FEATURES | MUSIC | BOOKS | DRINKS | FORUMS | GAMES | LINKS | ABOUT


advertise on Tiki Central

Celebrating classic and modern Polynesian Pop
  [Edit Profile]  [Edit Preferences]  [Search] [Sign Up]
[Personal Messages]  [Member List]  [Help/FAQ]  [Rules]  [Login]
Tiki Central Forums Tiki Drinks and Food The Mai Tai, a component study in Mixology
Goto page ( Previous Page 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 Next Page )
The Mai Tai, a component study in Mixology
KuKuAhu
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Dec 23, 2002
Posts: 567
From: Kahiki, Ohio
Posted: 2006-07-17 09:12 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2006-07-14 21:31, martiki wrote:
Vic's locations never shake the shell, and neither did the Trader. Peel oil is aromatic, but can be bitter in too high a dose. Hand squeezing the shell will bring the oils to the surface so when placed on top of the Mai Tai, it will provide the aromas without the bitter taste. Vic himself only added the shell after shaking for color, but the perfumy quality, along with the mint, is excellent.



Well there you go. A definitive answer from a former Vic's bartender. Excellent! Frankly I was never fond of fishing the shells out of the shaker anyway. This makes life easier and leaves more room in the shaker. Still, I may make my own that way though. But I prefer mine a little bitter and sour... Just like me.




Ahu


 
View Profile of KuKuAhu Send a personal message to KuKuAhu  Email KuKuAhu Goto the website of KuKuAhu     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Digitiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 22, 2004
Posts: 756
From: L.A. baby!
Posted: 2006-07-17 11:24 am   Permalink

Just wanted to chime in here and say, I love this thread! I've been following it and it is full of very good detailed info! Cheers!

 
View Profile of Digitiki Send a personal message to Digitiki      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
GatorRob
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 20, 2004
Posts: 1784
From: Orlando
Posted: 2006-07-18 3:43 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2006-07-14 21:31, martiki wrote:
Vic's locations never shake the shell, and neither did the Trader.


Martiki, thanks for the great post. VERY informative! I have a show recorded here off the Food Network on cocktails. The host goes into Trader Vic's Beverly Hills and meets the manager and a bartender. They show the bartender making a Mai Tai and darn if he doesn't shake the thing WITH the shell. He places the shell on top of the ice and pours all liquids over the shell, then puts a Boston shaker over the whole thing, shakes it, dumps it back in the glass and adds the standard garnishes. So the shell ends up near the bottom under all the ice. Is he a rogue Vic's bartender or maybe that's how they do it in the 90210 zip?

Quote:

Trader Vic's- the older locations- use a plier like device which is hard on the hands, but works beautifully with fresh limes- out of seasons are tough.


He used that plier device on the show. Looks like juice was squirting everywhere though.

If I can find a free video editor, I'll post the clip on youtube.com.


 
View Profile of GatorRob Send a personal message to GatorRob      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Kona Chris
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 16, 2005
Posts: 241
From: Tucson, AZ
Posted: 2006-07-18 10:51 pm   Permalink

I have one of the plier devices, and I don't know if it's just the one I have, or what, but it's about the most useless and painful tool I've ever tried. It pales in comparison to using one of those fold over squeezers.

Also count me as a fan of the Bearss seedless limes.

Chris


 
View Profile of Kona Chris Send a personal message to Kona Chris      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
mbanu
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Aug 02, 2005
Posts: 84
Posted: 2006-07-19 07:10 am   Permalink

On rum:

Finding the exact mix just isn't possible if you've never had the 17-year old original, or at least a bottle of Vic's Mai Tai rum to base your mix off. You can't just go by country because distillation practices change. I'm pretty sure that your average Jamaican rum of yesteryear isn't quite the same as your average Jamaican of today. Any heavy-bodied aged rum will probably make a good drink, though.

On curacao: Doesn't really matter which one you use, but make sure it's liquor-strength (40% abv) or very close, and not one of those low-proof creme de orange liqueurs in disguise.

On sweeteners: It may be a pain, but it's important to use the orgeat/sugar syrup blend instead of straight orgeat. One of the big dangers with all tiki drinks is that you have so many flavors fighting for dominance that all the high and low notes get drowned out. Using the syrup blend allows the character of the base rum to shine through more.

On limes: Use fresh, of course.

On shaking: Shake the crap out of it. Any good Mai Tai recipe takes ice dilution into account, and once the Mai Tai is as cold as the surrounding ice, no more ice will melt. It's impossible to overshake a good Mai Tai. As stated previously, don't shake with the shell.

On presentation:

Make sure to leave a bit of juice in the lime shell you use for garnish. The idea behind that is so if the person prefers their Mai Tais a bit more tart, they can pick the lime shell back up and adjust the tartness themselves.

Make sure the Old-fashioned glass you use doesn't have a over-wide rim. How much is too much depends on the size of lime you're using, but it should fill a healthy portion of the glass if you want to get the garnish effect right.

Garnished correctly, the lime half with spearmint sprig should look a bit like a desert island with a palm tree. The Mai Tai itself should just come up to the edge of the lime, enough to enhance the effect, but not so much that the lime can't be taken out without getting your fingers wet. Just make sure to use enough ice to make a solid base for the lime to rest on. Make sure to use fresh spearmint, it has the best aroma.

Straw or not is anyone's guess, but if you do go with a straw, cut it short. Helps keep the nose catch the scent of the mint.




[ This Message was edited by: mbanu 2006-07-19 07:11 ]


 
View Profile of mbanu Send a personal message to mbanu      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
cheekytiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 09, 2004
Posts: 1095
From: The Haole Hut, London, UK
Posted: 2006-07-19 10:36 am   Permalink

On the 17Yo, apparently, to set the story straight, Trader Vics rum was 17 YO J. Wray and Nephew but was never known as 17YO. It was called 'Trader Vics Personal Selection',
I learnt this recently from Joy Spence , Appletons Master Blender who presented TVs Londondon with a 35cl bottle at this years Luau.
The Rum is a very Dark Redish brown with a very strong, Woody? flavour, whether it originally was like it is now, I dont know, it is also 74% Proof.
21 YO from what I have tasted would definately be the closest tasting Appleton Rum.
If anyone is interested ther are 6 bottles of 17YO in existance (all with Bartenders here in the UK) and some in a cask in Jamaica.
I asked Joy whether it could be recreated and she said the blend was written down, but even if it was we would have to wait another 17 years to taste it.
I and a few others her on TC (Trader Woody,Tiki Chris..) had the pleasure of a MaiTai made with 17YO and must say it takes the drink to another level, I've never been that good at descriptions so maybe they would like to chime in on this.



 
View Profile of cheekytiki Send a personal message to cheekytiki  Email cheekytiki Goto the website of cheekytiki     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
thejab
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 2987
From: Tradewinds Apartments, Alameda, CA
Posted: 2006-07-19 11:01 am   Permalink

mbanu, I respectfully disagree with 2 things you said: 1. That "any dark full-bodied rum will do". Not really. A full-bodied Jamaican rum tastes much different then a full-bodied demarara then a full-bodied Martinique, etc. The key to selecting the best rums for a Mai Tai are body, smoothness, and age, but mostly how the end result tastes as close as possible to the original, and using say Pussers and Zya (though both excellent rums) would produce a much different drink then using Appleton and St. James. Tradition plays a big role.

I also disagree with your contention to use any Orange Curacao. Having tasted different brands side-by-side along with other orange liqueurs, there is much variation. See earlier discussion and previous threads on this.

However, all your other tips were spot on, regarding limes, syrups, technique, and presentation.


 
View Profile of thejab Send a personal message to thejab  Goto the website of thejab     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
KuKuAhu
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Dec 23, 2002
Posts: 567
From: Kahiki, Ohio
Posted: 2006-07-19 11:40 am   Permalink

Alright then... how do we all feel about the vanilla content of TV's sugar syrup?

Although the vanilla hinted bottled stuff is actually corn syrup, and obviously most here would prefer cane sugar... do you add vanilla to your sugar syrup for the mai tai?

I have tried it both ways, and personally, I like the vanilla addition. I try to keep one bottle of homemade vanilla tinged "mai tai syrup" on my bar.



Ahu

[ This Message was edited by: KuKuAhu 2006-07-19 11:41 ]


 
View Profile of KuKuAhu Send a personal message to KuKuAhu  Email KuKuAhu Goto the website of KuKuAhu     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Tikiwahine
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 09, 2003
Posts: 3293
From: Victoria, BC
Posted: 2006-07-20 9:50 pm   Permalink


Tonight's research.
I also have a bottle of Saint James that's 45% instead of 40%. They both came from Quebec, but the bottle with the higher alcohol content is all in French.
_________________

Great Minds Drink Alike


 View Profile of Tikiwahine Send a personal message to Tikiwahine      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Kona Chris
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 16, 2005
Posts: 241
From: Tucson, AZ
Posted: 2006-07-20 9:56 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2006-07-20 21:50, Tikiwahine wrote:

Tonight's research.
I also have a bottle of Saint James that's 45% instead of 40%. They both came from Quebec, but the bottle with the higher alcohol content is all in French.




What "Rock candy" syrup is that? I can't quite read the label. I was under the impression that TV's was the only one that had a simple syrup called "Rock Candy" but I see that I was wrong. Does it have vanilla too? What is it made from?

Looks like fun research! What was your conclusion?

Chris
_________________


 View Profile of Kona Chris Send a personal message to Kona Chris      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Tikiwahine
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 09, 2003
Posts: 3293
From: Victoria, BC
Posted: 2006-07-20 10:19 pm   Permalink

It's "Bar Blend" Rock Candy syrup, and "Quality" is their main ingredient

The ingredients list says: Water, sugar, citric acid, 1/10 of 1% benzoate of soda as a preservative. It's made in Oregon, and I bought it in Portland.

Conclusion: Thank you sir, may I have another?!

Best Mai Tai I've ever had.
_________________

Great Minds Drink Alike


 View Profile of Tikiwahine Send a personal message to Tikiwahine      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Rum Balls
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Oct 04, 2004
Posts: 900
From: Da Big Island
Posted: 2006-07-21 07:21 am   Permalink

"Bar Blend" also makes a good (and inexpensive) orgeat syrup and grenadine w/ real pomegranate. And I believe they're made without the dreaded High Fructose Corn Syrup (though I'm not staring at a label right now).
_________________


 View Profile of Rum Balls Send a personal message to Rum Balls      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Tikiwahine
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 09, 2003
Posts: 3293
From: Victoria, BC
Posted: 2006-07-21 8:42 pm   Permalink

Pulled out all the rums tonight, though I seem to be missing the matuzalem & cruzan estate.



 
View Profile of Tikiwahine Send a personal message to Tikiwahine      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Helz
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Oct 31, 2004
Posts: 416
From: Westminster, CO
Posted: 2006-07-22 06:10 am   Permalink

Well, being that most of the rums have been covered, I will stick to the one unique contribution that I can offer...

J. Bally Rhum Vieux, Agricole, Martinique

The bottle that I have is labeled as being distilled in 1979 and bottled in 1997. Which is interesting, because the only other bottle they had of this said it was distilled in 1990 and bottled in 1997.



This rum is an absoulutely beautiful carmel color, slighty darker and redder than Appleton's Estate. Being 90&#186, it has a bit of a harsh nose to it, but definitely has that sweet, spicy smell to it, and you can definitely pick up the oak distinctly.

This rum definitely has some kick to it, and a bit of heat on the finish, but the flavors are very deep and warm. And after the heat dissipates, the finish is very smoky with very little of the molasses/sweetness that you would expect.

Once this crash course is completed, my intention is to make one pristine Mai Tai with this and the Appleton's 21 year, along with the best ingredients that we find here.

Thanks Chip for one of the most entertaing and informitave threads I've read!


_________________


 View Profile of Helz Send a personal message to Helz  Email Helz Goto the website of Helz     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
cocktailcrazy
Member

Joined: Jan 14, 2004
Posts: 3
From: Saratoga, CA
Posted: 2006-07-22 06:20 am   Permalink

A question for Martiki: what brand of Italian Commerical Juicer do you use for your limes? I have an old Italian juicer that is hands down the BEST I've ever used, but it is getting old. I know commercial juicers are pricey, but seeing how the wife and I make a lot of drinks at home with citrus juice, I would certainly invest in another quality commerical juicer. What's the brand name, and where can I buy one? Any info is appreciated. Most bars I've been to use the Sunkist brand, but those break alot from what I'm told. THANKS!!



[ This Message was edited by: cocktailcrazy 2006-07-22 06:22 ]


 
View Profile of cocktailcrazy Send a personal message to cocktailcrazy      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Goto page ( Previous Page 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 Next Page )
U-Moderate:
  
v1.5

[ About Tiki Central | Contact Tiki Central | Advertise on Tiki Central ]
(c) 2000-2017 Tikiroom.com (tm), Tiki Central (tm)

Credits & copyright infomation