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Tiki Central Forums » » Collecting Tiki » » KAHIKI Columbus, ohio tiki bar restaurant. Lee Henry, The catalog
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KAHIKI Columbus, ohio tiki bar restaurant. Lee Henry, The catalog
tikiskip
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 26, 2005
Posts: 4446
Posted: 2014-12-14 1:55 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2014-12-12 07:53, Jeff Central wrote:
The person with the Hi Tiki items may be bringing it to the record convention this weekend to get my advice on them. I will have a table set up this weekend in Columbus.

Hopefully, I can take a few pictures and document what they have before they sell them. Heard they are prototypes and they are signed as well.

I will report back!



So what did you find Jeff?
Don't leave us hanging.
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Jeff Central
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 23, 2002
Posts: 1677
From: Columbus, Ohio
Posted: 2014-12-15 07:30 am   Permalink

Nothing! They never showed up!!



 
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tikiskip
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 26, 2005
Posts: 4446
Posted: 2014-12-15 07:46 am   Permalink

Yeah that's what I thought would happen.
Found it odd that they responded to you but never opened my PM or
even responded to this thread.
Plus would bet they got many PMs from TC.

Well if they do hit Ebay you know we all will in time hear about it
here on Tiki Central.
_______________________________________________________________________________
º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤ºº¤ø,¸¸,:*MERRY CHRISTMAS FROM TIKISKIP!!*:º¤ø,¸¸ø¤ºº¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º

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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11584
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2014-12-15 2:28 pm   Permalink

People outside of Tiki that happen upon items that seem to be of value Tiki crowd are a often fearful that they have this treasure that folks here are underpricing to then make a mint of themselves. They don't know how small the circle of rich collectors really is, and believe they have found an Antiques Roadshow treasure. It's understandable, but makes it difficult to communicate.

Or, Kohalacharms got to them and made them an offer they couldn't refuse


 
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tikiskip
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 26, 2005
Posts: 4446
Posted: 2014-12-15 4:09 pm   Permalink

"Or, Kohalacharms got to them and made them an offer they couldn't refuse"

HA! That's one even I did not think of.
Could be, But to not even respond or open other PMs makes no sense.
Ya know he's trying to make all he can, if he is in fact real.

Still say hoax, Have you ever noticed there are no bogus postings during Clown Conventions.

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kohalacharms
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Jan 29, 2004
Posts: 45
Posted: 2014-12-16 1:00 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2014-12-15 14:28, bigbrotiki wrote:
People outside of Tiki that happen upon items that seem to be of value Tiki crowd are a often fearful that they have this treasure that folks here are underpricing to then make a mint of themselves. They don't know how small the circle of rich collectors really is, and believe they have found an Antiques Roadshow treasure. It's understandable, but makes it difficult to communicate.

Or, Kohalacharms got to them and made them an offer they couldn't refuse




Et tu, Brute?


 
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tikiskip
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 26, 2005
Posts: 4446
Posted: 2014-12-16 1:53 pm   Permalink

Found this on the net.
Don't know if it's good or really Kahiki, but thought I would put it here and find out later.

The Kahiki’s Beef Ka Tiki

The Kahiki opened in 1960 in Columbus, Ohio, and was an immediate success. This recipe was published in a professional restaurant journal in 1963. Personally, I wouldn’t be too enthusiastic about the idea of boiling beef – or the catsup – or the sugar – or the cornstarch …

kahiki1½ lb lean beef, cut crossgrain and sliced
1½ lb chopped tomatoes
1 lb precooked green pepper, chopped
1 stalk of celery, chopped
1 medium yellow onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 cup tomato catsup
1 tsp salt
1 tbsp sugar
½ tsp seasoning powder
1 tbsp soy sauce
2 tbsp cornstarch, dissolved in ½ cup water
Saute onion, garlic, meat in skillet. Add green pepper, tomato, celery, cornstarch mixture, catsup, soy sauce, salt, sugar, and seasoning. Bring to boil. Simmer until the water has been absorbed and the mixture thickened. Makes 4 servings.


 
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tikiskip
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 26, 2005
Posts: 4446
Posted: 2014-12-28 3:46 pm   Permalink

More recipes from local paper 1969.


MAIN COURSE
CHICKEN PINEAPPLE KAHIKI
Wednesday, August 25, 2010
For Barb Jean Jolliff, Logan
Makes 2 servings

This recipe was in The Dispatch originally in 1969, supposedly from the executive chef at the Kahiki.
1 ripe pineapple
2 chicken breasts, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
1 tablespoon wine
1 1/2 cups water
1 green bell pepper, diced
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup vinegar
1/2 cup ketchup
Pinch of ground ginger
Pinch of garlic powder
1 teaspoon cornstarch
Cut the pineapple in half lengthwise. Cut the fruit from the shell, leaving 1/2-inch pineapple in the shell. Dice the fruit into 1/2-inch pieces. Discard the core.

Cook the meat and wine in a large deep skillet until browned. Add 1 cup water, diced pineapple and green pepper to skillet. Mix remaining water with sugar, vinegar, ketchup, ginger and garlic powder. Add to skillet. Place the two pineapple halves cut-side down over the mixture. Cook until the chicken is cooked through, about 5 minutes. Transfer pineapple shells to plates.

Mix cornstarch with a little water. Add to skillet. Cook until juices are thickened. Serve in pineapple shells.

Megan Galajda, Columbus

Editor’s note: Thanks to all who sent in this recipe.


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tikiskip
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 26, 2005
Posts: 4446
Posted: 2014-12-28 3:47 pm   Permalink

Recipe from 1971.

APPETIZER
KAHIKI’S SHRIMP POLYNESIAN
Wednesday, May 04, 2011
For C.K., Sidney

This recipe is from a book called All-Time Favorite Recipes from 1971.
Sauce:
1 cup ketchup
1 cup chili sauce
1 tablespoon sugar
Juice of 1/2 lemon
1 teaspoon dry mustard
1 teaspoon prepared horseradish
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

Shrimp:
1 cup flour
1 cup cornstarch
1 teaspoon baking powder
Pinch of salt
Pinch of sugar
2 eggs, well beaten
Milk
Water
Vegetable oil for frying
Shrimp, peeled, deveined
To make sauce: Combine all ingredients.

To make shrimp: Combine flour, cornstarch, baking powder, salt, sugar and eggs. Add equal amounts of milk and water to make a batter the consistency of pancake batter.

Pour enough oil into a heavy large pot to reach a depth of 3 inches. Heat to 350 degrees.

Split the body of the shrimp and open. Dip in batter. Add to hot oil. Fry to golden brown. Using a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels to drain.

Serve shrimp with sauce.

Joanne White, Columbus


-------------------------------------------------------------------------


JAI LAI RESTAURANT HERB BUTTER
1 pound butter
4 teaspoons lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried chives
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon dried rosemary
1 teaspoon dried tarragon



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[ This Message was edited by: tikiskip 2014-12-28 15:58 ]


 
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tikiskip
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 26, 2005
Posts: 4446
Posted: 2014-12-28 7:08 pm   Permalink

Q&A With the Authors of “Kahiki Supper Club: A Polynesian Paradise in Columbus”

By Jill Moorhead
From the Columbus Monthly magazine December 2014 edition

Book Excerpt: Back to the Kahiki

Writing about Columbus history is a family affair for father-daughter team David Meyers and Elise Meyers Walker. Together, the two have covered the Ohio Penitentiary and the one-time heart of downtown Columbus, the Lazarus store. In their newest collaboration, the pair has teamed up with Kahiki enthusiasts Jeff Chenault and Doug Motz to bring another institution back to life.

Why write about the Kahiki?

Elise: For our previous book, we found that everyone has a Lazarus story. We were looking for something in that vein.

David: Several days a week, I go to the main library Downtown. Doug Motz was managing the gift shop and said we should [write about] the Kahiki. Then Jeff [Chenault] would come see us when doing book signings. He said that we should do a book about Kahiki and introduced us to the Fraternal Order of Moai.

Elise: We’re tourists in this Kahiki world. They’re living it.

Can you share any personal memories?

Elise: One of the pictures in the book is from my 10th birthday. This would have been 1993, after [original owner] Bill Sapp sold it. I distinctly remember wanting to go there for my birthday and loving it.

It was a tiki bar that appealed to children, too.

Elise: Kahiki had birds, fish, a rainforest and a kids’ menu. There are a number of pictures in the book of Bill Sapp’s daughter when she was young.

David: We had a story of another girl whose parents went late in the evening, and she would sleep up in the offices.

Who worked at the Kahiki?

David: Kahiki was reflective of the community at the time. The female staff that came to work there were the brides of service men.

Elise: People from a number of different countries were trying to pass off as Polynesians. There were a lot of Cuban refugees.

David: In the book, we reproduce an application for a job. It’s as simple as it gets.

Elise: It’s a file card: name, age, uniform size and when you’re ready to work.

Let’s talk about tiki mugs. The Kahiki made its own pottery?

Elise: Bill Sapp’s wife, Marcy, started out designing the pottery. It was loosely based on stuff they’d seen when they were traveling.

David: She was a model, but she was also an artist. She took it upon herself to design it all. They were going to have the mystery bowls made in Mexico and shipped here. They all arrived broken, so she just started making them in the basement in the Kahiki. When it was beyond her ability, they contracted out to a local company. When Bill Sapp sold his interest in the restaurant, he didn’t keep any of that stuff. There are collectors of tiki ceramics, and all the stuff that’s out there, it’s all hot.

Elise: It’s all stolen. There was no legal sale.

Did you interact at all with Kahiki (frozen) Foods?

David: We had contact with Michael Tsao, the last owner of the restaurant. We were in touch with their sons. They were interested, but then not. Kahiki Foods is owned by a holding company in Pittsburgh. The company decided to make the break.

Elise: There’s always resentment for the last owner of something. It’s like what we’re seeing at Olympic [Swim Club]. The community lashes out because it’s historic, even when they can’t keep the building afloat. Kahiki was a large building with a lot of maintenance.

David: And most importantly, Kahiki hadn’t turned a profit, so they didn’t have the money to stay open. As much as he wanted to, there wasn’t community support from politicians, and [Tsao] didn’t have the money to do it anyway. And then he died. Any hope of reopening died with him.
________________________________________________________________________________

"There are collectors of tiki ceramics, and all the stuff that’s out there, it’s all hot.

Elise: It’s all stolen. There was no legal sale."

See that's does not sound right as in very early photo's of the gift shop you can see mugs
even table lamps for sale.
But then this is a case of people who are writers looking for a subject to write about
and not writing about a true love or interest they have/had.

But then this Q and A is with David Meyers and Elise Meyers not Jeff.
I think Jeff would have known better than that.

Plus I knew once I put the name of my restaurant on my ashtrays that they would
be stolen.
Was more amazed at how long it took to get them all stolen.

But then THAT"S why you put your name on it so when it's out of your place you get
the advertising.
















[ This Message was edited by: tikiskip 2014-12-28 19:23 ]


 
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umeone
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 26, 2005
Posts: 163
Posted: 2014-12-29 1:51 pm   Permalink

To clear up a few misconceptions regarding the comments by Elise were, in fact, quoted by both dad and Lee. I can't believe that anyone would think that because an article had the Kahiki name on it would make people think that the owners put it out for the purpose of someone stealing it. That's absurd.

What Elise was implying was the amount of plates, Compotes,Sterling Silver knives, forks, spoons,soup bowls, Idols Cast mugs, and the Mystery bowls were stripped by thieves and was not put out for advertisement in someone's home. The Blue Hurricane glasses were so expensive ($6.00 a glass in 1961)and stolen so fast that the Kahiki quit using a very unique and beautiful glass and it did not have the Kahiki name or emblem on it.

Yes, there were items sold in the gift shop such as the Port and Starboard Light glasses, but certainly not to the extent of the fine pieces that was presented to the customer.

The ashtrays and the Zombie mugs were made at the Kahiki and had the Kahiki name on it, but again, was not made or used for the customer to steal.

If a restaurant has a cheap, clear ashtray used by many businesses still does not give a person the right to assume it is acceptable to slip something that does not belong to them into their pocket or purse.

We actually caught some idiot trying to steal the 200 lb. ashtray urn that was sitting in the lobby.

Jeff was at the interview and was surprised by some of the stories of theft, robberies, and fights within the Kahiki as well as some of the other info that you will find by reading their book!

The book and stories are in fact the words of Bill Sapp and Lee Henry, two legacies
that did not embellish the stories but rather spoke from the heart and of their love of the Kahiki.




 
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tikiskip
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 26, 2005
Posts: 4446
Posted: 2014-12-29 6:19 pm   Permalink

Saw that coming.

IT SAYS.

"and all the stuff that’s out there, it’s all hot."

Elise: "It’s all stolen. There was no legal sale."

It's ALL hot.
It's ALL stolen.
NO legal sale.
And what I said was...
"See that's does not sound right as in very early photo's of the gift shop you can see mugs
even table lamps for sale"

AND if none of it was for sale AND none got stolen then NONE would be out there today.
Because they would have slowly been broken by your staff.
AND since you have said that the family saved nothing from the Kahiki
then if not for the stealing of items like Idols Cast mugs and others there
would be none left.
The people who stole the stuff saved it and kept it well for all to have later.
Yes it was wrong.

When asked about my "cheap, clear ashtray" I gave them one even though I did not have the
huge mark up on my food as some restaurants.
But then I loved my place so that I kept a few ashtrays and even other stuff from my restaurant.

The Kahiki had a HUGE collection of tiki joint stuff like the Mai Kai bowl I had from the 60s
don't know where all that stuff came from and don't know where it is today.
That's who I bought it from, the Kahiki, after Mr. Taso died.

So the fact that some of these items walked out the door is why they live on today.

AND I said the writers did not have a true love or interest in Kahiki / tiki not Bill or Lee.




 
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tikiskip
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 26, 2005
Posts: 4446
Posted: 2014-12-29 7:02 pm   Permalink

This is my old pal Soung.
He worked at the Kahiki for many years.

He's even in the video I gave you Umeone.
But I went to his Christmas party and he gave me some recipes, well we
traded, but they are old and even Xeroxed from the wall of the Kahiki.

Got a photo of them cuz when it's gone it's gone.
They say that Jim was the only one who could make the Navy Grog mix after Kay left at the Kahiki.
Plus when Jim made it the batch would last about one year.



 
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umeone
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 26, 2005
Posts: 163
Posted: 2014-12-30 03:40 am   Permalink

Tikiskip,
We actually found your response very amusing. An owner of any business should be grateful for theft in order to preserve the name of an establishment is a good one. Yes, you didn't say grateful, I know.

The Kahiki name is loved and revered by any person that was in the Kahiki.

There was no reference to your restaurant or what you used, gave away or was stolen.

You are correct in the fact that 3 of the writers do not share in the tiki feelings as Jeff has. Jeff was in all of the interviews with most of the people that was providing info.


What Elise was referring to was the huge amount of theft that the Kahiki incurred.

WE are grateful to all 4 writers that brought the history of the Kahiki to its many followers.

Kahiki followers, please read the book and don't be distracted by a few comments.


 
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tikiskip
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 26, 2005
Posts: 4446
Posted: 2014-12-30 06:00 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2014-12-30 03:40, umeone wrote:
Tikiskip,
We actually found your response very amusing. An owner of any business should be grateful for theft in order to preserve the name of an establishment is a good one. Yes, you didn't say grateful, I know.

The Kahiki name is loved and revered by any person that was in the Kahiki.

There was no reference to your restaurant or what you used, gave away or was stolen.

You are correct in the fact that 3 of the writers do not share in the tiki feelings as Jeff has. Jeff was in all of the interviews with most of the people that was providing info.


What Elise was referring to was the huge amount of theft that the Kahiki incurred.

WE are grateful to all 4 writers that brought the history of the Kahiki to its many followers.

Kahiki followers, please read the book and don't be distracted by a few comments.



"An owner of any business should be grateful for theft in order to preserve the name of an establishment is a good one. Yes, you didn't say grateful"

Well not grateful, But you know that theft goes on at restaurants by staff and customers.
Heck you were a bartender you must have seen it, you never gave away drinks or saw other bartenders
do the same.
That's theft, bartenders give booze to their "best" customer (Read tipper) and he then turns it into
a tip for the bartender.
Wait staff does this with food.
Other workers just dive in your cash box and take a money bath at your expense.

While in the back the dishwasher is throwing away your silverware and smashing the dishware all
day long.

But you know it goes on and that's why you need to keep a watchful eye, the old joints, the ones who make money you will see the owner right by the cash register.
Plus it takes only one week, heck less to learn this.
So put out cool stuff in your place and hope it lasts and keep an eye out and know in time
it's going to be tossed out or broken or yes stolen.
That's why you put things like this in your food costs like rent and help, costs of goods.
But then being a person who ran a restaurant you know this.


I'm not condoning the thefts but the one good that came out of them is the preservation of the
very Kahiki items you and I seek.

"What Elise was referring to was the huge amount of theft that the Kahiki incurred"
Ok fine, but that's not what she said in this Q and A, and that's what I said in my post that you went off on.

I did go on the first interview Jeff did for Tiki mag and was lucky to talk to your dad at the HRHH
and a few other times.
Even have the first uncut article Jeff did for tiki mag with the notes I took.







 
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