table to say hello and tell him how much he and his family liked his performances. As the gentleman was saying "Thanks" and about to leave, he added, "And we just love your salad dressings."


_________________


 
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aquaorama
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 11, 2003
Posts: 615
From: Tropical Bixby Knolls LBC
Posted: 2008-10-02 8:33 pm   Permalink

Damn....I remember my parents playing Kingston Trio records every Saturday afternoon growing up...

SAN DIEGO - Nick Reynolds, a founding member of the Kingston Trio who jump-started the revival folk scene of the late 1950s and paved the way for artists such as Bob Dylan and Joan Baez, has died. He was 75.

Reynolds had been hospitalized with acute respiratory disease and other illnesses, and died Wednesday in San Diego after his family took him off life support, said son Joshua Reynolds.

"Dad was so happy he turned people onto music in a way that people could really approach it, in a simple and honest way," Josh Reynolds told The Associated Press. "He was a very gracious and loving performer. He was a devoted family man."

The Kingston Trio's version of the 19th century folk song "Tom Dooley" landed the group a No. 1 spot on the charts in 1958, and launched the band's career.

Born on July 27, 1933, in San Diego, Nicholas Reynolds demonstrated an early love of music and did sing-alongs with his two sisters and their Navy captain-father, who taught him to play guitar.

He graduated from Coronado High School in 1951 and attended the University of Arizona and San Diego State University before attending Menlo College, a business school near Palo Alto. He graduated from Menlo in 1956.

It was during the mid-1950s that Nicholas Reynolds met Bob Shane, who introduced him to Stanford student Dave Guard. Guard and Shane knew each other from playing music in Guard's native Hawaii. The three formed the Kingston Trio.

In 1958, "Tom Dooley" earned Reynolds, Guard and Shane a trophy for best country and western performance at the first Grammys. The group, defined by tight harmonies and a clean-cut style, went on to win a Grammy the next year for best folk performance for its album "The Kingston Trio At Large."

Later member John Stewart joined the group in 1961, replacing Guard. Stewart died in January, also in San Diego.

After leaving the Kingston Trio in 1967, Reynolds moved to Oregon, where he stayed until the 1980s and took a break from music to raise his family, his son said.

Reynolds moved back to California in the mid-1980s and rejoined Stewart for one album. In 1991, Reynolds rejoined Shane in a reconstituted version of the Trio. He remained with the group until retiring in 2003, his son said.

Reynolds is survived by his wife Leslie, sons Joshua and John Pike Reynolds, daughters Annie Reynolds Moore and Jennifer Reynolds, and his two sisters.





 
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RevBambooBen
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Nov 12, 2002
Posts: 7463
From: Huntikington Beach
Posted: 2008-10-04 06:50 am   Permalink



 
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Unkle John
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Oct 22, 2003
Posts: 1217
From: Middle-of-the-Ocean, TX
Posted: 2008-10-07 4:00 pm   Permalink

Ben, O.J. Isn't dead... just his career is.

 
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Unkle John
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Oct 22, 2003
Posts: 1217
From: Middle-of-the-Ocean, TX
Posted: 2008-10-07 4:03 pm   Permalink

John D. Harrington Sr., age 58 of Midlothian, TX passed away on September 30, 2008 in Dallas, TX , after a year long battle with cancer.

He was born on May 16, 1950 to Robert Noah and Julia Lou (Stricklin) Harrington of Midlothian. He married Terri Hanes on June 15, 1973.

He attended Midlothian schools and graduated in 1970 and joined the Air National Guard. John was a long time employee of Proctor and Gamble before making his final transition to Owens Corning where he was employed for over 14 years.

John was a member of The National Wildlife Federation and was awarded a Backyard Wildlife Habitat certification for his maintenance of his property as a preserve for wildlife.

John was a beloved husband, brother, father and grandfather. He will be dearly missed by his friends and family.

He is survived by his wife Terri Harrington; brothers Bobby Harrington and wife Faye of Grand Prairie, TX; Tommy Harrington and wife Donna of Midlothian, TX; sisters Mary Lou Ledbetter and husband Bill of Garland, TX; Sue Fuller and husband Tom of Cedar Hill, TX; sons, John David Harrington Jr. and wife Julie, Ben Hanes of Midlothian, TX; daughter; Stephanie Lenzer and husband Anthony of Midlothian, TX; 7 grandchildren and 5 nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his parents.

Visitation will be at the Midlothian Funeral Home Wednesday, October 1, 2008 from 6 to 8 p.m.

Funeral services will be held Thursday, October 2, 2008 at 1 p.m. at the Midlothian Funeral Home.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The National Wildlife Federation (www.nwf.org).

I miss you dad.

_________________


Texas Tikiphiles Unite!

[ This Message was edited by: Unkle John 2010-01-19 08:29 ]


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Psycho Tiki D
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Oct 13, 2006
Posts: 1810
From: The river Styx, can you pay the toll?
Posted: 2008-10-07 5:46 pm   Permalink

Unkle John,

My sincerest condolences.

Duane


 
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King Bushwich the 33rd
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 10, 2005
Posts: 1183
From: Ling Cod Beach, CA 90803
Posted: 2008-10-09 08:50 am   Permalink

2 L.A. T.V. Personalities from the early 60's

-Lloyd Thaxton: Dance show host
May 31, 1927- October 5, 2008
Los Angeles Time: LLoyd Thaxton

-Charles M. Runyon
August 10, 1922 - October 4, 2008
played the role of the happy-go-lucky Chucko the Birthday Clown

Los Angeles Times: Chucko the Birthday Clown

YouTube: Chucko the Birthday Clown

Official Chucko the Birthday Clown site: Are Clowns hatched?

[ This Message was edited by: KING BUSHWICH THE 33RD 2008-10-09 09:14 ]


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Heath
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Dec 31, 2005
Posts: 608
From: Suburban San Diego (The Drawer)
Posted: 2008-10-15 5:44 pm   Permalink

Neal Hefti 10/29/22-10/11/08
Composer of many songs including the theme to the Batman t.v. show.
International Herald Tribune article

bio on Space Age Pop Music

_________________


[ This Message was edited by: heath 2008-10-15 18:01 ]


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King Bushwich the 33rd
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 10, 2005
Posts: 1183
From: Ling Cod Beach, CA 90803
Posted: 2008-10-17 08:51 am   Permalink

-Frank "Lefty" Rosenthal
Sports handicapper and a former Las Vegas casino executive.

June 12, 1929 – October 13, 2008

The 1995 Martin Scorsese film, Casino, was inspired by Rosenthal's career in Las Vegas.

Los Angeles Times: Frank Rosenthal

-Edie Adams
Tony Award winning actress, singer, seductive pitch-lady for Muriel cigars, Broadways original Daisy Mae.

April 16, 1927 – October 15, 2008

Chicago Tribune: Edie Adams


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