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Tiki Central Forums Tiki Drinks and Food The Mai Tai, a component study in Mixology
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The Mai Tai, a component study in Mixology
pappythesailor
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Joined: Jul 07, 2005
Posts: 1566
From: Mass.
Posted: 2006-07-10 7:18 pm   Permalink

Citrus tends to go through a virtual sorting process the farther you get from citrus country. By the time it's picked over by every state from FLA to MASS, some pretty tiny specimens remain. You never get a key lime this far north. (That's life. We get nice apples, Chip & Andy are blessed with good citrus.) You have to get limes at BJ's Wholesale Club. If you buy them at the supermarket, you get screwed.

Even the limes we get around here are sweet compared to lime-like plastic things they sell in the produce department. They may be small but they're tolerable good. Anyhoo, I use the 1940's solid glass citrus juicer. I never thought about squeezing the rind; great idea! A good excuse to bring a Juice King home from the flea market.


 
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Chip and Andy
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Joined: Jul 13, 2004
Posts: 2277
From: Corner table, Molokai Lounge, Mai-Kai.
Posted: 2006-07-11 04:38 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2006-07-10 19:18, pappythesailor wrote:
Even the limes we get around here are sweet compared to lime-like plastic things they sell in the produce department.



Here is something unexpected.... As you move north the limes change not only in availability but in overall taste. That sort of makes sense because most limes (most produce) is picked under-ripe for shipping.

Quote:

On 2006-07-10 09:09, KuKuAhu wrote:
And I think the Persian oil content as mentioned above is a huge plus.



And, we need to consider not just the insides of the lime. The oils from the peel are offering part of the aroma which then becomes part of the taste. This is why so many of the bottled lime juices seem flat when compared to fresh. The bottled stuff is a good alternative when you don't have fresh, and we will have to see what we can do to the other ingredients to make up for the missing component of the oils of the peel.

Quote:

On 2006-07-10 07:53, freddiefreelance wrote:
Also, are you going to discuss Garnishes? There's different kinds of Mint & Pineapple to discuss after Mai-Tai Class is over.



Thank you Freddiefreelance for re listing your horticultural listing of the limes, that post was part of the inspiration to start this quest. And yes, we will discuss garnishing your new found knowledge. Start looking for some mint......

Has anyone tried any of the frozen alternatives to lime? And, before we move on does anyone else have anything to share about thier lime options and tastes?
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cheekytiki
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Joined: Mar 09, 2004
Posts: 1095
From: The Haole Hut, London, UK
Posted: 2006-07-11 05:21 am   Permalink

http://www.funkin.co.uk do a lime juice that I have tried which is good, but I can't seem to find it on their website.

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Loki
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Joined: Nov 04, 2005
Posts: 541
From: Boca Raton, FL
Posted: 2006-07-11 06:48 am   Permalink

If you still have some pulp left in the shell, a few seconds in the microwave will will yield a few more precious drops of juice.
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rugbymatt
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Joined: Jun 03, 2005
Posts: 1205
From: Sacramento
Posted: 2006-07-11 08:56 am   Permalink

Unga,

I think it was a grad level course at some universities.



 
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thejab
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 2987
From: Tradewinds Apartments, Alameda, CA
Posted: 2006-07-11 10:49 am   Permalink

I don't think using the shells or the rind is a good idea. The rind is the bitterest part of citrus. The zest (outer green part of the peel) contains the oils so it can add a lot of flavor and aroma, but avoid using the rind.

 
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Tikiwahine
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Joined: Apr 09, 2003
Posts: 3293
From: Victoria, BC
Posted: 2006-07-11 11:43 am   Permalink

I don't shake with the shell, but I sometimes shake with mint.

How should one go about fishing these extra bits out from the shaker? Especially if you're using them as garnish, fingers can be uncouth when those other than close friends are imbibing.
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Blue Thunder
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Joined: Apr 06, 2006
Posts: 115
From: San Diego
Posted: 2006-07-11 3:58 pm   Permalink

I don't like to shake the lime shells in the shaker. I prefer to squeeze the lime skin onto the mint leaves and surface of drink to get the smell of the oils with out the bitterness.
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Chip and Andy
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Joined: Jul 13, 2004
Posts: 2277
From: Corner table, Molokai Lounge, Mai-Kai.
Posted: 2006-07-11 6:05 pm   Permalink

OK, lets see if this sums up the limes acceptably:

Fresh limes have a livelier taste that comes from the oils in the skin. Bottled lime has a 'cleaner,' or maybe 'more clear' taste, even if it is missing some of the 'life' of fresh. And, like most things fresher is better. Choose fresh limes over bottled when the option exists. We will discuss later how to overcome any shortcomings of bottled juice.

Shall we move on to the next component? Please continue to tell us about your lime tastings as we add the next flavor...

Orgeat

Orgeat is a syrup made from almonds, sugar and rose water or orange-flower water. It is not the easiest syrup to find, but it is easier to find now because you can order it from Trader Vic's website. If you haven't ordered some, or made your own, don't worry as this flavor has many alternative sources, most noticeably the Torani Almond syrup. Please pour yourself a wee dram of your almond options and share with us what brand/style you have and your descriptions of the taste:

Again, I'll start. I am using Trader Vic's Orgeat. The aroma reminds me of sugar cookies, or maybe the marzipan fruits that my grandparents used to bring at Christmas. I know that marzipan is almond so that is not a reach, but that is what comes to mind when I smell orgeat. It has a sticky quality to it both in consistency and in flavor as taken straight (or with some soda) the flavor tends to linger. It is not overly sweet, it has a richness more than a sweetness.
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Kona Chris
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Joined: Jul 16, 2005
Posts: 241
From: Tucson, AZ
Posted: 2006-07-12 03:51 am   Permalink

My only experience with orgeat is the Trader Vic's syrup, and I REALLY like the flavor. I like a bit more of it in my Mai Tai's than is called for in the classic recipe. As a 1/4oz is a bit difficult to measure, I've converted it to tablespoons.
1oz=2TBs
1/4oz=1/2TBS

So instead of using a half tablespoon, I usually use at least two teaspoons.

The TV's syrup is pretty easy to get around here, and I've yet to see the Torani, so I can't make any comments on that. I would be interested in a direct comparison between the two.

Although I have to say, the flavor component I'm really looking forward to a discussion of is the Curacao. I've yet to buy any, and have been using Patron Citronage for right now.

Chris


 
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Chip and Andy
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Joined: Jul 13, 2004
Posts: 2277
From: Corner table, Molokai Lounge, Mai-Kai.
Posted: 2006-07-12 04:15 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2006-07-12 03:51, Kona Chris wrote:
... and I've yet to see the Torani, so I can't make any comments on that. I would be interested in a direct comparison between the two....



I am even more interested to see if anyone has tried and compared the Sugar-Free Torani Syrups.
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pablus
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Joined: Jul 23, 2003
Posts: 2156
From: www.crazedmugs.com
Posted: 2006-07-12 05:23 am   Permalink


I find that Torani orgeat syrup is sweet enough to forego using rock candy syrup.
It's got a powerful almond taste and not so much of the orange blossoms that are supposed to be present.



 
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GatorRob
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Joined: Aug 20, 2004
Posts: 1784
From: Orlando
Posted: 2006-07-12 08:50 am   Permalink

I have only tried Trader Vic's so I have no point of comparison. I would like to try Monin Orgeat, but have only found it once before and the price was too high. But there is a short thread over HERE that compares the various brands.

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Hakalugi
Site Administrator

Joined: Aug 10, 2004
Posts: 3423
From: Redondo Beach, CA
Posted: 2006-07-12 09:09 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2006-07-12 05:23, pablus wrote:

I find that Torani orgeat syrup is sweet enough to forego using rock candy syrup.
It's got a powerful almond taste and not so much of the orange blossoms that are supposed to be present.





Agreed.


Here's what I posted once before in another thread:

Right now I have a bottle of the Trader Vic's orgeat and the Torani orgeat.

The TV's is thicker and seems to have a hint of citrus blended in with the almonds.

The Torani's is more watery and has a very pronounced almond flavor. It smells and tastes much like marzipan. In fact I don't notice any flavor other than almond.

Orgeat should be a mixture of almonds, sugar and rose water/orange-flower water, and the TV's seems to be going the orange-flower route.

And now for the purely subjective part:
In my Mai Tai's I prefer the taste of the TV's orgeat. I feel that the Torani is too one dimensional and candy like and can easily overpower the balance of flavors.




 
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Swanky
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Joined: Apr 03, 2002
Posts: 5276
From: Hapa Haole Hideaway, TN
Posted: 2006-07-12 09:40 am   Permalink

Nice article on orgeat if you care to read. And a recipe to make your own.
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