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Tiki Central Forums » » General Tiki » » Paul Gauguin
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Paul Gauguin
captnkirk
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Nov 06, 2002
Posts: 322
From: Hockessin, Delaware
Posted: 2009-03-24 04:07 am   Permalink

I posted this a while a ago in the "Tikis in Films thread", but I thought this would be a good place for it as well.

I saw one recently on DVD. It was called Paradise Found, it is a biopic about the life of painter Paul Gauguin. Half the film takes place in Paris where he quits a lucrative job as a stock broker and becomes a painter. The other half is in French Polynesia where he paints the people and places that surround him. He has conflicts with his wife over quitting his job and his painting, he has conflicts with the local priest in Tahiti about the destruction of tikis (false idols) on the island.

I would not buy a copy of it, but it is worth a rental if you like movies about paradise. From what I know about him it is pretty close to the facts too.



 
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King Bushwich the 33rd
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 10, 2005
Posts: 1161
From: Ling Cod Beach, CA 90803
Posted: 2009-03-24 09:16 am   Permalink

Another movie about him.
A 1980 made for TV movie with David Carradine as Gauguin

Gauguin the Savage

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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11104
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2009-03-24 11:12 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2009-03-18 21:57, Zeta wrote:
I guess this is where he was buried...

before they moved him to his museum so thousands of tourists can visit his tomb...



This is confusing to me. I don't believe his remains were ever moved, but where is that tombstone from?

Here is another shot I took of his grave at the Altuona Cemetery, on a hilltop on the Marquesan island of Hiva Oa:



The statue on the grave is a replica of his ceramic sculpture called "Oviri":



Here is a reference to why it is on his grave, (quoting him before he decided to leave Tahiti):



Though he sometimes gave his human subjects Tiki-esque facial features...


(Tahitian Idol -Hina, woodcut, 1895)

...he was definitely more obsessed with the female form, as can be seen in his most famous wood carvings, the door boards to his studio on Hiva Oa, which he called his "House of Pleasure":




"Be mysterious..."


"Soyez amoureuses et vous serez heureuses" which can be tranlated into:
"Be in love and you will be happy".

Here is their complete set up:


Here is a sketch of his home on Hiva Oa, the studio was upstairs:



[ This Message was edited by: bigbrotiki 2009-03-24 13:25 ]


 
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Pacific Andy
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Feb 17, 2003
Posts: 193
From: Tahiti
Posted: 2009-03-24 12:55 pm   Permalink

There is always been a rumour in Tahiti in the town of Punaaia where he lived that when he left for the Marques Islands he left so much debt that the local ransacked his little house. Someone took the door where he painted a mural of the beach in Punaaia. The rumour is that someone on the island of Moorea has that door. Can you imagine how much it would be worth?

 
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Zeta
Grand Member (2 years)  

Joined: Feb 13, 2007
Posts: 2049
From: Atlantis/Basque Country/Spain/Mexico
Posted: 2009-03-27 11:02 am   Permalink

Nice post Bigbro!

Quote:

On 2009-03-24 12:55, Pacific Andy wrote:
There is always been a rumour in Tahiti in the town of Punaaia where he lived that when he left for the Marques Islands he left so much debt that the local ransacked his little house. Someone took the door where he painted a mural of the beach in Punaaia. The rumour is that someone on the island of Moorea has that door. Can you imagine how much it would be worth?



In the prologue of a recent edition of NOA NOA the person who wrote the prologue tells the story of how he goes to where Gauguin's house door was and bought it from a local... So probably, the door is in some museum or collection somewhere, not in the wild... It is funny and poetic... He left that house broke and in debt and eventually someone took the door and sold it for a lot of pesos...

The damned Gauguin Tiki


 
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Tiki Duddy
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 04, 2006
Posts: 759
From: Manitoba, Canada
Posted: 2009-03-28 06:46 am   Permalink

Thanks for the InfoLoad, Zeta!
i was actually looking into this guy's life for one of my school projects a little while ago
very cool


 
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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11104
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2009-03-28 3:27 pm   Permalink

Here is the reproduction of Paul Gauguin's studio on Hiva Oao:



And here is the VIEW from his grave:



Both from this great website:

http://www.galenfrysinger.com/hiva_oa_marquesas.htm

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Zeta
Grand Member (2 years)  

Joined: Feb 13, 2007
Posts: 2049
From: Atlantis/Basque Country/Spain/Mexico
Posted: 2009-03-28 11:11 pm   Permalink

Cool Bigbro!


Old Spanish book


 
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Zeta
Grand Member (2 years)  

Joined: Feb 13, 2007
Posts: 2049
From: Atlantis/Basque Country/Spain/Mexico
Posted: 2009-04-01 5:47 pm   Permalink




 
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Zeta
Grand Member (2 years)  

Joined: Feb 13, 2007
Posts: 2049
From: Atlantis/Basque Country/Spain/Mexico
Posted: 2009-04-07 12:26 pm   Permalink

Vintage Postcard

The Gauguin Tiki again...


 
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Zeta
Grand Member (2 years)  

Joined: Feb 13, 2007
Posts: 2049
From: Atlantis/Basque Country/Spain/Mexico
Posted: 2009-04-08 08:48 am   Permalink

Guess who...


 
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Zeta
Grand Member (2 years)  

Joined: Feb 13, 2007
Posts: 2049
From: Atlantis/Basque Country/Spain/Mexico
Posted: 2009-04-14 10:53 am   Permalink


Rare Gauguin with a Tiki...


 
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Haole Jim
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 17, 2009
Posts: 413
From: central coast metro Chicago
Posted: 2009-07-20 11:06 pm   Permalink

Incredibly cool, thank you.

There are a number of Gauguin originals in the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago, on the central coast (the Great Lakes).


 
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Zeta
Grand Member (2 years)  

Joined: Feb 13, 2007
Posts: 2049
From: Atlantis/Basque Country/Spain/Mexico
Posted: 2010-01-21 4:38 pm   Permalink

Aloha everyone!

Interesting article mentions the "Gauguin Room" From 1964 to 1969 in N.Y.C.

From "Some NYC Tiki History" thread posted by leisure master:
http://www.tikiroom.com/tikicentral/bb/viewtopic.php?topic=35254&forum=1&1

From the New York Times

January 20, 2010, 4:34 pm
The Way We Ate: Too Old to Tiki?
By MICHELE HUMES
Eddie Hausner/The New York Times Trader Vic’s at the Plaza in 1989. The drinks earned praise from Craig Claiborne for their “unrivalled potency.”

In 1994, Ruth Reichl announced that New York had outgrown tiki bars. Her review of Gauguin, a French-Polynesian fusion palace that briefly occupied the basement of the Plaza Hotel, ended on the image of two exiting customers: a delighted child and her somber father. He was somber, perhaps, because he had had to foot the bill in a restaurant that paid rent to Donald Trump. More important, he was too old to believe in “silly drinks and fake palms.”

Yet, for most of its history, tiki culture has been a singularly grown-up pursuit. After all, those “silly drinks”—providing you can find the straw through the thicket of fruit salad and plastic effigies—offer what Craig Claiborne called “unrivalled potency.” And the pineapple-happy fare that typically accompanies it was once capable of earning three stars from The New York Times.

That three-star tiki bar was named the Gauguin Room. From 1964 to 1969, in the ninth-floor penthouse of the now-defunct Gallery of Modern Art (the building at 2 Columbus Circle that now houses the Museum of Art and Design), it served liberally interpreted Polynesian to a Park Avenue crowd. The menu was an anthropological marvel of arbitrary Tahitian references and nonsense pidgin—“Papeete” referred to Cornish game hen, and a chow mein dish was sold as “Pork Ding Dong”—but apparently it all tasted good, and the cocktails were enormous. Nobody really thought it was authentic, least of all Craig Claiborne, who described the food as a pan-Asian fantasy. He gave it a glowing review anyway.

The Gauguin that Ruth Reichl reviewed thirty years later was, in many ways, the same restaurant—but times had changed. In 1964, Hawaii had recently achieved statehood, “Gilligan’s Island” was in its first season, and, in the name of Polynesian cookery, canned pineapple was infiltrating everything from cheese sandwiches to meatballs. In 1994, a year notable for Ms. Reichl’s multi-starred reviews of a Chinatown noodle house and no-frills sushi bar, New Yorkers no longer wanted to be condescended to with pastiche. The kitchen’s fusion acrobatics— foie gras rumaki, Yang Chow couscous, and fruit sushi with marzipan “wasabi,”—fell flat, and the island exotica that had spelled tropical adventure to a generation of diners not yet accustomed to air travel now recalled a school gym decked out for luau prom.

This year, two forthcoming neo-Polynesian ventures—Hurricane Club, which will open in the Park Avenue location once occupied by Porçao, and Painkiller, from the team behind Dutch Kills in Long Island City—are banking on the return of our lost innocence, or at least a willingness to suspend disbelief. The rum will certainly go a long way, and economic uncertainty may do the rest. Tough times have a way of calling for comfort food and uncomplicated fun.

Should you doubt the consoling power of the tiki bar, consider the case of kidnapped heiress Patty Hearst. When she was reunited with her family after her ordeal at the hands of the Symbionese Liberation Army, the first thing she asked for was a mai tai.




_________________
¡Viva Tiki! Ambassador of Tiki in Mexico. Zeta is specialized in the research, study and preservation of Tiki culture in Latin countries.


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Zeta
Grand Member (2 years)  

Joined: Feb 13, 2007
Posts: 2049
From: Atlantis/Basque Country/Spain/Mexico
Posted: 2010-01-23 04:36 am   Permalink

From the "Port Aventura Barcelona Spain" thread:
Quote:

On 2010-01-23 04:33, Zeta wrote:
· MERS DU SUD:

En Mers du Sud podrás comprar artículos autóctonos hechos por los indígenas de Polynesia, como collares, piezas de madera, ropa, esculturas, etc. In Mers du Sud you can purchase items made by indigenous native of Polynesia, as necklaces, woodwork, clothing, sculptures, etc.. El interior de la tienda, así como el cartel de la entrada, está inspirado con las pinturas de Gauguin. The interior of the store and the lineup of entry, is inspired by the paintings of Gauguin.



_________________
¡Viva Tiki! Ambassador of Tiki in Mexico. Zeta is specialized in the research, study and preservation of Tiki culture in Latin countries.


 
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