FEATURES | MUSIC | BOOKS | DRINKS | FORUMS | GAMES | LINKS | ABOUT


advertise on Tiki Central

Celebrating classic and modern Polynesian Pop
  [Edit Profile]  [Edit Preferences]  [Search] [Sign Up]
[Personal Messages]  [Member List]  [Help/FAQ]  [Rules]  [Login]
Tiki Central Forums Tiki Drinks and Food Bacardi Is to Bring Havana Club Rum Back to the U.S.
Goto page ( Previous Page 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 Next Page )
Bacardi Is to Bring Havana Club Rum Back to the U.S.
TikiSan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Sep 29, 2003
Posts: 253
From: O.C., SoCal
Posted: 2006-12-19 5:12 pm   Permalink

More articles:

Spirit of Christmas Past—and Future

Ian Williams | December 18, 2006

Editor: Emily Schwartz Greco, IPS

Foreign Policy In Focus
http://www.fpif.org/fpiftxt/3809

For centuries, rum has been a warming folk remedy for colds, flu—and indeed cold itself. As the winter solstice approaches in its various festival forms, one worldwide constant is the need for rum to bring a little tropical warmth into the winter. In places like the Caribbean, India, and Australia a solid rum-drinking tradition ensures that the amber nectar is savored year-around, but in colder climes, rum in eggnogs, Christmas cakes and puddings, mince pies and of course just rum in tots, are traditional accoutrements for the holiday season.

Rum is the world's biggest selling spirit—and both the European Union and the United States define it as any drink distilled from sugar cane products, so Brazilian cachaca is rum whether the Brazilians like it or not. (And they do tend to like it, whatever it's called.) While a certain formerly Cuban transnational corporation is, despite its bland tastelessness, the biggest brand, India's “Old Monk” and the Philippines' “Tanduay” are next up there. From Cuba's “Havana Club” to Barbadian “Mount Gay,” “Guyanese ElDorado,” and Jamaica's “Appleton,” rum offers a range of experiences for guzzlers to gourmets, from those best drunk in cocktails to those best savored sip by sip.
Not So Useless Byproduct

Most rums are made from the molasses left over when the white sugar is crystallized out, and one of its original attractions was that it used an otherwise useless byproduct instead of competing for scarce food grains—as whiskey did for example. The American colonies banned whiskey distillation because it drove up the price of grain and hence bread. And when that happened, old Anglo Saxon tradition was that you rioted and knocked the Town Hall down until the authorities did something about it.

On current evidence, Barbados is the place where nascent Northern technology and tropical agriculture combined to bring about the distillation of spirits of unsurpassed strength and in unsurpassed quantities. The Caribbean was a great melting pot for cultures and for a brief period in the seventeenth century, Barbados was at their focus.

The Portuguese in Brazil had brought sugar-growing from the Arabs in the Mediterranean. The Dutch and the Portuguese Jewish refugees had brought milling and trading skills. And one can only suspect that among the prisoners and indentured servants sent from Britain were some Irish or Scottish exiles who were familiar with the new technology of the still.
Hot Hellish Liquor

People knew that the molasses left behind by sugar refining fermented easily, but only the bold risked drinking it. It continues fermenting in the stomach, according to some who've tried. However, put it through a still and you had a potent and palatable drink. They called it Kill-Devil, or rumbullion, “a hot, hellish liquor,”—and they loved it.

Rum was born.

Soon, they discovered that storing it in oak barrels did wonders for the palatability. Killdevil became rum or “Barbadoes Water” and was in demand across the Atlantic World, until in Jamaica, they discovered that if you redistilled the liquor, it was still hot, but a little less hellish.

It soon spread. New Englanders made rum from contraband molasses that they smuggled from the French colonies, where Paris forbad distillation, in case it competed with Cognac. The enterprising Yankees drank a lot of it, and as Benjamin Franklin boasted, used what was left to help ethnically cleanse the Indian tribes to the West and to trade for slaves in West Africa.

They did so initially under the protection of the British Royal Navy, which won its wars with the French through the period not least because the British national debt was underwritten with the profits of the Caribbean sugar and rum trade. The British Navy was also fuelled more directly by rum. For hundreds of years, every British sailor had a daily ration of a pint of overproof rum.
Revolution Over Taxation

After defeating the French, the Royal Navy turned to defeating American smugglers who had been busily trading with the enemy, and the American Revolution began. The British felt that the American colonists should make a financial contribution to the biggest national debt hitherto that they had run up clearing the French threat from Canada. American colonists were as averse to taxation as some of their descendents. The revolution was about taxation, not representation—and it was not about tea but molasses and rum. In fact, the core problem was American resentment of military policing of civilians. This was two centuries before the White House reintroduced the concept after 9-11 of course.

Throughout the 18th century, the Caribbean was the equivalent of the modern Persian Gulf. The great powers went there to fight their wars over the liquid energy and liquid capital of the islands. France, Britain, and others sacrificed untold hundreds of thousands of white indentured laborers, African slaves, soldiers, and sailors on the altar of sugar and rum.

Not that it did him much good, but Napoleon devalued Britain's Caribbean empire while losing most of the important battles. In 1811, Benjamin Delessert had a pilot plant working with Spanish POWs who were experienced in sugar refining, when the emperor turned up, with a troop of horse guards, pinned a Legion D'Honneur on his chest, and ordered the wholesale expansion of sugar beet production.

Within a few decades, beet sugar and the anti-slavery movement had converted the Caribbean from being the engine of North Atlantic economic and military power to a backwater of empire and they have never really recovered.
Bacardi and Revolutionaries

The English-speaking islands had lost American markets to the new whiskey distilleries that Western grain made possible, and the French and Spanish colonies were finally allowed to make rum themselves. Even so, Jamaica rum was the standard until the 20th century and it was Jamaican distillers who moved to Cuba who probably founded the original Bacardi distillery.

Bacardi won prizes from the Spanish Court for its rum, credited with bringing young King Alfonso of Spain back from death's door with a tot of the family specialty in 1892. Bacardi was revolutionary in many ways.

Even as it saved the royal life, the family supported the Cuban revolutionaries against Spain, and later supported Fidel Castro and the guerrillas against Batista. The Bacardi clan even provided members of Castro's first trade delegation to the United States. And then he nationalized them and they took it personally—very personally. They have been fighting on every level ever since, especially politically in the United States.

Bacardi boss Juan Pépin Bosch brought a touch of the old connection between buccaneering and rum back to life in 1961 by buying a surplus U.S. Air Force B-26 Marauder medium bomber, to bomb a Cuban oil refinery. Later he was the money behind a plot to assassinate Castro.

In fact, the Castro takeover had not fatally wounded the company, which had already become one of the first trans-nationals. From 1955, Bacardi was headquartered in the Bahamas, getting British Empire tariff preferences, and from the 1930s its major distillery was in Puerto Rico to get access to the American market that it had cornered during Prohibition, when it was the rumrunner's favorite product.
Evil Empire

Bacardi has been the evil empire to the other smaller Caribbean rum producers. It works to keep them out of markets as fervently if they were all Castroite allies. On some islands you cannot get the local rum in the hotel bars, because Bacardi has bought the concession.

The Caribbean islands that once fuelled world wars and industrial revolutions are now almost entirely dependent on tourism for their economic survival. First President Bill Clinton took them to the World Trade Organization to remove preferential access to Europe for their bananas. The Drug Enforcement Agency takes strong measures against another traditional island recreational crop, and in the face of protected EU and U.S. sugar substitutes, their sugar cane fields are being leveled to make golf courses for gringos.

But tourism and rum could go together. The region's Rum producers should be selling more than a drink—they should be selling a concept, a life style. As Johnny Depp exulted, staggering round his desert island in the film Pirates of the Caribbean, “Rum, sand, and sun! It's the Caribbean!”

And almost every shot you down will help development. Sugar cane only grows in the tropical zone, which as it happens, is mostly underdeveloped in the modern world. Selling high value-added branded spirits on the world market makes much more sense than trying to compete with cane sugar in a market where the EU protects sugar beet farmers and the United States looks after the double interests of Cuban exile sugar plantation owners in Florida, and Archer Daniels Midlands' high fructose corn syrup, made from maize.
Pathetic Substitutes

These pathetic substitutes need high tariff protection and subsidies because there is nothing as efficient as cane for producing sugar and energy—and hence rum. As a result, as Fidel Castro discovered, mass marketing high-value added Havana Club rum across the world produces far more revenue than bags of sugar in the supermarkets.

Somehow, the Caricom island rum producers have to overcome their insularity. Just as the island governments have been selling the Caribbean as a concept, they should be boosting Caribbean rum as the distilled essence of the islands, whose every sip in the cold of winter evokes happy memories of sultry tropics, and an altogether better and more relaxed life style. They should be keeping their sugar plantations because, not only can they produce gasohol like Brazil, they can produce rum and attract tourists to watch it being cooked up.
Trade Spats

Caribbean Rum distillers have millions of potential customers coming into their territories who can take their acquired tastes back with them to the bars of London and New York. They have expatriates in their millions who can guarantee exporters a market. So far, whatever dents there have been on the Bacardi empire have come from major international spirits acquiring distribution rights for island products. The biggest success story is Pernod Ricard's partnership with Havana Club. That old Bacardi magic in Washington ensures that they cannot sell it in the United States and indeed the dispute over the trademark has almost provoked trade wars between the EU and United States.

However, it takes more than variations on “Old” and “Aged,” on the bottles to build a brand. Discerning and affluent consumers want to see precise ages and they want a back-story for their bottle. And what a back-story rum has. It can beat any other drink with four centuries of Caribbean history to call on. Rum launched revolutions, slave rebellions, and fuelled wars on land and on sea. Its devotees include pirates, sailors, soldiers and admirals, planters and field hands, rum shops and chic bars.

Every rum bottle on every cold northern bar shelf should be a spirited ambassador for Caribbean tourism. Vodka, whose sales are booming world wide with heavy advertising, is just a dull spirit, literally ethanol and water. But rum, in its infinite flavorsome variety, is the true global spirit with its warm beating heart in the Caribbean.

Ian Williams is a Foreign Policy In Focus contributor (www.fpif.org) and the author of Rum: A Social and Sociable History of the Real Spirit of 1776 (Nation Books, hardback 2005, and paperback 2006). This article is specially written for FPIF in aid of development and merrymaking.


 View Profile of TikiSan Send a personal message to TikiSan      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
TikiSan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Sep 29, 2003
Posts: 253
From: O.C., SoCal
Posted: 2006-12-19 5:15 pm   Permalink

Another article:

http://marketplace.publicradio.org/shows/2006/11/30/PM200611305.html
Thursday, November 30, 2006
Bacardi's Havana Club Rum

Blame it on Mojitos

U.S. rum sales are on fire this year, and that's raised the stakes in the trademark dispute over a storied rum from Cuba. Janet Babin reports.

KAI RYSSDAL: We're not quite in the right season for 'em anymore, but Mojitos have set rum sales in the U.S. on fire. It's second only to vodka in popularity. Which raises the stakes in a dispute between two companies over the trademark of a legendary Cuban rum. From the Marketplace Innovations Desk at North Carolina Public Radio, Janet Babin reports:


JANET BABIN: To understand the Cuban trademark war between two rum makers, it helps to have experience with the stuff. Preferably, the good stuff.

NICK ROBINS: OK, let's see what we got here. . . . All right."

Duke visiting scholar Nick Robins got this aged Cuban sipping rum in Cuba, during one of his many visits. It's caramel colored with an inviting taste, even for someone not used to hard liquor in the afternoon.

ROBINS: "That's smooth, huh? And as they say, there's more where that came from.

But not much more, if you're an American. The U.S. imposed an embargo against Cuban goods decades ago, and Florida recently announced plans to strengthen enforcement against offenders. And Robins says that's part of Cuban rum's popularity — its forbidden taste is steeped in the island's culture:

ROBINS: The way we are into our beer or our football, the Cubans are into their rum and their baseball. It is part of the identity.

Just who owns the real identity of Havana Club Rum in the U.S. market is what's behind the battle between France-based Pernod-Ricard, its Cuban partner Cubaexport and Bacardi USA. Pernod has made Havana Club Rum in Cuba for more than a decade, and sells it throughout the world.

Bacardi USA began selling its own version of Havana Club Rum in Florida in August, after the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office refused to renew Pernod's Havana Club trademark. Bacardi spokesman John Gomez says Bacardi bought the real Havana Club recipe and should get the trademark:

JOHN GOMEZ: Bacardi does own the rights to Havana Club. Bacardi purchased the rights in the mid-90s from the Arechabalas family.

That family made the rum in Cuba from the 1930s to the 1960s, when it fled Fidel Castro's regime. Intellectual property attorney Robert Muse has worked with Pernod in the past. He says the Patent Office decision about Havana Club's trademark was based on a congressional provision passed in 1998. It prevents the U.S. from honoring trademarks of businesses confiscated by the Cuban government.

Muse calls it the Bacardi law:

ROBERT MUSE: It has no support. It's an egregious example of special-interest legislation by a non-U.S. company to procure an anticompetitive benefit in a rum competition.

Muse says the Patent Office decision could threaten the trademark stability of hundreds of U.S. products sold overseas. Despite the embargo, some 300 U.S. brands have the right to sell products in Cuba, from Tyson Chicken to Wrigley's gum. Muse says this could weaken brand enforcement for those companies.

MUSE: Cuba under international law is now free to invalidate, cease registering, or take any other actions against U.S. trademarks.

Bacardi doesn't have and doesn't need a trademark to sell Havana Club in the U.S. But it could run into another kind of legal trouble. While Pernod's rum is made in Cuba. Gomez says Bacardi's . . .

GOMEZ: . . . It's, uh, made in Puerto Rico.

But it's called Havana Club. That could lead consumers to believe they're buying Cuban rum. Cardozo law professor Justin Hughes says it's illegal to market a product that's geographically misleading:

JUSTIN HUGHES: Havana Club on a product that is rum not from Cuba, rum from the Dominican Republic, or rum from Jamaica might be deceptive.

But Bacardi spokesman Gomez says consumers are smarter than that:

GOMEZ: We really give our consumers a lot of credit for being able to read the label and see that it's very obvious that it comes from Puerto Rico.

Pernod has filed a federal lawsuit against Bacardi for allegedly misleading consumers about where its rum is made.

According to the Distilled Spirits Council, rum brought in almost $1.8 billion in 2005, up 5.5 percent over the year before. Bacardi continues to sell Havana Club in Florida, and is considering selling it in other states too.

In Durham, North Carolina, I'm Janet Babin for Marketplace.


 View Profile of TikiSan Send a personal message to TikiSan      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
arriano
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 13, 2006
Posts: 1286
From: Dog Patch - San Diego
Posted: 2006-12-20 2:36 pm   Permalink

The whole thing is pretty silly, if you ask me. People don't want Havana Club because of the brand name. They want it because it's Cuban rum. The Bacardi labeled Havana Club might offer some nostalgia for Cuban-Americans, but after that I don't see what benefit it is to anyone. It's Puerto Rican rum so why not just purchase Bacardi or some other Puerto Rican rum?

[ This Message was edited by: arriano 2006-12-20 22:08 ]


 
View Profile of arriano Send a personal message to arriano      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
hala bullhiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Nov 26, 2002
Posts: 570
From: champaign,illinois
Posted: 2006-12-23 10:31 am   Permalink

truly sad. the real havana club is so good, and to think bacardi will just sell an inferior product with that name is blasphemy

 
View Profile of hala bullhiki Send a personal message to hala bullhiki  Email hala bullhiki     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Erizo
Member

Joined: Apr 01, 2007
Posts: 2
From: Naples, FL
Posted: 2007-04-01 8:52 pm   Permalink

Hi there everyone. i`m new in this forum but aged in the art of drinking rum from about 40 years of tasting cuban rum, born and raised in Havana could not be otherwise, like i see here there is a war going on between Bacardi and Havana Club,
Well, as long the drinker haven`t proof Havana Club never before, no problem, Bacardi will do, or any other in this case, but once you have tried out Havana Club and specially the seven years old there is no way back, is like a very powerful hard drug, there is no substitute for it anyplace in the world, i must confessed that are some others rum from the Caribbean that when not Havana Club is present will get you close to this ideally state of spirit that many of you will already know, i`m talking about the panamenian "El Abuelo " and specially the 12 years aejo, " Pampero " from venezuela, "Flor de Caa " 12 aos from Nicaragua, and few others, but afterward you still missing the Real Thing .
I can`t explain why is that, it maybe the sugar cane from Cuba, it maybe the water they use or like a friend of my use to say, the acetic acid they use to simile the age years ( that last is a joke although any rum with a 1 ml of this acid will taste " aged " ).
I been living for seven years here in the states, missing the "real thing" a lot and expecting that some day Cuba will be free again to prove the taste i grew older with, in the meantime i was able to bring few of them bottles in last January from Europe and still looking for any shop willing to sell me few more from any part of the world, glad hear from any of you any news about it.
What a shame that politics and other circumstances make us missing the pleasure of enjoying one of the little things that a normal human should enjoy at least once a week, a couple shots of good rum and the taste of a cuban cigar.
BTW, sorry for my english, i`m still learning.


 
View Profile of Erizo Send a personal message to Erizo      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Erizo
Member

Joined: Apr 01, 2007
Posts: 2
From: Naples, FL
Posted: 2007-04-01 8:52 pm   Permalink

Hi there everyone. i`m new in this forum but aged in the art of drinking rum from about 40 years of tasting cuban rum, born and raised in Havana could not be otherwise, like i see here there is a war going on between Bacardi and Havana Club,
Well, as long the drinker haven`t proof Havana Club never before, no problem, Bacardi will do, or any other in this case, but once you have tried out Havana Club and specially the seven years old there is no way back, is like a very powerful hard drug, there is no substitute for it anyplace in the world, i must confessed that are some others rum from the Caribbean that when not Havana Club is present will get you close to this ideally state of spirit that many of you will already know, i`m talking about the panamenian "El Abuelo " and specially the 12 years aejo, " Pampero " from venezuela, "Flor de Caa " 12 aos from Nicaragua, and few others, but afterward you still missing the Real Thing .
I can`t explain why is that, it maybe the sugar cane from Cuba, it maybe the water they use or like a friend of my use to say, the acetic acid they use to simile the age years ( that last is a joke although any rum with a 1 ml of this acid will taste " aged " ).
I been living for seven years here in the states, missing the "real thing" a lot and expecting that some day Cuba will be free again to prove the taste i grew older with, in the meantime i was able to bring few of them bottles in last January from Europe and still looking for any shop willing to sell me few more from any part of the world, glad hear from any of you any news about it.
What a shame that politics and other circumstances make us missing the pleasure of enjoying one of the little things that a normal human should enjoy at least once a week, a couple shots of good rum and the taste of a cuban cigar.
BTW, sorry for my english, i`m still learning.


 
View Profile of Erizo Send a personal message to Erizo      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
TraderPeg
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Aug 10, 2006
Posts: 91
From: Haunted Hudson Valley
Posted: 2007-04-03 9:06 pm   Permalink

Welcome, Erizo, and thank you for your unique perspective on Havana Club rum! Many of us here can only wonder what it tastes like, but with your experience you can direct us to other rums that come close to it, as you have already done with your recommendations. Please continue to share these -- I have already written them into my notebook for shopping.

 
View Profile of TraderPeg Send a personal message to TraderPeg      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
VampiressRN
Grand Member (7 years)  

Joined: Nov 23, 2006
Posts: 5708
From: Sun City Lincoln Hills (NorCal)
Posted: 2007-04-03 9:39 pm   Permalink

Welcome to TC Erizo and thanks for posting your thoughts about the quality of rum. I was researching recipies and the history of the Mojito this weekend and of course there was a reference to the Havana Club Rum. Sounds like there are many things that affect taste & quality including water, the properties of the sugar growth, and of course age.

Here is some of the latest on your passion.
Interview link here.


Bacardi will relaunch its Havana Club brand in the States for first time since the US embargoed Cuba. Host Kai Ryssdal talks to Miami Herald reporter Elaine Walker about the trademark ruling that allowed it and what it could mean for other companies.

TEXT OF INTERVIEW

KAI RYSSDAL: Ahhh summertime. Perfect season for one of those fancy rum drinks. A daquiri maybe. Or a mojito. Starting this week, Americans will be able to mix those drinks with a brand of Cuban rum that's been off the shelves since 1960. It's called Havana Club, and Barcadi is the company bringing it to the United States. But Havana Club's not made in Cuba. In fact, Havana makes its own version of Havana Club. Elaine Walker's a reporter for the Miami Herald.

ELAINE WALKER: It started in the '30s. These were the days when Havana was a glorious hot night spot and this was the chic drink that was consumed by all the fashionable and elite people.

RYSSDAL: And how did it come to pass now that Bacardi's going to wind up selling it in the States?

WALKER: Well Bacardi did a deal with the Arechabala family. They were the original owners of the brand. They lost everything in Cuba, so they made this deal with Bacardi in the mid-'90s and gave Bacardi their recipe and they claim the rights to produce the rum in the United States.

RYSSDAL: But you've been able to get Havana Club outside the United States for 35 or 40 years.

WALKER: Correct. I mean Havana Club is sold widely in Europe and obviously in Cuba and other countries. Now, the Havana Club that is sold there is a totally different Havana Club than the Havana Club that Bacardi is now putting out. Bacardi has the Arechabala family recipe and Ramon Arechabala says that the Havana Club that is produced by the Cuban government and Pernod Ricard is awful as far as he's concerned and not drinkable. These are two entirely different products just being marketed under the same name.

RYSSDAL: Taking sort of a longer view. This is a problem quite a few companies who want to do business with Cuba going forward might wind up having, don't you think?

WALKER: Well clearly, there's trademark issues on both sides relative to Cuba. The Cuban government has tried to trademark things in the United States so that after the embargo is over they can do business in the United States, which is clearly what was the case here with this trademark. Now also at the same time, US companies want to do business in Cuba as well after the embargo is lifted and supposedly many US companies have filed at least some preliminary registration in Cuba to protect their trademarks so that they can do business down there.

RYSSDAL: And all of this is happening despite the nominal US embargo?

WALKER: Correct, I mean this is basically positioning so that they can do business when the embargo is lifted.

RYSSDAL: Elaine Walker is with the Miami Herald. Ms. Walker thanks for your time.

WALKER: Thank you.

RYSSDAL: Still nothing new on Fidel, by the way. Resting comfortably, we're told.

_________________
"Oh waiter, another cocktail please!!!"


 View Profile of VampiressRN Send a personal message to VampiressRN  Email VampiressRN Goto the website of VampiressRN     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Haole'akamai
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 07, 2005
Posts: 2272
From: The Polynesian Port of NOLA
Posted: 2010-03-18 09:14 am   Permalink

Watching Dexter, season 3 (from 2007, I believe), on DVD last night and caught this:



Obviously, it was a prop, but can anyone tell if it's a real HV label or the fake Bacardi HV one?


_________________
"If you can't be a good example -- then you'll just have to be a horrible warning."
-Catherine Aird


 
View Profile of Haole'akamai Send a personal message to Haole'akamai      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
JackLord
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 18, 2006
Posts: 160
From: Washington, DC
Posted: 2010-06-04 11:12 am   Permalink

Interesting thread...

I have sipped Havana Club in Cuba, Canada, and Europe. Its no better or worse than Bicardi or any other decent rum out there. I suspect nostalgia or the "forbidden fruit" aspect of it amplifies its reputation.

I am fond of the label and keep a bottle around which I wash out and refill with Bacardi.

Again, its a fine drink and if you see a bottle, go for it. Nonetheless I honestly feel its reputation exceeds reality.


 
View Profile of JackLord Send a personal message to JackLord      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Trader Rick
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Jul 04, 2003
Posts: 88
From: St Augustine Beach, FL
Posted: 2010-06-04 11:55 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2010-03-18 09:14, Haole'akamai wrote:
Watching Dexter, season 3 (from 2007, I believe), on DVD last night and caught this:



Obviously, it was a prop, but can anyone tell if it's a real HV label or the fake Bacardi HV one?






Fake Bacardi. The real stuff has a white label and comes in liter bottles. I had a sea captain friend (no, really!) bring me a couple of bottles from Europe a few years back. I tried to nurse them and make them last, but the drinks they made were sooooo good they were both gone in a month. I don't recall I shared them with anyone either. I was a selfish pig, but there it is.
_________________

All Hail Floyd!! (Mira Mar League of Extraordinary Gentlemen)


 
View Profile of Trader Rick Send a personal message to Trader Rick  Email Trader Rick     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Sweet Daddy Tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 20, 2003
Posts: 1070
From: Edmonton
Posted: 2010-06-04 1:51 pm   Permalink

Looks to me like real HC 7 year in a 750 ml bottle. Only the blanco has a white label.

_________________
-Sweet Daddy T.
Because crap doesn't buy itself.

blog

[ This Message was edited by: Sweet Daddy Tiki 2010-06-04 13:56 ]


 View Profile of Sweet Daddy Tiki Send a personal message to Sweet Daddy Tiki  Goto the website of Sweet Daddy Tiki     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11131
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2010-06-04 11:52 pm   Permalink

I don't drink white rum, so I couldn't say if white Bacardi and white Havana Club taste alike (don't all white rums taste alike?)... but the dark 7 Year old Havana Club is unquestionably in a class of its own.

 
View Profile of bigbrotiki Send a personal message to bigbrotiki  Goto the website of bigbrotiki     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Sparkle Mark
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 05, 2004
Posts: 301
From: Porter Ranch, CA
Posted: 2010-06-05 02:23 am   Permalink

Havana Club Anejo Blanco is actually pretty damn tasty all by itself.
I was expecting the same flavor as Bacardi "Superior" (rubbing alcohol with cotton candy and banana skittles)
Havana Club Anejo Blanco is soft and warm and full of unexpected complexity.
Come over and have some right next to the HC 7 year. I dare you.

Best
Mark


 
View Profile of Sparkle Mark Send a personal message to Sparkle Mark  Goto the website of Sparkle Mark     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
JackLord
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 18, 2006
Posts: 160
From: Washington, DC
Posted: 2010-06-06 08:33 am   Permalink

I have always been partial to Appleton myself. Nonetheless, HC will get you there.

 
View Profile of JackLord Send a personal message to JackLord      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Goto page ( Previous Page 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 Next Page )
U-Moderate:
  
v1.5

[ About Tiki Central | Contact Tiki Central | Advertise on Tiki Central ]
(c) 2000-2014 Tikiroom.com (tm), Tiki Central (tm)

Credits & copyright infomation