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Tiki Central Forums Tiki Drinks and Food Pappy Takes a Bartending Course
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Pappy Takes a Bartending Course
Swanky
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 03, 2002
Posts: 4963
From: Hapa Haole Hideaway, TN
Posted: 2006-11-29 09:48 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2006-11-29 08:52, pappythesailor wrote:
Swanky, are you sure about the Mai Kai being the highest grossing restaurant in the nation? As much as I want to believe that, I just don't. If they're so rich, why does it still look like the Hurricane happened yesterday?...



Think about it for a second. They serve 300-1200 a night, with the cheapest thing on the menu at about $20, plus the $10 for the show, and drinks. They serve 1200 a night for long stretchs of their busy season. They also have been the number one seller of rum in the nation...

As for the looks of the place, that's all a long beaurocratic story. Part of it is due to current codes requiring things be done certain ways which in the end means a whole helluva lot of money, just to fix a roof. Part of it has to do with the fact that they still have not gotten a settlement from the insurance company for damage by Wilma, what, years ago? I mean, you won't go fix your roof for $8,000 and later have the insurance company give you $4,000. Or, find they were going to give you $15,000 and now they only give you $8,000 cuz that's what you spent...

The Mai Kai looks like it does, not because business is poor. Business is great. Nor does it look like that because they do not care. They care a lot. It's just a lot of factors that make it the way it is. Maybe by the time we all get down there for Hukilau 2007, the valet area and the main hall will be restored to what we expect. Let's hope so.


 
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thinkingbartender
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Apr 06, 2006
Posts: 62
From: London, England
Posted: 2006-12-20 9:59 pm   Permalink

Pappy,

Here is the Tom Collins article that I was referring to before:

The Great Tom Collins Hoax.

By George Sinclair.

Published by CLASS magazine; 7th October 2006.

One of the great test questions that one bartender can ask another is "What is the difference between a Tom Collins and a Gin Fizz?". The answer that the inquirer expects is usually that the Tom Collins is built over ice in a Collins Glass, and that the Gin Fizz is shaken, and then strained in an empty glass, whereupon the glass is filled with soda water. However, nothing could be further from the truth, in fact the Gin's Fizz is supplied by the addition of "Fizzy" water (i.e. carbonated soda water). You see, the Gin Fizz is a much older concoction than the Collins, dating back to the first appearance of carbonated water.

The Tom Collins is from a specific year and named after a specific event, with the event in question being the Great Tom Collins Hoax of 1874.

Gettysburg Compiler (1874)

"Have you seen Tom Collins"

"If you haven't, perhaps you had better do so, and as quick as you can, for he is talking about you in a very rough manner--calling you hard names, and altogether saying things about you that are rather calculated to induce people to believe there is nothing you wouldn't steal short of a red-hot stove. Other little things of that nature he is openly speaking in public places, and as a friend--although of course we don't wish to make you feel uncomfortable--we think you ought to take some notice of them and of Mr. Tom Collins. This is about the cheerful substance of a very successful practical joke which has been going the rounds of the city in the past week. It is not to this manor born, but belongs to New York, where it was played with immense success to crowded houses until it played out."

Steubenville Daily Herald (1874)

"Frantic young men rushed wildly through the streets of the city on Saturday hunting the libelous Tom Collins."

There are many other examples of people and newspaper journalists helping to propagate the Tom Collins Hoax, by printing false sightings and the like. The hoax gained such notoriety that it was used as the subject of music hall songs, one such being "Tom Collins: Or, I've been led astray," penned by W. D. Fountain (1874).

The first occurrence of the Tom Collins Recipe dates to the 1876 edition of Jerry Thomas' "The Bartenders Guide". Thomas listed 3 drinks called Tom Collins, the Tom Collins Whiskey, Tom Collins Brandy and, last but not least, the Tom Collins Gin.

Tom Collins Gin, Jerry Thomas (1876).

(Use small bar-glass.)
Take 5 or 6 dashes of gum syrup.
Juice of a small lemon.
1 large wine-glass of Gin.
2 or 3 lumps of ice;

Shake up well and strain into a large bar-glass. Fill up the glass with plain soda water and imbibe while it is lively.

The preparation for the Tom Collins is that of being shaken with ice and then being topped with soda water. The Gin Fizz, or Fiz as it was also called, was built in a glass, with or without ice, and then "fizzed" with carbonated water. If you wish to recreate a Silver Fizz, by adding egg-white (albumen), or a Golden Fizz, by adding egg-yolk, then you really will have to shake the ingredients beforehand.

Gin Fizz, Jerry Thomas (1862)

(Use medium bar-glass.)
Take 1 tea-spoonful of powdered white sugar.
3 dashes of Fresh Lemon Juice.
1 wine-glass of Holland Gin
1 small piece of Ice.

Fill up the glass with Apollinaris or Seltzer water, stir thoroughly and serve.

Notice that the Gin Fizz recipe uses Holland Gin, which refers to Dutch Gin, or Jenever as it is now known. It is a fact that in the 1800s, Hollands Gin (Jenever) was imported into the United States at a ratio of approximately 6 litres to every litre of English London Dry Gin. Also notice that the Gin Fizz is basically a Gin and Sodawater with a little bit of lemon juice, whereas the Tom Collins contains considerably more lemon juice, basically rendering it as a Gin and Sparkling Lemonade.

Moving on, we find ourselves contemplating the significance of the so-called "John Collins Limerick", which goes as follows:

'My name is John Collins,
head waiter at Limmer's,
Corner of Conduit Street,
Hanover Square,
My chief occupation is filling
brimmers
For all the young gentlemen
frequenters there.'

The above rhyme is cited by the International Bartenders Association (IBA) as being the proof that the John Collins drink preceded the Tom Collins and was also created in London, England. But where did this limerick come from? According to the IBA it was printed in a 1892 tome called "Drinks of the World", which contemporary newspaper sources at the time referred to as "a quaint compilation". The 1892 book compiled the limerick from a "discursive paper, pleasantly written by Sir MORELL MACKENZIE, M.D., ", written in mid-1891, and which was subsequently refuted in the next published issue of Punch magazine (Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 101, August 8, 1891). Apparently the good doctor, royal physician to be exact, mistranslated the song of "Jim Collins", his reason, according to the Punch correspondent, was to prove a link between the song and the creation of the drink, which did not, in all actuality, exist.

"My name is JIM COLLINS,
'Ead-vaiter at Limmers',
The corner of Conduck Street,
'Anover Square.
"And my hokkipashun
Is sarvin' out liquors
To such sportin' covies
As chance to come there."

Not only, it seems, is the oft-quoted "John Collins Limerick" an incorrectly certified "fact", but it doesn't mention any specific drink in either transcription as being created by the head-waiter, Jim or John. So what were the "covies" of Limmer's Hotel quaffing? Why the "famous Gin Punch" of course. While Gin Punch is similar to a Gin Sling, in that it uses gin, lemon juice, sugar and water, it is not similar enough to a Tom Collins, or John Collins, to be called such. The fact is that no drink other than a Gin Punch has been associated with Limmers, it seems that the idea of a drink known as "John Collins" predating the "Tom Collins" is totally down to the fantastical thinking of one man; Sir Morell MacKenzies, in 1891.

The final question that remains to be answered is whether the Tom Collins was named for its use of Old Tom Gin. The early recipes for the Tom Collins make no mention of Old Tom Gin, with the earliest recipe making no mention of Gin either. Remember that the first recorded Tom Collins recipe is from the second edition of Jerry Thomas' book, published in 1876, in which the Tom Collins is a class of drink, with the type of alcoholic spirit being used specified after the name Tom Collins (i.e. "-brandy", "-whiskey", "-gin"). It is others, who came after Thomas, that changed the Tom Collins into a purely Gin drink.

Cheers!

George
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thegreenman
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Aug 30, 2006
Posts: 73
From: 10.8 miles west of the Mai Kai
Posted: 2006-12-27 6:44 pm   Permalink

This is kinda off topic but with bartenders using cheatsheets like the ones from here: http://www.cheatsheetpublishing.com/bartendercheatsheet.html, what kind of drinks do you expect to get. The mai tai recipe is a real winner:






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thinkingbartender
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Apr 06, 2006
Posts: 62
From: London, England
Posted: 2006-12-28 01:11 am   Permalink

Surely if you are going to cheat it would be best to get the recipes correct: The Mai Tai and Manhattan aren't what I would call standard, nor historically correct.

Doesn't every bar keep a copy of the cocktail specifications behind the bar (laminated is optional)?
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Chip and Andy
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Joined: Jul 13, 2004
Posts: 2124
From: Corner table, Molokai Lounge, Mai-Kai.
Posted: 2006-12-28 1:08 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2006-12-28 01:11, thinkingbartender wrote:
...Doesn't every bar keep a copy of the cocktail specifications behind the bar (laminated is optional)?



Every one of those things I have seen has been so totally wrong as far as the recipes go. Well.... wrong is not quite right, more like a recipe cheater for complete bartending idiots. If I see one of those behind a bar I immediately switch my order to a basic that can't be screwed up like a SoCo on the rocks.

I understand thier value behind a bar because you have to be able to make whatever your customers order and there is only so much storage space in the brain.... but why do so many of those laminated cheaters have such horrible recipes on them? Is there a market for making one of those things with 'good' recipes on it? Maybe we as the Tiki Nation can make a billion of them and take them with us and give them to our favorite local non-tiki bars as a public service. Maybe then we might get a decent Mai-Tai at your average bar.



 
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Chip and Andy
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 13, 2004
Posts: 2124
From: Corner table, Molokai Lounge, Mai-Kai.
Posted: 2006-12-28 1:11 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2006-12-27 18:44, thegreenman wrote:
...



AND..... look at the recipe for a Vodka Martini? If you have to refer to a cheater like this to know that you use Vodka instead of Gin in a Vodka Martini should you really be on that side of the bar?

Thank you very much for sharing this Greenman, it has been the best laugh I have had all day!
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TikiJosh
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Joined: Feb 01, 2005
Posts: 735
Posted: 2006-12-28 3:28 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2006-12-28 13:11, Chip and Andy wrote:
Quote:

On 2006-12-27 18:44, thegreenman wrote:
...



AND..... look at the recipe for a Vodka Martini? If you have to refer to a cheater like this to know that you use Vodka instead of Gin in a Vodka Martini should you really be on that side of the bar?

Thank you very much for sharing this Greenman, it has been the best laugh I have had all day!



Holy crap. I saw the cheat sheet earlier, but didn't spend that much time really looking through it. I didn't even notice the martini until now. No Gin, use Vodka. Gee, you think?
Ridiculous.

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Chip and Andy
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 13, 2004
Posts: 2124
From: Corner table, Molokai Lounge, Mai-Kai.
Posted: 2006-12-29 06:47 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2006-12-27 18:44, thegreenman wrote:
The mai tai recipe is a real winner:






Can you post the rest of the cheat sheet if you have it. I suspect we would all get a really good laugh from it.

And, if you follow the link they have a Martini Cheat Sheet
with OVER 350 REcipes.

(I don't know if I should laugh or cry......)
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Who wants a Mai Tai?

[ This Message was edited by: Chip and Andy 2006-12-29 06:48 ]


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pappythesailor
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Joined: Jul 07, 2005
Posts: 1563
From: Mass.
Posted: 2006-12-29 07:09 am   Permalink

I dunno. It would take me as long to make sense of some of those abbreviated abbreviations as it would to just look it up. One day, when I've made all the drinks in Bum's book, I'm gonna try one of them martinis.

 
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BastardoSaffrin
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Apr 19, 2007
Posts: 73
From: Barcelona
Posted: 2007-07-25 02:13 am   Permalink

Pappy, great thread. Two comments:

1- It gave me loads of fun.
2- I started mixing just some months ago, and I consider I know some more things about drinks (at least about tiki drinks) than your teacher showed. My main resources of knowledge are TikiCentral and Beachbum's books, as everyone, but never attended any bartending course or whatever. And if in some months I know how to make a decent Mai Tai (at least my tiki-ignorant friends think so), after thirty years of reading Tiki Central my mixology skills will be great! Thanks you all!
3- Um, and sorry about my lousy English.

BS
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Scottes
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Joined: Feb 18, 2007
Posts: 490
From: A Little North Of Boston
Posted: 2007-07-25 03:30 am   Permalink

Oh my, what a hysterical thread! Thanks to BastardoSaffrin for reviving this.

And many thanks to Pappy for going through with this journalistic experiment and saving any of us from repeating his mistake. Priceless!
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pappythesailor
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 07, 2005
Posts: 1563
From: Mass.
Posted: 2007-07-25 08:24 am   Permalink

BS,
Your English is just fine.

I actually just re-read this thread. Seemed like a bad dream until I did. Man, that class sucked. I just want to say one more thing about it: I didn't make any of that class stuff up; it all really happened.


 
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telescopes
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Joined: May 06, 2007
Posts: 564
From: Palm Springs
Posted: 2007-07-25 12:07 pm   Permalink

Some of the things I didn't hear them discuss in your class were speed, efficiency, ordering the bottles for easy accessability, managing and using ice, preparation for the beginning of the day, bar speak for customers, the role of the bar keep with the customer, etc. I've often wanted to take a bar course, not just for the recipes, but for the knowledge of successful techniques and tips.

You learn a lot about home bartending here at TC, but nothing beats learning from successful professional experience in order to prepare for a job in the profession. Sadly, after 30 years, it sounds like your instructor never mastered much more than a quick pour.


 
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jpmartdog
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 27, 2005
Posts: 650
From: Amesbury, Mass
Posted: 2007-07-26 4:29 pm   Permalink

I was a bartender for most of the 10 years of the '80s, I worked at three establishments in the 10 year span and always two of the "joints" at a time to come up with 7 days work and 9 shifts a week!
Bartending in the 80's was just different - the old Mr. Boston Bartenders guide was the bible, but that said... you poured drinks the way your bar manager wanted you to!

I worked at a Resort hotel and Restaurant in Hampton Beach NH (The Ashworth/ the Patriot Lounge) Live bands 7 nights a week catering to the 40 to 70 year old crowd. We served all the classics - Martinis, Manhattans, Rob Roys, Old Fashions, Grasshoppers, Golden Cadillacs, Greyhounds (Vodka/Grapefruit) Salty Dogs (Vodka/Grapefruit with a salted Rim - even Blackberry Brandy and Soda. We also made Pina Coladas and Strawberry Daiquiris. We'd pour fast and pour with two bottles in each hand. After hours the bar manager would have us there until the sun started two rise lining up the bar with shot glasses drinking baby stingers and raiding the restaurant walk in for late night snacks. Can't tell you how many nights I'd race home trying to beat the sun up and get a few hours sleep before starting all over again!

I also worked at a high end multi room nightclub /Disco - The Palace in Saugus Mass, just down the street from the Kowloon! The entertainment complex had 7 themed rooms, 35 bars and 35 bartenders each night. My shift usually started at 10pm and went till 1pm. Flashing Lights/ booming music and drinks as fast as you could make em - every bartender rang out at least $1000/shift! That's a lot of 3 and 4 dollar drinks in 80's time. Here's the kick at the Palace - management would place spotters at the bar to observe us. Often the manager would bring a new cash drawer to your register, run the tape and take your drawer... if it didn't balance you were relieved on the spot and an auxiliary bartender was waiting in the wings to replace you. Each night the manager would come by with two bottles of water and a shot glass and test your ability to pour an accurate shot - Bottles must be completely inverted vertically in the pour! Tough work, strict standards and a lot of rules!

Things are different now - I don't think I could even step behind a bar - with all the new variations and all the new bartender created drinks that sweep the nation in a fast paced trend! Even all the new martini variations - never had em in the 80's - just Martinis's, Vodka Maritinis and Gimlets!

I think that's why I love to find a classic Tiki/Polynesian/Chinese "joint" Classic drinks made with classic recipes!

Just thought I'd tell you my bartender story! They were the good ole days to me!

[ This Message was edited by: jpmartdog 2007-07-26 16:42 ]


 
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Chip and Andy
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 13, 2004
Posts: 2124
From: Corner table, Molokai Lounge, Mai-Kai.
Posted: 2007-07-27 05:47 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2007-07-26 16:29, jpmartdog wrote:...I think that's why I love to find a classic Tiki/Polynesian/Chinese "joint" Classic drinks made with classic recipes!

Just thought I'd tell you my bartender story! They were the good ole days to me!



OK, under the premise that the Pizza Boy never orders Pizza...... Now that you have 'retired' from tending bar I have two questions for you:

First, What does your home-bar look like? Second, as an extension to the first question, at the end of the day when you make a cocktail what do you pour? I mean what is your favorite go-to recipe for that one last cocktail to be had during 'me-time?'


 
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