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Tiki Central Forums » » Creating Tiki » » Tiki Carving » » Safety Thread...Read pg. 3
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Safety Thread...Read pg. 3
Loki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Nov 04, 2005
Posts: 541
From: Boca Raton, FL
Posted: 2006-02-03 12:41 pm   Permalink


Please take a moment to read through these important safety tips. Even if you have been carving for decades, it’s always a good idea to take a refresher course and jump start the ‘ole gray matter.

Wear the proper clothing.
•Loose clothing, dangling jewelry and long hair don’t belong in a wood shop. Make sure to tie up long hair.
•Dress comfortably but wear clothing that fits close to your body so clothing does not get caught or wrapped in moving machinery.
•Gloves are a good idea to wear for many projects; however, when using rotating power tools, it is a good idea not to wear them as they can easily become tangled into a spinning blade. The exception would be for chainsaw carving and gloves with self binding material should be worn.

Always wear shoes.
•The workshop is usually full of sharp items that can drop onto you feet.
•Chisels easily fall off work benches and can cause nasty cuts on the top of feet or plunge deep into your hand if you try and catch it.
•Chainsaw carvers should wear steel toe or reinforced boots.

Safety Glasses.
•Probably the most important safety rule out there.
•It only takes a few seconds to put them on.
•Keep safety glasses on at all times, even when working close up with small tools.
•Make sure they are ANSI approved and cover enough of your eyes for the task at hand.
•Many carvers wear regular glasses, so goggles or flip down face shields may be an appropriate alternative.
•When sanding, goggles may offer better protection for your eyes to keep dust out.
•Flip down clear plastic full face masks are another option when using high speed tools such as chainsaws and grinders.

Watch and Listen to your tools.
•Read and understand your instruction manuals before ever trying out a new tool. Many times tools are shipped without blades properly tightened and guards not installed.
•When using your tools make a mental note of how it sounds while operating under normal conditions.
•Know when something sounds loose or when a motor is working under stress.
•Turn off and unplug the tool before any maintenance is done. Always turn off and unplug any electric tool when you are finished.
•Fix the problem as soon as possible. Often times we forget about a tool with a problem and leave it until next time we need it, and forget it had a problem.
•Don’t take safety guards off and discontinue using tools with broken guards. They are there for a reason.
•Use the correct tool for the job. Certain blades are made for certain types of cutting and using the wrong blade for the wrong medium may cause damage to the project and damage to the user.



Escape Plan.
•Have a plan in case of an emergency. Tell someone you are going to be working with carving tools, chainsaws etc. and have them check in with you from time to time.
•If an accident occurs and 911 is not necessary, know the route to the nearest emergency care center.
•Have a phone handy in the workshop if you need to make an emergency call.


First Aid Kit
•Make sure your first aid kit is in an easily accessible place and always stocked with the necessary items. If you use something, replace it as soon as possible.
•Stock it with antiseptics, sterile gauze and band aids.

Ear plugs
•Like safety glasses this is an easy one to forget but easy to use.
•Inexpensive foam plugs or plugs that have a cord to wrap around your neck when not being used are good choices.
•Hearing loss is a cumulative issue. You don’t realize damage is being done until it’s too late.

Breath Easy
•Dust masks and respirators should be used, especially when sanding and using chemicals such as stains and urethanes. Many wood varieties contain volatile chemicals when in dust form and may cause respiratory problems and skin rashes.
•Make sure the dust mask you buy is rated for the work you are doing. Cheap masks may not block enough of the bad stuff. Make sure the mask is rated at least N95.

Chainsaw carving safety equipment
Take the time to properly equip yourself. Chainsaw accidents happen violently and quickly. Always be prepared.
•Steel toe boots
•Jeans
•Kevlar wrap around chaps
•Heavy leather gloves with chain stop material
•Safety glasses
•Ear protection
•Face screen/shield

Never handle more than one chisel in your hand at a time. Some carvers use a kevlar glove on their less dominate hand in case the chisel slips on the wood.

Use your Brain
•Concentrate on what your task.
•Know where the tool is on the wood and where it will go.
•Avoid distractions when working.
•Keep your eyes on the project and tools.
•If you get tired. STOP. Not only will your work suffer, but you may suffer when fatigue sets in.

Links
Wood Toxicity


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[ This Message was edited by: Loki 2006-03-08 07:08 ]

[ This Message was edited by: Loki 2006-03-08 07:12 ]


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Tikisgrl
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 03, 2005
Posts: 866
From: Lowell, Mass
Posted: 2006-02-04 06:00 am   Permalink

Hello,

I don't carve but I am in the Workers' Comp business so I see a lot of hand injuries as well as some truly odd "accidents".

I have a few things to add:

1) Don't forget about your hair!!! I know it sounds a bit odd but some of you carvers have long hair. Just like loose clothing believe it or not hair can get caught up in whirling spinning things quite easily. Long loose hair is a no-no in most machine shops for a reason.

2) Those tool bench skipping tools are another thing that causes injuries... Not moving is not off!!! Unplugged for electric tools is the only real off!! I like the idea of an on demand switch for power but I have seen way too many fingers cut by forgetting to Shut Down the Machine before the hand goes in to fix the problem!!! Much like trying to catch a chisel, if your brain doesn't perceive moving parts it's very easy to stick your hand in. It doesn't snow where most of you are but here when it's winter our Emergency rooms are full of Snow Blower injuries people stick their fingers in the chute... & you get the point... So if it the tool locks up or jams unplug it don't try to fix it until it's really off!!!

3) I don't know if they are even still made but they used to make a nice steel gauntlet glove for food service workers to prevent cut hands. If they still exist they could possibly work for your off hand for those tool skipping injuries. As I understood it they were thin and flexible and could be covered by a Nitrile glove.

Sorry couldn't resist... & just as a post script Walmart (I know they are evil) carries a pretty good line of Steel Toe shoes and boots that are very reasonably priced.

[ This Message was edited by: Tikisgrl 2006-02-04 06:17 ]


 
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Basement Kahuna
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Oct 14, 2002
Posts: 3591
From: Jawja Province, Isle of North America
Posted: 2006-02-04 1:30 pm   Permalink

I'm with Danny about working tired, or too drunk, or stoned. Not a good idea. Another rule is one chisel in one hand, never handle two at a time, ever. I wear a kevlar glove on my left hand a lot now. Also, keep super glue, alcohol, and bandaids around. I know, alcohol, but if you're a tiki carver after a while anyway you probably have a pain threshhold like a boxer. Superglue will close a cut really quick intil you can get further attention.... D. Basement Kahuna- Recipient of Purple Tiki with four extra awards...

 
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rodeotiki
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Joined: Jan 21, 2004
Posts: 1513
From: calgary
Posted: 2006-02-04 2:02 pm   Permalink

Thanks to everyone for the input and extra thanks to Loki for taking the time to re-write everything.

The only thing I would add is that I always make sure to clean up and unplug any power tools I have out. Even if I am just running in to get a drink. I always lock my tool box too. The reason for this is that I have small curios children around and would never forgive my self if something happened to one of them.

[ This Message was edited by: rodeotiki 2006-02-04 14:19 ]


 
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pdrake
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Joined: Jan 13, 2006
Posts: 1767
From: las vegas
Posted: 2006-02-04 2:13 pm   Permalink

Quote:
The reason for this is that I have small curios little ones around and would never forgive my self if something happened to one of them.



what? like hummels? ;-D


 
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Loki
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Joined: Nov 04, 2005
Posts: 541
From: Boca Raton, FL
Posted: 2006-03-15 08:53 am   Permalink

bump


 
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freddiefreelance
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Feb 15, 2003
Posts: 2991
From: San Diego, Ca.
Posted: 2006-03-15 09:02 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2006-02-03 12:41, Loki wrote:

Safety Glasses.
•Probably the most important safety rule out there.
•It only takes a few seconds to put them on.
•Keep safety glasses on at all times, even when working close up with small tools.
•Make sure they are ANSI approved and cover enough of your eyes for the task at hand.
•Many carvers wear regular glasses, so goggles or flip down face shields may be an appropriate alternative.
•When sanding, goggles may offer better protection for your eyes to keep dust out.
•Flip down clear plastic full face masks are another option when using high speed tools such as chainsaws and grinders.


Something to add about safety glasses: replace'em when they get scratched up. You don't have to buy new ones if you just get one scratch, but if you can only see what you're working on if you hold your head just so it's time for new glasses.
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Lake Surfer
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Joined: Oct 21, 2002
Posts: 3379
From: Milwaukee, WI
Posted: 2006-03-15 10:44 am   Permalink

Well prepared thread.

Funny how the brain works... even before an accident happens and you know you're going to hurt yourself, your hands continue to do the thing that will hurt you...

I obtained one of my Purple Tikis two years ago after a run in with the angle grinder...

Never plug it in while cradling it in your arms...



 
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Benzart
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Joined: Jan 09, 2004
Posts: 10365
From: Port Saint Lucie, Florida
Posted: 2006-03-15 3:34 pm   Permalink

Loki, this is a Much needed thread and I hope everyone reads it and adds a little if they can. Even if you don't follow all the well known safety rules, at least being aware of them helps.
I am probably the Worst offender since I have been carving probably longer than anyone around, but I still have all my fingers and toes. But Don't do as I do, do as I say and everyone Read this thread. Thanks Loki.



















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SilverLine
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Joined: Mar 02, 2004
Posts: 631
From: Kansas City
Posted: 2006-03-15 6:13 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2006-03-15 10:44, Lake Surfer wrote:Never plug it in while cradling it in your arms...



I literally jumped in my chair when I read that. But from the looks of your arm today, it could have been a LOT worse!


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Chairman Kaga
Member

Joined: Sep 15, 2004
Posts: 10
From: Saint Petersburg, FL
Posted: 2006-03-21 7:16 pm   Permalink

Any specific product recommendations for a cartridge respirator....for sanding ie particulate matter and basic painting/varnishing etc??

 
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Loki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Nov 04, 2005
Posts: 541
From: Boca Raton, FL
Posted: 2006-03-22 05:01 am   Permalink

Any mask that is rated N95 should be fine for sanding and varnishing. You dont need to get one of the big double respirators for that kind of work.

 
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pdrake
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 13, 2006
Posts: 1767
From: las vegas
Posted: 2006-04-12 2:41 pm   Permalink

well, there's a lot of good info here. most of it is related to large carving. i had a little accident while doing a small carving so i thought i'd add to this.

having a small vice to hold pieces 4" - 18" is a really good idea. if you're going to hold the piece in one hand and carve with the other, whether a fixed tool or power tool, put a glove on your holding hand.

if you're going to carve anything small in your lap with a blade, use a piece of thick, tooling leather as an apron. do it on a board if you want. those little blades are sharp and can cut quick as a wink. they bite into flesh deep.

carve smart. carve "s" mart.


 
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GMAN
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Joined: Jul 14, 2005
Posts: 2996
From: My Island
Posted: 2006-04-12 4:00 pm   Permalink

and....if you are carving pieces smaller than 14" and using a chainsaw....don't hold them with your feet like I do.

-Gman
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Chairman Kaga
Member

Joined: Sep 15, 2004
Posts: 10
From: Saint Petersburg, FL
Posted: 2006-04-13 3:23 pm   Permalink

Sorry to bump this but I thought it would fit here. I just picked up a new repirator (dual cartridge type) and I was wondering when do you know to replace the filters??

 
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