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Tiki Central Forums » » General Tiki » » The Gallery of Regrettable Tiki Paint Jobs
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The Gallery of Regrettable Tiki Paint Jobs
Psycho Tiki D
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Oct 13, 2006
Posts: 1810
From: The river Styx, can you pay the toll?
Posted: 2008-04-18 4:31 pm   Permalink



[ This Message was edited by: Psycho Tiki D 2008-04-21 14:36 ]


 
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JenTiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 16, 2006
Posts: 1853
From: Wandering the eastern shores
Posted: 2008-04-18 5:17 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2008-04-17 20:44, bigbrotiki wrote:
NOTE": This thread shall be reserved for examples of classic mid-century Tikis having been painted over, and is NOT intended for the following:
A.) Garish Party City paper Tiki and other discount store Tiki art. Bad or good, it is what it is. We cannot change it, and we can bitch about it in other threads.
B.) Contemporary artists' examples, be it graphic or sculptural.
It is my hope that the wrongness of the Tiki crimes of the past will inform the artists of today to become better acquainted with a sensible use of colors in their efforts to continue the great tradition of American Tiki culture.



 
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Psycho Tiki D
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Oct 13, 2006
Posts: 1810
From: The river Styx, can you pay the toll?
Posted: 2008-04-18 5:30 pm   Permalink



[ This Message was edited by: Psycho Tiki D 2008-04-21 14:37 ]


 
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Koolau
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Sep 23, 2006
Posts: 323
From: Oahu, Hawaii
Posted: 2008-04-19 02:29 am   Permalink

Is there really any effective way to remove paint from those tiki? Most look to be carved out of palm wood, which is highly porous and probably just soaked up the paint.

Maybe all that can be done is to fade the colors to more natural tones.


 
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Tamapoutini
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 30, 2006
Posts: 1530
From: Aotearoa (New Zealand)
Posted: 2008-04-19 02:39 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2008-04-17 20:44, bigbrotiki wrote:

"Harsh color detracts so much from the sculptural quality of the carving that a sensitive eye is offended."




Great thread. You are SO right (Terrence & BigBro) - they are SO wrong!

my 2c

Tama


 
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ikitnrev
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 27, 2002
Posts: 1313
From: D.C. / Virginia
Posted: 2008-04-19 11:31 am   Permalink

Here is a picture of the two tiki poles I obtained from the former Honolulu Restaurant, before I stood them upright. The flash does make them appear brighter than they were in the restaurant.



I did talk with the Chans, the former owners of the Honolulu. These tiki poles were already painted in these bright colors when they purchased the restaurant in 1978, and were never repainted or retouched from then until the closing in 2004. The poles must have been painted by the original owner/designer, who only ran the Honolulu for 10 months before selling it to the Chans.

So I will keep these poles colors as they currently exist. My sentiment is for the Honolulu, the Chans, and my memories of the place, and for this unique case, leaving the bright colors seems to be the best thing to do, especially since I promised them that I would treat them well.

I guess someday, I will pass away or transfer ownership of the poles to someone else, and it might be easier for that person to repaint/stain the poles, since they might have no personal memories of the Honolulu itself.

By the way, there were two outside poles that were once brightly colored, but then later painted in a single brown color around 1979/80. Sabina is the proud owner of those poles.

Vern


 
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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11266
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2008-04-19 11:55 am   Permalink

Vern, I think we discussed this before: In my time frame of the history of Tiki culture, 1978 is smack tab in the middle of the "Devolution" phase, so it makes sense that these babies came like that, probably from Orchids of Hawaii, which at that time had fully gone over to the clown color side. So in a sense they are historically correct, and if you have pleasant memories associated with them, it is what it is.

 
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Mr&Mrs BPHoptiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Nov 25, 2006
Posts: 128
From: Burbank,Ca.
Posted: 2008-04-19 2:51 pm   Permalink

Just my own personal experience and opinions that I am speaking here. I want to reply to this point of view:

"we're not talking about Van Gogh or Rembrandt here, tiki art was POP art made for commercial purposes and often only distantly connected to any "real" cultural relevence."

This in not my recollection of the Tiki that I experienced during the 60’s. We knew the difference between PoP Art and Tiki, and the two were rarely mixed. There was a keen interest in authenticity and the cultural background of Tiki. Painted tikis, which were extremely rare, were viewed as a commercialized abomination. I understand that for some, especially those younger than myself, memories of garishly painted tikis were their first encounter with what was supposed to be tiki and it left them with a fond impression. All I can say to that, and please don’t take offense, is that what you experienced was unfortunately part of what Sven correctly calls “Tiki devolution.”

MrsHoptiki




 
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GatorRob
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Joined: Aug 20, 2004
Posts: 1772
From: 3 hrs 33 mins to paradise
Posted: 2008-04-19 3:07 pm   Permalink

I'm surprised nobody has posted the often-photographed Mai-Kai Barney West yet. (Kern, if you're reading, close your eyes.)



This is the only picture I have of him without the paint job:




[ This Message was edited by: GatorRob 2008-04-19 15:17 ]


 
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beadtiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 24, 2007
Posts: 929
From: Bothell, Washington
Posted: 2008-04-19 4:10 pm   Permalink

I think a lot of people associated the Tiki Totems with Native American Totems which WERE highly colored. I'm not surprised as there are some similarities in their appearances - the two Honolulu Tikis of Vern's are a good example. We weren't exactly "hip" to cultural differences in the early part of the 20th century; "mashing" together art from different cultures was pretty common - not to mention the people themselves (e.g. "Orientals").

 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 495
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2008-04-19 10:53 pm   Permalink

All that unnecessary color. How sad. Makes me want to commit graffiti to put it all bad to muted monotone. (Not that I would. Laws and all)

 
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Kaiwaza
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 06, 2003
Posts: 467
From: Waikiki Beach, Hawaii
Posted: 2008-04-20 4:22 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2008-04-19 14:51, Mr&Mrs BPHoptiki wrote:
Just my own personal experience and opinions that I am speaking here. I want to reply to this point of view:

"we're not talking about Van Gogh or Rembrandt here, tiki art was POP art made for commercial purposes and often only distantly connected to any "real" cultural relevence."

This in not my recollection of the Tiki that I experienced during the 60’s. We knew the difference between PoP Art and Tiki, and the two were rarely mixed. There was a keen interest in authenticity and the cultural background of Tiki. Painted tikis, which were extremely rare, were viewed as a commercialized abomination. I understand that for some, especially those younger than myself, memories of garishly painted tikis were their first encounter with what was supposed to be tiki and it left them with a fond impression. All I can say to that, and please don’t take offense, is that what you experienced was unfortunately part of what Sven correctly calls “Tiki devolution.”

MrsHoptiki




I would like to respond/comment on this statement. I'm 46, and have grown up enjoying "tiki" culture. I'm just not sure how I could possibly consider a "movement" or "style" that combined Polynesian artifacts (many bearing no resemblence to any actual diety or personification, some made as trinkets specifically to sell to tourists), monkeys, fezes, animal prints (all unknown in Polynesia), music written & performed nearly completely by Mainland Americans (intentionally having "fun" with Oriental, Polynesian, Latin, African music), drinks with names like "Zombie" and "Missionary Downfall", Caribbean Rum, relocating geographic entities (Bali Hai) as being "culturaly authentic."
Don't get me wrong, I love the whole tiki culture, but..did I miss something in thinking it was based on a FANTASY?
_________________
Paradise is a state of mind.


 
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alohacurrent
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 16, 2006
Posts: 238
From: Sacramento
Posted: 2008-04-20 8:27 pm   Permalink

Here's a tree-dweller tiki from the international marketplace, Waikiki



 
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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11266
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2008-04-20 9:50 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2008-04-20 16:22, Kaiwaza wrote:
I'm just not sure how I could possibly consider a "movement" or "style" that combined Polynesian artifacts (many bearing no resemblence to any actual diety or personification, some made as trinkets specifically to sell to tourists), monkeys, fezes, animal prints (all unknown in Polynesia), music written & performed nearly completely by Mainland Americans (intentionally having "fun" with Oriental, Polynesian, Latin, African music), drinks with names like "Zombie" and "Missionary Downfall", Caribbean Rum, relocating geographic entities (Bali Hai) as being "culturaly authentic."



That is exactly what I have tried (in many people's eyes successfully) to prove and to establish with the "Book of Tiki":
Tiki style is an authentic facet of American popular culture. As such it has had its heyday, its peak, where all stylistic elements were at their best. AFTER this peak, it became degraded and watered down, or NOT AUTHENTIC 50s/60s Polynesian pop, and eventually disappeared almost completely. Garishly painted Tikis clearly are signs of this degradation of an authentic pop culture style.

Some people get this, others don't.


 
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Kaiwaza
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 06, 2003
Posts: 467
From: Waikiki Beach, Hawaii
Posted: 2008-04-21 11:24 am   Permalink

Well, this is getting off the thread, but I don't want to be misunderstood.
I understand the concept of "50s/60s American Polynesian Pop culture/art" and it's deevolution.
I'm taking issue with an earlier reply to my post that stated there was "great interest" in the authenticity of tikis and that tiki & pop art were not mixed back in the 1960s. THAT is what I am taking issue with. It's kind of like saying, "Hey, I bought all the Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass" LPs back in the 1960s, so I was very interested in preserving & perpetuating authentic mariachi & Mexican culture. And then, making a claim that, somehow, Herb Alpert really WASN'T a commercial pop artist. You know what I mean?
It's not to say here weren't ANY people interested in Polynesian authenticity in 60s Polynesian Pop, but it certainly wasn't the driving force.

_________________
Paradise is a state of mind.

[ This Message was edited by: Kaiwaza 2008-04-21 11:26 ]


 
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