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Tiki-On-A-Budget
Tikisgrl
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 03, 2005
Posts: 863
From: Lowell, Mass
Posted: 2006-08-17 5:56 pm   Permalink

Went to Ikea today & bought one of these, marked down to 2.99 plus tax:



Kinda neat they had lemon yellow & lime green for wall or table... It has to be plugged in but it has a nice glow.

Tikisgrl



 
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dogbytes
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Mar 24, 2002
Posts: 2241
From: seattle, wa
Posted: 2006-08-18 3:46 pm   Permalink

one of my first projects was Tapa Lamp step by step instructions were easy to follow! unfortunately shutterfly has eaten Al-ii's photos.



also made one with cool rongorongo patteren handmade (but not by me) mulberry paper



(photos stolen from Sabina's website from when she visited us last year)


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dogbytes
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Mar 24, 2002
Posts: 2241
From: seattle, wa
Posted: 2006-08-19 12:28 am   Permalink

Don't throw away any scraps of tapa from your lamp project! a bit of Mod Podge and you can tikify many things:

electrical switchplate covers:


lava lampsuffering bastard lamp

also, used fleckstone spray paint to cover a TJMaxx Suffering Bastard Bottle, and stuck a battery-operated candlestick (from dollar tree) and an old lampshade to make a nifty lamp!


 
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dogbytes
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Mar 24, 2002
Posts: 2241
From: seattle, wa
Posted: 2006-08-19 01:14 am   Permalink

i really like this Thrifty Thread ~ i looked around the Rongorongo Room and realized, i have some ideas to offer!

wrap kiddie hula skirts from Oriental Trading Co (5 bucks each) around plain barstools for an instant tropical look!

i've been meaning to mod podge tapa rounds on the seats.. but this'll do for now!

Tapa patterned Corobuff (48" wide) is only 95 cents/foot! and its easy cut (there are guide lines on the back!) and easy to staple to the walls/stairwells.


Transform windows into faux fishtanks ~ Frame with split bamboo. installed cheap fluorescent lights from Ikea ~ plastic fish hung from fishing line. Marine Aquarium Backgrounds are 2.50/foot. also a great place for those single S&Ps or broken mugs

before:

after:


 
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velveteenlounge
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Feb 13, 2004
Posts: 324
From: Velveteen Lounge, NY
Posted: 2006-08-19 07:11 am   Permalink

I LOVE this thread! Not only are we on a budget, but tiki sightings in our area are few and far between. Good thing we like being crafty! Here are a few of my favorite cheap projects we've done. Our tiki room is our enclosed porch.

These shelves are in front of the windows leading to our living room:




For this one I glued some vintage bamboo fabric from my mother-in-law directly onto our fridge with Elmers. Two years later it's holding up great!



We rescued this planter from my mother-in-law's garage. We got the bamboo to make the palm trees on sale at Pier 1 and the "palms" at Jo-Ann Fabrics (on sale, natch!). The "fire pit" next to it was inspired by the fire pit in the book "Pad." I used lava rocks and the moai is from Archie McPhee:



Our version of the glass-topped table:



Have I mentioned how much I love this thread? Granite Tiki, we had those same outdoor lights you have and the strand was destroyed by some cats who chose our garden in which to have a fight. I managed to rescue three of them. I'm going to steal your idea to spray them with Fleck Stone today! Thanks!


 
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velveteenlounge
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Feb 13, 2004
Posts: 324
From: Velveteen Lounge, NY
Posted: 2006-08-19 11:21 am   Permalink

By the way, I love what you did with that lava lamp, Dogbytes. I have a place in need of a little ambient light in my bar and I'd been thinking a lava lamp would be perfect and fabric is a great way to get rid of the silver base.


 
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The Granite Tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 02, 2005
Posts: 809
From: Nashua, NH
Posted: 2006-08-19 4:10 pm   Permalink

I've got a silver base to a Volcano Lamp from Walgreen that is crying out for that treatment!

dogbytes, I believe I saw that faux fish tank when you first posted it in another thread, but I obviously didn't read it, because I thought it was real!!! I thought, "oo, it'd be nice to have a fish tank, but I could never afford something like that!!!" Great work!

[ This Message was edited by: The Granite Tiki 2006-08-19 16:13 ]


 
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Eleio the fleet
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 11, 2006
Posts: 170
From: The mountain jungles of Denver CO
Posted: 2006-08-19 5:12 pm   Permalink

The entrance to my basement seems very similar to yours Dogbytes. I like the stairway treatment and the fishtank idea, in particular.

 
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Eleio the fleet
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 11, 2006
Posts: 170
From: The mountain jungles of Denver CO
Posted: 2006-08-22 12:26 am   Permalink

OK Folks,

I've been very intrigued by this subject and compliment everyone who has contributed. In my effort to further help enhance this thread, I've put together the following "how-to" article. The project described is intended for personal use only. Your feedback is more than welcome.

------

So you've spent all your cash on creating some decent tiki decor, but (gasp) you realize that you have no exotic art.

Iíve been there, so here is how I made some decent framed tiki art for very little $.

Project: Cheap Bamboo Framed Tiki Art

The breakdown: Supplies/Cost/Suggestion on where to find

SUPPLIES

-A decent cutting tool or saw/$15-25/local hardware store-Target, etc. Since I have very limited space and need a little flexibility in my cutting, I use a hand held jigsaw to answer most of my basic cutting needs.
Cost per project: Hard to say since a good saw can do several various projects and should be purchased for more than just this one. Iíll assign a cost of $.50 per frame (this includes blade wear).

-Low melt glue gun/$5-$7(glue sticks generally run an additional $1-$2 for a pack of 2 doz.)/local craft store. Cost per project: For the same reasons as the saw, Iíll assign a cost of $.25 per frame.

-Picture Wire/$5 (one spool can be used for dozens of these small frames)/local hardware store. I prefer picture wire over cord or twine for hanging items, because I feel it can be more forgiving.
Cost per project: The wire can be used for several frames, but isnít as universal as the saw and the glue gun. Iíll assign a cost of $.50 per frame

-Sticky Back EVA Sheet/$1 for a 9Ē x 12Ē sheet/Hobby Lobby. Iíve found that this foam works very well as a cheap method of backing photos. For ametures, glue spray can damage the art or adhere unevenly, which can create very noticeable air bubbles.
Cost per project: $1

-8í length of ĹĒ bamboo pole/$2-$3/Cost Plus or another import store. Depending on the dimension of the art you intend to use, one pole can be used to make 2-3 frames
Cost per project: $1

-Tiki Art/I purchased Shagís Tiki Drinks at Half.com for $5/Besides the art on the drink cards, some art can be accessed on the web or you could even use tiki magazine and album covers.
Cost per project: $.10

-A good scanner-printer or access to cheap color copies/copy stores generally make color copies for $1 each.
Cost per project: $1

-A razor blade-box cutter-penknife/$1/Hobby Store. Used to trim the photo, backing or mounting foam and excess glue.
Cost per project: $.10

Estimated cost per project: $4.45

CONSTRUCTION

Now that you have your supplies, hereís what to do:

First, understand that the size of your framed art is largely dependent on the dimensions of the size of print you can produce. For Cheap Tiki purposes, Iím assuming that you donít have the $ to buy a full sized print. My printer will create 8 ĹĒ x 14Ē images, so thatís my limit, minus about ľĒ inch around the perimeter (explained later). Not the best for a single, stand alone piece, but because of this limitation, Iíve had very positive results with creative groupings of 2-3 framed pieces.

1.Get your art. Web images tend to pixilate if you blow them up large enough to print, so I generally use art that I can scan and print.

2.Mount the art to the backing foam. Apply the photo slowly onto the sticky back foam and use your hand or something flat to ensure the whole image is adhered to the foam. Air bubbles are not your friend! After the picture has been mounted to the foam, use a razor blade or penknife to cut off all but ľĒ-ĹĒ of the excess foam.

3.Cut your bamboo. I chose to make my frames out of fully round bamboo, but you can certainly split it if you want. I just wanted a more primitive look. Also, for that primitive look again, I didnít cut my frame pieces at angles. If you plan to do similar, make sure to factor in the width of the bamboo when deciding the length of the frame pieces. Anyway, I simply marked my cutting points, secured the pole with a ďCĒ clamp (not too tight or the pole with split) and used my jigsaw. One thing to mention is that I held the piece being cut off and pulled it a little towards me (not enough to pinch the blade) just before the blade completed the cut. The cut was always cleaner as a result.

*Image on card-scanned print-print on trimmed sticky foam w/partial frame placement

4.Lay the frame out. Place your foam mounted picture on a flat surface and place your frame pieces out accordingly. Try not to get the exposed sticky back too dirty, youíll need that adhesion later. Make sure to lay the bamboo out so that it hides any of the backing foam. Mark and trim the bamboo, as needed.

5.Glue the frame together. Donít skimp and donít let the glue cool too much before attaching the frame pieces. If you donít achieve a good bond at this point, the weight of the frame will slowly pull itself apart and youíll have to re-glue a part or all of the frame again. After cooling, carefully trim off any visible glue, with a razor blade (your fingernail is sometimes best for this).

6.Frame your art. Lay the frame down over the art, so that none of the backing is visible, and gently press it down so that it adheres to the sticky mount. Turn the framed art over and press the foam directly to the frame and trim off any backing that can be seen from the front. I would also suggest running a very thin bead of hot glue along the outer edge of the backing. The mount looses some of itís stickiness over time and sometimes separates from the frame. The glue seemed to address that problem.

7.Youíre almost there. Now you need some method of hanging your art. While the frame is still flat and with the back facing up, take a small length of the picture hanging wire, making curls on each end, and glue the curls to the foam mount (curled wire doesnít slip out of the cooled glue). When positioning the wire, keep in mind that you want a certain amount of bend in the middle for the nail. Iíve found that hot glue bonds very well with this type of foam and recommend this method for these art pieces, so long as the overall size of the frame doesnít exceed 8 ĹĒ x 14Ē.


Youíre done! Now hang your new tiki art and enjoy!



-I made several of these framed pieces for my home, over a year ago, and though I've had to re-glue a few corners, most of my frames have held together very well and the art still looks good.

[ This Message was edited by: Eleio the fleet 2006-08-22 00:40 ]



[ This Message was edited by: Eleio the fleet 2006-08-22 08:39 ]


 
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The Granite Tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 02, 2005
Posts: 809
From: Nashua, NH
Posted: 2006-08-22 10:33 am   Permalink

Great post Eleio the fleet!

I've attempted to make my own frames from bamboo before, and failed miserably!

I can't wait to follow your plan!


 
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twitch
Grand Member (7 years)  

Joined: May 12, 2006
Posts: 425
From: Vacant lot where T. Vic's, Van. was
Posted: 2006-08-22 7:39 pm   Permalink

Woo! Good how-to post. Often thought of ripping apart my 'Bottomless Cocktail' book to do this, but didn't imagine it looking too good (plus the ripping-apart-of-the-Shag-book thing isn't too appealing; but it's a toss-up between that or blowing 3/4 of an ink-tank printing a scan!). Now I'll have to give it a go.
If I may throw in an option; get a hold of some leopard-print fabric or paper for a backing for the picture, leaving a few inches between the pic and the frame for the animal-print to show up.
For the fabric, if you can't find any at yer local fabric/sewing supplier (more $$ there anyway) hit any thrift and rummage thru the women's dresses/blouses and hack out a nice patch off the back when you get home. I did this with a record-less Martin Denny LP and it looks great. (For the budget-conscious, the Denny albums are a bit harder to find!)
_________________
A Collection of Exotic Albums! & The Sandy Warner Files

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Eleio the fleet
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 11, 2006
Posts: 170
From: The mountain jungles of Denver CO
Posted: 2006-08-22 7:59 pm   Permalink

Thanks for the kind words Granite and Twitch! I'm really enjoying this subject.

Regarding your comment about the animal print Twitch. I didn't think of it until you made mention, but I do think there a leopard skin design for this foam. Not sure how I'd apply it yet, but I'm sure it would work.

Excellent suggestion!


 
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Queen Kamehameha
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Oct 21, 2003
Posts: 1410
From: So Cal
Posted: 2006-08-22 8:19 pm   Permalink

This is a terrific thread with very creative ideas. You all have done some very very cool things.
I think all people love creative designs regardless of how much $$ you have available. It makes the Tiki in your house that much more special.

Me, I like to do mosaics, but they can be expensive if you buy all those little tiles from the craft store, so I go to home depot and buy or get their chipped or broken tiles. They usually have a bin of them in the back, and sometimes they just let you have them. You might have to fill in with some of those 4cent bathroom tiles, but overall this is a very cost effective method. The tile cement is the largest investment

I did this whole mosaic(20 feet wall) with broken or chipped tile from HD. Cost about 75.00 complete. Drew the picture from two pictures I found online, using a sharpie, then broke up the tile and glued to the wall. Then you grout. I have done table tops for under 5.00.






[ This Message was edited by: Queen Kamehameha 2006-08-22 20:27 ]


 
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dogbytes
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Mar 24, 2002
Posts: 2241
From: seattle, wa
Posted: 2006-08-22 8:25 pm   Permalink

whoa Queen K ~ thats one big mosaic! beautiful..how many hours did it take to fill in and grout?

 
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Queen Kamehameha
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Oct 21, 2003
Posts: 1410
From: So Cal
Posted: 2006-08-22 8:41 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2006-08-22 20:25, dogbytes wrote:
whoa Queen K ~ thats one big mosaic! beautiful..how many hours did it take to fill in and grout?



wow that was fast!

Well, I was unemployed at the time, so I had the time.....but all in all it took two full weeks, 4 -6 hour days. 1 hour to grout that was the easy part.

All in all, better to do smaller items first....lol

A

[ This Message was edited by: Queen Kamehameha 2006-08-22 22:19 ]


 
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