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The real Dr. Funk
thePorpoise
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 23, 2011
Posts: 1162
From: Tampa Bay
Posted: 2012-03-18 09:42 am   Permalink

did they ever locate the Doktor's memorial stone reportedly placed by his friends near Lake Lanutoo?

 
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TikiTomD
Grand Member (4 years)  

Joined: Sep 20, 2009
Posts: 671
From: Flagler Beach, FL
Posted: 2012-03-18 10:33 am   Permalink

Great stuff, Sven! I especially enjoyed the mental imagery evoked by that quote from the 1907 Cyclopedia of Samoa...


Quote:

On 2012-03-17 22:09, bigbrotiki wrote:

"There is no one among the Europeans who is more popular...the familiar sight of him walking the beach with cigar and cane...as capable doctor and reliable friend he is indispensable to this place..."




In the Maubach article was a letter from Dr. Funk accompanying the 1902 donation of his Oceanic collection to the Neubrandenburg Museum...




The German ethnologist, Frank Reiter, who worked on the Museum’s Oceanic collection in 1995, was quoted from a letter in Maubach’s article as stating...

Quote:
Concerning the existing Oceanic ethnographica in the Regional Museum of Neubrandenburg, acquired for the predominant part in 1894 by purchase and in 1902 by donation of the physician Dr. Bernhard Funk, a native of Neubrandenburg, it is a remarkable collection of cultural items from the individual island groups of Melanesia and Polynesia... Overall, the collection is of significant cultural and historic value.




Regarding Dr. Funk’s dismissal by the German Firm in 1881, I can speculate on a couple of reasons. He was a self-confident, even stubbornly independent soul who did not blindly follow orders. That trait led to difficulty later in his relationship with Dr. Wilhelm Solf, the German Governor of Samoa, and it likely caused him to clash with Theodore Weber, the director of the German Firm in Samoa. Weber was known as a talented, but imperious man who tolerated no dissention. I can easily imagine that Dr. Funk was deliberately slow to implement some request from Weber, and Weber fired him for insubordination. The controversy surrounding his marriage to Leonora Hayes, daughter of Bully Hayes, deceased South Seas pirate, and the subsequent embarrassment from its messy public disintegration in June 1881 may also have been a factor. Theodore Weber did not suffer employees who caused trouble.

Maubach’s article makes clear that Dr. Funk’s subsequent marriage to Senitima, the young and beautiful daughter of the Samoan chief, Talea, was a happy one. She was a loving individual who charmed everyone.

Regardless of personal loyalties, Dr. Funk carefully steered clear of the politics of colonial rivalries and Samoan internal strife, remaining professionally neutral so he could concentrate on treatment and care of his patients, who came from all nationalities. Maubach’s article goes on to state that Dr. Funk employed a mainly native Samoan support staff in his private practice. Funk himself was fluent in spoken and written Samoan.

From Maubach’s article, we learn that during the Franco-Prussian War, Dr. Funk worked under Professor Bernhard von Langenbeck, a famous German surgeon who was an authority on battlefield medicine. According to Wikipedia, von Langenbeck is best known today as the "father of the surgical residency” and also as the founder of Langenbeck's Archives of Surgery, the oldest medical journal of surgery in the world. He was cited as a bold and skillful surgeon who preferred not to operate when there was some prospect for success by other means. So, Dr. Funk learned his profession guided by the best and brightest of the times. After the war, following dismissal from the Prussian Army, and before his employment as a medical officer for HAPAG, Dr. Funk temporarily worked in the field of cardiology near Berlin.

Quote:

On 2012-03-17 22:09, bigbrotiki wrote:

Apparently he had two traditional Samoan Fales constructed behind his house in which many festivities took place (backyard Tiki Bars?).



Regarding those Samoan Fales, Dr. Funk may have indeed had pre-Tiki Tiki Bars. As we’ll later see in the recounting of his interactions with Robert Louis Stevenson, Dr. Funk was a party animal!


From the Mosaik article, here is the title page of Dr. Funk’s book on the Samoan language with appended meteorological observations...




-Tom


 
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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11097
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2012-03-18 10:34 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2012-03-18 09:42, thePorpoise wrote:
did they ever locate the Doktor's memorial stone reportedly placed by his friends near Lake Lanutoo?



No. The article shows a photo of his gravestone in Neubrandenburg (which is not there anymore today), and the writer even muses that the good doctor would have probably preferred to have been laid to rest next to his good friend R.L. Stevenson, but I guess he was not aware of that memorial.


 
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TikiTomD
Grand Member (4 years)  

Joined: Sep 20, 2009
Posts: 671
From: Flagler Beach, FL
Posted: 2012-03-22 09:59 am   Permalink

During intermission, while I’m pouring through the wealth of Robert Louis Stevenson information related to Dr. Funk, I’d like to share a couple of promising 19th century Southern Hemisphere cures for the drinking man or woman who needs to repair a liver after enjoying too many of those potent South Seas cocktails. Careful now, as there may be no return...

The Otago Witness December 8, 1892








North Otago Times September 18, 1886





The Grey River Argus January 16, 1891




The Grey River Argus January 20, 1891




Now here’s an unrecoverable drinking error...

The Otago Daily Times July 11, 1888




-Tom


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Q-tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Sep 22, 2011
Posts: 195
From: East TN
Posted: 2012-03-22 11:02 am   Permalink

Once again, fabulous finds TTD!

I'll have a Golden Remedy #2 and some Eno's Fruit Salt. You may keep your #1, Specific and your Carbolic Acid (Poor sot).

This makes for great reading.

Cheers!


 
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Club Nouméa
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 03, 2010
Posts: 340
From: Wanganui
Posted: 2012-03-22 6:06 pm   Permalink

They still make Eno's fruit salt, although I don't know if they still make such extravagant claims about it...

_________________

Toto, j'ai l'impression que nous ne sommes plus au Kansas !


 
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TikiTomD
Grand Member (4 years)  

Joined: Sep 20, 2009
Posts: 671
From: Flagler Beach, FL
Posted: 2012-03-23 05:47 am   Permalink

Aloha, Q-tiki and Club Nouméa! I ran across those great ads doing the Dr. Funk research. They were so outrageous that I just had to share them. CN, I had no idea, but indeed, Eno’s Fruit Salt is still manufactured today by GlaxoSmithKline. There’s even an entry for it in Wikipedia. It is apparently similar in its composition to the antacid, Alka-Seltzer. So, Q-tiki, you're in luck for that one!


Here’s a write-up on Eno’s Fruit Salt at The Quack Doctor web site and a really interesting historical overview at B.J. Cossar’s clipper ships & naval war history web site. From the latter site, “Two of the more remote places that Eno's was shipped to at this time were Thursday and Easter Islands. At this time [the 1920s] Easter Island only received mail once every nine months!”

Eno’s prolific ads and posters supported artists everywhere...










Here’s the modern product...




-Tom


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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11097
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2012-03-23 09:19 am   Permalink

So is this where HE got his name from!?:



http://hilobrow.com/2009/05/15/hilo-hero-brian-eno/

Perhaps this medication could actually save our rum-riddled liver?



Enough, the above advertisements have convinced me: I ordered me a bottle!
See what you've done now, Tom!

...as a word of caution: It is used frequently as baking soda, and they are taking it of the market in Britain. One wonders why...

But back to OUR tonic at hand here: The DR. FUNK libation!


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TikiTomD
Grand Member (4 years)  

Joined: Sep 20, 2009
Posts: 671
From: Flagler Beach, FL
Posted: 2012-03-23 4:11 pm   Permalink

That “cheerful livers” ad is a hoot, Sven!

Okay, back to topic...

----------

Robert Louis Stevenson (RLS or Louis, as known to family and acquaintances), together with wife Fanny, step-son Lloyd Osbourne, and mother, Maggie Stevenson, sailed from San Francisco on June 28, 1888, for the South Seas aboard the chartered yacht Casco, seeking a healthier climate for the frail Louis, who suffered frequent respiratory ailments...




Boston Evening Transcript February 21, 1889 (page 4)




In the years ahead, RLS was to journey all over Oceania, as traced on this map of the region...




On the way to Hawai`i, they visited the Marquesas Islands, as well as Tahiti. In Hawai`i, they spent some time with Fanny’s daughter (by a previous marriage) Belle, as well as Belle’s artist husband Joe Strong, and their son (Louis and Fanny’s grandson) Austin. In the latter part of June, 1889, Louis, Fanny, Lloyd Osbourne and Joe Strong departed Honolulu on the schooner Equator, heading to the Gilbert Islands and eventually reaching Samoa in December of 1889.

On the schooner Equator was a young deck hand and cook by the name of Thomson Murray MacCallum (Murray), a New Zealand farm boy who dreamed of adventure in the South Seas and acted on that dream by stowing away on an island trading steamer, the Janet Nicol, which dropped him off in Samoa. After initially working as an apprentice carpenter and blacksmith in Apia, he was hired by the British trading firm McArthur and Company, a local competitor to the German Firm. McArthur and Company trained him and put him to work as a copra trader. Eventually, chance would place him as a crew member of the Equator for the voyage with Stevenson and his family. Murray MacCallum subsequently immigrated to the United States, residing in Los Angeles. In 1934, he published a memoir of his experiences, Adrift in the South Seas – including Adventures with Robert Louis Stevenson. I’m lucky to have a copy of this, signed by the author.

In the beginning of his book, Murray experiences the allure of the exotic South Sea maiden...




While on Apia, Samoa, one of his colleagues at McArthur and Company, a young man recently arrived from Auckland, became quite ill, so MacCallum called on someone uniquely qualified to help, our good Dr. Funk...





The last statement, ”He was a clever physician, but his love for cocktails and craving for the favours of young girls was his finish”, is interesting in that even the Peter Maubach article in the Mosaik did not elaborate on what the “long illness” was that required Dr. Funk go to Berlin for treatment in the last year of his life. Could it have been a failing liver from too many cocktails?

From MacCallum’s book...




While on board the Equator, RLS celebrated a birthday. Lloyd Osbourne, Louis’ step-son, photographed the party on the deck of the schooner, and that photo is in MacCallum’s book. Louis is standing in the back on the extreme left (wearing no hat), while Fanny is seated to the right of center, wearing a straw hat and polka-dotted Mother Hubbard dress; Captain Dennis Reid of the Equator is standing behind and to the right of Fanny, wearing a Tam o’Shanter and holding the ears of the cabin boy...




MacCallum’s book is dedicated ”to the memory of Robert Louis Stevenson”. In recalling Louis, MacCallum stated that ”The familiar sight of the ‘Frail Warrior’, as Carré calls him, propped in his bunk with a writing pad against his knees, either with a pensive faraway look in his eyes, or else feverishly covering page after page with his manuscript, will always linger in my memory.” He also found remarkable Stevenson’s ”happy faculty of always seeing the bright side of everything.”

When the Equator arrived in Apia, Samoa in the early part of December, 1889, the Stevensons stayed for a while at the home of Harry Jay Moors, an American businessman and long-time Apia resident who had befriended them on arrival. Louis found the climate highly agreeable and decided he would make a home there. After a while they rented a cottage, while Moors negotiated the purchase of land on which they would eventually build their Samoan home. In February, 1890, they departed Samoa for Sydney, Australia aboard the steamship Lübeck, with plans to soon return to England.


Robert Louis Stevenson graphic portrait from Vailima Letters...




To be continued...

-Tom


Edit Note: Added newspaper notice of RLS arrival in Honolulu.

[ This Message was edited by: TikiTomD 2012-03-27 10:09 ]


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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11097
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2012-03-23 4:35 pm   Permalink

Nice portrait of the man. Must be from a photo, but seems more life-like than one. The rendering style reminds me of Robert Crumb's:



..who is very adept in copying old illustrative styles, of course.


 
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TikiTomD
Grand Member (4 years)  

Joined: Sep 20, 2009
Posts: 671
From: Flagler Beach, FL
Posted: 2012-03-24 1:30 pm   Permalink

Sven, both the RLS and Robert Crumb graphic portraits indeed do look more alive than a photo... for me, it’s primarily in the eyes, though there is in each case something about the facial expression as well.

-----------

The Stevenson’s arrival in Sydney, Australia in February, 1890 was newsworthy. In the article below, it’s clear that Louis was already well attuned to Samoan rivalries and politics...

The Southland Times February 28, 1890








After the Stevensons arrived in Sydney, Louis got ill. There was just something about Sydney’s climate that didn’t agree with RLS, but he seemed to do especially well when at sea in the South Pacific, so Fanny and Louis aborted immediate plans to return to England, instead booking passage aboard the steamer Janet Nicol for a three-month plus cruise among the South Sea islands...

The Evening Post April 22, 1890





This was an enchanting adventure for the two of them, and it was captured in a 1914 book by Fanny Stevenson based upon her diary, The Cruise of the “Janet Nicol” Among the South Sea Islands. The book included some photos...






Here is one of my favorite photos of Louis and Fanny, taken on Butaritari in the Gilbert Islands...




On May 1, 1890, they anchored for a day or so in Apia Harbor, Samoa, just their second ever arrival there. While in Apia, they saw a friend, the injured old Samoan chief Sitione. It’s clear from this passage in the book that Louis and Fanny already knew Dr. Funk, presumably from their initial stay in Apia...





There’s no ambiguity about who Fanny is referring to as the doctor, for her diary published in the 1955 book edited by Charles Neider, Our Samoan Adventure, contains this entry from October 23, 1890...




It seems that our good doctor was considered a “clever physician” not without reason. While Fanny refers to a large Samoan bat (flying fox) in the passage above as a vampire bat, they are in fact fruit eaters, not vampires.

At the conclusion of their South Seas cruise on the Janet Nicol, Fanny and Louis disembarked back at Sydney. Louis again fell ill, so they headed back to Samoa on the steamship Lübeck.

To be continued...

-Tom


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TikiTomD
Grand Member (4 years)  

Joined: Sep 20, 2009
Posts: 671
From: Flagler Beach, FL
Posted: 2012-03-25 3:21 pm   Permalink

Arriving in back in Apia, Samoa in September of 1890, the Stevensons made their home on 400 acres of property that were 600 feet up Vaea Mountain, itself about 1500 feet high. The land had been previously purchased on their behalf by Harry Jay Moors for $4,000 USD. Moors had built them a cottage that was later improved and expanded to accommodate Louis’ mother, Maggie Stevenson. Moors had also hired native Samoans to make an eight-foot wide road from Apia to the cottage up the heavily wooded mountainside. The location was approximately 2.5 to 3 miles from Apia. Louis named his home Vailima, meaning “five rivers” although only four streams flowed at the time, but Louis found the name pleasing. According to Moors in his 1910 book With Stevenson in Samoa, there was a 60-foot high waterfall on the northwest corner of the property. At the time that Moors published his book, there were only two streams still flowing around the property...

Andrew, Thomas, 1855-1939 (Photographer) : Home of Robert Louis Stevenson, Vailima, Samoa, ca 1890
Reference Number: 1/2-002519-F

"Vailima", the home of Robert Louis Stevenson at Vailima, Samoa, circa 1890; photograph taken by Thomas Andrew



Photo from With Stevenson in Samoa...




Photo from Our Samoan Adventure...




Photo from With Stevenson in Samoa...




Vailima was home to not only the extended Stevenson family, but also to a number of native Samoans who worked for them in various capacities as seen in these photos from Our Samoan Adventure...






Louis had a long-running disagreement with Dr. Funk over what Louis claimed was the salubrious effect of the Samoan climate and environment on his health, as noted in this letter from Louis to Sidney Colvin in Our Samoan Adventure...




Then, Louis speaking to Moors in With Stevenson in Samoa...





Louis with his horse Jack, that he had bought from Moors...




In this August, 1893 letter from Louis to Sidney Colvin in Vailima Letters...




Elephantiasis was a scourge at the time and still is present in Samoa and in many other places of the world. It results from lymphatic filariasis caused by the parasitic infection of nematode worms that “nest” in the lymphatic system and reproduce, leading to damage and fluid obstruction. It is transmitted by the bite of the female Aedes polynesiensis, or Polynesian mosquito, that carries the worms’ larvae from human to human. The result is gross disfigurement and severe physical disability...

Man with elephantiasis of the arm, 1 January 1897
Reference Number: PA1-o-545-19

Man with elephantiasis of the arm. Photograph taken in Samoa, on the 1st of January 1897, by Thomas Andrew.



Though the parasite that caused elephantiasis was known by circa 1877, effective treatment was not. It appears, however, that Dr. Funk had developed a remedy for it, based on this May 22, 1893 diary entry by Fanny appearing in the 1920 book by Nellie Van de Grift Sanchez, The Life of Mrs Robert Louis Stevenson, based on letters and diaries...




Back to the subject of Louis’ health and the effects of the Samoan climate on it, Sidney Colvin, who regularly received letters from RLS, offered this summary judgment in the Epilogue of Vailima Letters...




Though Louis may have enjoyed some of the best health of his life, Dr. Funk remained in high demand at Vailima to attend RLS and his family members on a professional as well as social basis, as seen in these letters from Maggie Stevenson, RLS’ mother, from the 1906 book edited by Marie Clothilde Balfour, Letters from Samoa, 1891-1895, by Mrs. M.I. Stevenson...

July 1, 1891




October 2, 1892




October 28, 1892




August 26, 1894




In this last letter, we find that Dr. Funk managed to injure himself on a malanga, the Samoan equivalent of a room crawl that we might have at a Tiki event, except that instead of partying from room to room in a hotel complex over a single evening, the party of a malanga moves from village to village over a period of days. Here’s a newspaper article that describes it in Robert Louis Stevenson’s own words...

The Sydney Morning Herald October 5, 1895 (page 4)




To be continued...

-Tom

[ This Message was edited by: TikiTomD 2012-03-26 08:23 ]


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TikiTomD
Grand Member (4 years)  

Joined: Sep 20, 2009
Posts: 671
From: Flagler Beach, FL
Posted: 2012-03-27 10:43 am   Permalink

Though Dr. Funk was the only resident physician in Western Samoa, he routinely got assistance from the doctors and medics stationed on warships anchored at Apia Harbor, be they German, British or American. This especially helped in times of civil warfare or when epidemics were raging through the island populace. These ships’ doctors also filled in when Dr. Funk was out on malanga or vacation, and when he was himself incapacitated, as observed in Sven Mönter’s 2010 University of Auckland PhD thesis, “Dr. Augustin Krämer: A German Ethnologist in the Pacific”...




The Stevenson household made frequent demands on Dr. Funk in his professional capacity, and on those occasions when he wasn’t able to immediately respond to their call because of other patients, he got an earful, as in this example from The Letters of Robert Louis Stevenson – Volume 8, edited by Booth and Mehew...

January 8, 1893 (Louis writing to Graham Balfour)




January 7, 1893 (Louis writing to Maggie Stevenson)



Louis really enjoyed Funk’s discomfort at what was an obviously idle threat. This was quickly forgotten, as Funk was truly good at what he did, and he was a close friend of Louis. Some more examples of Funk’s service on behalf of the Stevenson family, again from The Letters of Robert Louis Stevenson – Volume 8...


May 21, 1893 (Louis writing to Maggie Stevenson)



Young Isla Stilwell succumbed to tuberculosis less than two years later on February 5, 1895.

October 5, 1894 (Louis writing to Dora Norton Williams)



Belle was Isobel Strong, Louis’ step-daughter, to the immediate right of Louis in the 1893 photograph below (photo from this excellent RLS
web site)...




Louis stated in Our Samoan Adventure and originally in A Footnote to History...

Quote:
Should Apia ever choose a coat of arms, I have a motto ready: “Enter Rumor painted full of tongues.” The majority of the natives do extremely little; the majority of whites are merchants with some four mails in the month, shopkeepers with some ten or twenty customers a day, and gossip is the common resource for all. The town hums to the day’s news, and the bars are crowded with amateur politicians... The quarters are so close and the scale is so small, that perhaps not any one can be trusted always to preserve his temper. Everyone tells everything he knows; that is our country sickness. Nearly everyone has been betrayed at times, and told a trifle more, the way our sickness takes the predisposed. And the news flies, and the tongues wag, and fists are shaken. Pot boil and cauldron bubble!



That is a good lead into the following portion of our tale: Belle and her husband, Joe Strong, had a publically messy divorce while in Samoa. Louis heard through gossip that Dr. Funk had said something favorable in regards to Joe, greatly upsetting him...

October 29, 1892 (Louis writing to Sidney Colvin)





In this excerpt from Ernest Mehew’s 1997 compilation, Selected Letters of Robert Louis Stevenson, Louis recounts the ugly outcome of conflict between warring native Samoan factions, with the dead and dying accumulating even at Dr. Funk’s house...


July 9, 1893



New Zealand and Samoan group, during the 1888-1889 civil war in Samoa, 1899
Reference Number: 1/1-006636-G

New Zealand and Samoan group, photographed in 1899 by reporter Malcolm Ross, during the 1888-1889 civil war in Samoa. Includes troops crouching with rifles. Two Samoan women stand on the left.



Naval machine gun crew with maxim gun, during the Samoan civil war of 1888-1889, [between 1888-1889]
Reference Number: 1/1-006638-G

Naval machine gun crew with maxim gun, during the Samoan civil war of 1888-1889. Photographer unidentified.



Samoan war canoe, between 1891-1939
Reference Number: PAColl-5426-02

Samoan war canoe, photographed by Thomas Andrew between 1891 and 1939



To be continued...

-Tom

Edit Note: Replaced photo of Isobel (Belle) with one of higher resolution.

[ This Message was edited by: TikiTomD 2012-03-29 11:13 ]


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TikiTomD
Grand Member (4 years)  

Joined: Sep 20, 2009
Posts: 671
From: Flagler Beach, FL
Posted: 2012-03-27 4:53 pm   Permalink

Joe Strong, husband of Isobel (Belle), Louis’ step-daughter, is an interesting character. An artist and photographer, he was born in Connecticut but grew up in Honolulu and then Oakland, California. He married Isobel Osbourne, Fanny’s daughter by an earlier marriage, in 1879. Joe went island hopping in the South Seas with the Stevensons at their invitation. He and Belle joined RLS and family at Vailima in 1891. Joe was a friend of H.J. Moors, the American merchant in Apia. He had a long-standing affair with a Samoan woman. He also had a drinking and drug problem. Belle divorced him in 1892 for infidelity, and RLS legally adopted their son, Austin.

Joe Strong standing on the porch at Vailima...



Dan McNay has a
novel in progress, The Truth About Treasure Island, where “Robert Louis Stevenson and Joe Strong, his friend and son-in-law, face off in the South Pacific.” The book’s premise is that an old diary of Joe Strong is found hidden behind the drawer of a beat up antique chess table cheaply acquired from a San Francisco thrift shop. The diary is an unvarnished recounting of Joe’s life in Samoa with the Stevensons, revealed for the first time in this book. You can read the partially completed novel, founded on what is actually known about Joe, at Dan’s web site. It’s an interesting read, so far. Caution: graphic descriptions of Joe’s sexual encounters with his young Samoan paramour, Fa`apio, are embedded in the story...



-Tom


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Surfacabra
Member

Joined: Mar 28, 2012
Posts: 5
From: Space Coast, Florida
Posted: 2012-03-28 5:44 pm   Permalink

Stupendous research Tom! You have brought the doctor, his legends and his image back into the warm glow of tiki bars everywhere. In the process, inspiring many to explore the drink named in his honor.

 
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