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Tiki Central Forums Creating Tiki Other Crafts Tiki mugs by hmc
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Tiki mugs by hmc
TikiJosh
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Joined: Feb 01, 2005
Posts: 735
Posted: 2006-02-19 3:43 pm   Permalink

This is a really cool thread. I'm intrigued enough to give this a shot at some point. What sort of tools do you use for the clay sculpt (I'm not much of a clay person). Do the tools at a normal craft/hobby shop suffice or do you have to go somewhere special?
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hmc
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 09, 2006
Posts: 122
From: Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Posted: 2006-02-19 4:07 pm   Permalink

Thank you all!

Rum Demon:
-This is my first mold ever!
-There's certainly no problems with gauging the silicon master, all concentrated efforts go to creating the part line - you can knock this guy around as much as you like.
-I didn't do a splash coat. Not familiar with that one, although it'd be worth a try. I just poured it straight in - at the lowest point and VERY slowly to ensure all (most) bubbles disappear.
-LOVE the "pry points" idea, I'll definitely be doing that one next time.
-Thanks for your input and advice, glad you're liking this thread and adding to it too!

hodadhank: the silicon master will last a very long time indeed. Not sure how long but I'm guessing many years.

TikiJosh: I used lino cutting tools and a couple of sculpting tools from the art shop for the clay master. Nothing too special!

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hmc
Helen McLean


[ This Message was edited by: hmc 2006-02-19 16:09 ]


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teaKEY
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Nov 09, 2004
Posts: 3664
From: The thumb !
Posted: 2006-02-19 6:49 pm   Permalink

This is the best thread and most useful in a long time here for me. Heck, I don't need to win a Mug Making contest, I can just make the mug. And in no time. It would be nice to have the backing and support of a major company but the rewards for making something with your own hands is also as good.

I have never heard of making a silicone positive (the mug) but its just as cool. ((Don't let his fall into the wrong hands )) A fired positive probably would work?. Two less steps.

The next steps are the mystery to me. I never could understand how a thin wall of clay is formed to the negative (plaster). I heard that there is a machine that pumps?? Again, Unsure, never have done a mold. The only way that I could think it would be possibly would be to spin the mold and have the G-forces pull the clay to the outside. I know that this is not how it's done.

Very interested in all that you have shown and certainly the next step, as well as the final product. I already know its going to be a great mug. Thanks for showing us the light even if no one make a mug. But since this is your first its very encouraging for me and others to make ours.
-teaKEY


 
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rodeotiki
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Joined: Jan 21, 2004
Posts: 1513
From: calgary
Posted: 2006-02-19 7:02 pm   Permalink

Silly question ? When you do the second pour , what keeps the plaster from sticking to the first pour ? And how do you get the 2 halfs apart after to get the silicone one out?

Great job so far and thanks for the detailed photos.


 
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Bete
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Joined: Jan 01, 2006
Posts: 490
Posted: 2006-02-19 7:17 pm   Permalink

MauiTiki, that mug you did that you posted a page back just rocks, that design is so awesome!

 
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Bete
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Joined: Jan 01, 2006
Posts: 490
Posted: 2006-02-19 7:17 pm   Permalink

On a side note, this is a way cool thread, what talent you people have.

 
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MauiTiki
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Joined: Jan 20, 2003
Posts: 693
From: A rock in the middle of the Ocean
Posted: 2006-02-19 10:32 pm   Permalink

Helen,

You've got us all fired up to try this on our own. I never thought about using someone elses kiln. I actually have a friend that has a kiln, so I may have to try this. There seems to be some interest in my mug, but only 4 were made. And they were not made by me, only the initial design (which I entered in the TC mug contest).

I poured some cement into a plastic tiki wall hanging (you know the kind you get at Hilo Hattie for $5) that I had in the garage, and it came out great, so I'm ready for mold making. I may have some silicone questions for you in the next few weeks. Living on a rock in the middle of the ocean, I'm kind of limited on what I can get at my local art supply store.

keep the photos comming!!! Will you be making enough to sell?


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MauiTiki

Tiki and flower pattern Stickers
www.stuckonmaui.com
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hmc
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Joined: Jan 09, 2006
Posts: 122
From: Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Posted: 2006-02-20 02:26 am   Permalink

teaKEY: The rewards ARE the best thing out of all this, you are right. A fired master (positive) probably would work, yes 2 less steps. You will however need to add a release agent or coat/finish the piece before pouring plaster onto it otherwise it will bond to the porous surface of you fired piece. Rather than explain the next steps to you now, I will be posting the pics and info within the next day or two (knowing me, probably tomorrow!). Suffice to say, there's no spinning or pumping or machinery. Just pour the ceramic slip mix into the gaping hole, let dry until the desired thickness is achieved - then pour it out. I'll explain why/how this works later. Thank you for your words of encouragement as well, I'm glad you are getting something out of this!!!

rodeotiki: Not a silly question! I'm not sure if you need to put anything onto the first pour after it has hardened (maybe Rum Demon and Mrs Rum Demon can shed some light here). I couldn't find any info on it and the shop was closed the day I needed to find out. But rather than risk the two binding together, I just smeared some petroleum jelly over it and it didn't stick. I have a feeling I didn't have to do this, but I didn't want to risk it after so much hard work!

MauiTiki: Wow, only 4 mugs of that wonderful design. I'm very happy to hear that my thread has inspired you to make more yourself!!! Considering you live on a rock just check out the Polytek website and see which location of theirs is closest to your rock, in case you decide to go down the silicon path.
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hmc
Helen McLean


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teaKEY
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Nov 09, 2004
Posts: 3664
From: The thumb !
Posted: 2006-02-20 07:59 am   Permalink

I see this thread as a HMC learning experience but also a place for all to join together to share the mug love.

MauiTiki, with you having only four production made mugs, is that a record for lowest production # ever. I think thats cool. If I was the richest man I would have companies like Munktiki make a production number of three and then destroy the mold. I can only dream. I would love one of your mugs but its just as sweet having so few that they are so special.

Rodeo, I was wondering that same question and forgot to ask.

Hmc, I thought that you were going to make part of the mold(-) in silicone for the longer lasting effect? I have heard of a layer of silicone on top of a bed of plaster(the mother?) In my mind, it would make it very easy for "peeling" off the mold if necessary. Don't rush for us. Enjoy yourself out there.

Ps I think I know what you are talking about for the next step


 
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Rum Demon
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Joined: Jun 20, 2005
Posts: 254
From: Portland, Oregon
Posted: 2006-02-20 09:39 am   Permalink

HMC, you did the exact right thing putting vaseline on the first half of your mold. It does need something else the two sides will be nearly impossible to part and you'll end up chipping and crumbling your mold as you struggle to open the damn thing. There are fancy mold releases and silicon sprays you can buy for this step, but petroleum jelly works pretty well and is much cheaper.

Have you opened the mold yet? I worry a bit about your keys. Instead of straight up and down, I use more of a tapered edged key: /\ If you've already opened your mold and all is fine, then it'll probably be ok. I just worry that one or two of your keys might stick and break off into it's "keyhole".

I'm also curious to see what your pour times are like.

Everyone else: Stone molds are dry and porous so when liquid clay is poured into them they immediately begin to pull the moisture out of your slip, leaving clay sticking nicely to it's surface. The longer you leave slip in a mold, the thicker the walls of your mug will be.

My usual pour time is about an hour. I read it should only be 15 minutes or so, but found that to be terribly insufficient. There have been a few times where I've gotten sidetracked and left slip in for two hours or more. These are some HEFTY mugs!

Also, I don't do much of anything to prepare the mold for the slip pour except spritz the inside surfaces with water to minimize bubbles. I'm told talc keeps the work from sticking to the sides but have never had a sticking problem. After pouring out the excess slip, I turn the mold upside down for a few minutes to keep the really liquid bits inside from settling too much to the bottom. Then I set the thing aside for about 12 hours or so, the clay dries and pulls itself away from the mold.

I'm not saying that any of this is the RIGHT way to do things, it's just what I've found works. I know of people who pull the mugs right out, but mine always collapse and/or deform if I pull them out too soon.

Then of course, you're on to cleanup......

So anyway, take lots of pictures of your next step! We all look forward to it!

take care,
-Joe
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MUGS MUGS MUGS!!! Now on Etsy!
rumdemon.etsy.com

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badmojo
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Joined: Apr 23, 2003
Posts: 666
Posted: 2006-02-20 10:01 am   Permalink

Maybe I'm missing something, but isn't the area below the side of the mouth going to be an undercut, and make it hard, if not impossible to remove the mug afterwards?


 
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teaKEY
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Nov 09, 2004
Posts: 3664
From: The thumb !
Posted: 2006-02-20 10:56 am   Permalink

Undercuts is a big deal and it does look that way with the mouth. I hope thats not the case.

 
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Rum Demon
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 20, 2005
Posts: 254
From: Portland, Oregon
Posted: 2006-02-20 11:36 am   Permalink

Good eye. Primo had some serious undercut problems at first. I grossly overestimated the amount that the mug would shrink in the mold. Scraping the trouble spots on the mold away with an exacto knife got rid of most of the problem, the rest is generally repaired in the cleanup phase. Yes, the better the mold the easier and quicker the cleanup.

I was still sculpting Fred at this point and gave him the necessary adjustments to make for an easier pull. A good lesson learned.

Meanwhile, Pina Diablo was made with a FIVE part mold! So no undercutting problems there. Coconut and Alien use four part molds. But that's a whole new story...

The good news here is that HMC is using a silicon master and can just toss the mold if it sucks and try again, no harm done to the original art.

-Joe
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MUGS MUGS MUGS!!! Now on Etsy!
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hmc
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Joined: Jan 09, 2006
Posts: 122
From: Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Posted: 2006-02-20 12:43 pm   Permalink

badmojo: YES you are right! I either need to re-asses my part line or just clean up each mug after they've dried a bit. Doh!

I haven't decided what to do yet....
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hmc
Helen McLean


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cheekytiki
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Joined: Mar 09, 2004
Posts: 1091
From: The Haole Hut, London, UK
Posted: 2006-02-20 1:01 pm   Permalink

HMC, with the mold makers I have used they usually make a seperate part of the mold for the foot as that is an under cut in itself.
I suddenly feel like one in a line of people pointing out mistakes, but I had about 5 goes at the master for my first mug before I even got the design to a point that was makeable.
The Slip as you probably know will shrink as it dries , so small undercuts can just about pull out.
Keep up the Hardwork


 
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