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Tiki Central Forums » » Tiki Music » » Sven's The SOUND of TIKI CD -preview and discussion
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Sven's The SOUND of TIKI CD -preview and discussion
bigtikidude
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 10, 2004
Posts: 8863
From: Anaheim,Ca.
Posted: 2009-11-05 4:43 pm   Permalink

I would like to see the Mad Moutain Rumblers just as much as the Astronauts.




 
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Tiki Shaker
Grand Member (6 years)  

Joined: Jun 28, 2008
Posts: 706
From: Menifee, CA
Posted: 2009-11-06 10:30 pm   Permalink

After reading this thread, and because I'm too young to have experienced tiki in its Hey Day, I have a question:

Did restaurants play music back in the day? Sure, I know some had live shows.. but were the eating establishments equipped with speakers so that music could be piped in? Also... what about tiki bars? Did the average tiki bar have a juke box in it? I don't recall seeing juke boxes in any of the interior shots of tiki bar/restaurant post cards I have.

I've never thought of this before, but is tiki music basically whatever people played at home in their tiki bar basements and backyard luaus?



[ This Message was edited by: Tiki Shaker 2009-11-07 09:42 ]


 
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Kawentzmann
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 28, 2002
Posts: 254
From: Berlin, Germany
Posted: 2009-11-07 01:58 am   Permalink

I don’t know. But I guess guys had transistor radios in their Tiki-fied beachshacks.

 
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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11126
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2009-11-08 08:01 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2009-11-06 22:30, Tiki Shaker wrote:
Did restaurants play music back in the day? Sure, I know some had live shows.. but were the eating establishments equipped with speakers so that music could be piped in?
I've never thought of this before, but is tiki music basically whatever people played at home in their tiki bar basements and backyard luaus?



Very good point. We already know that live Exotica music, though the perfect supporting soundtrack to the Polynesian restaurant experience, was not performed regularly in mainland Tiki temples. Sure, Arthur Lyman played live at the Bali Hai and Lattitude 20, but if you look at the long list of mainland venues that Martin Denny performed at, you will find but a few outright Polynesian clubs.

But when did RECORDED music make its debut in the food and drink industry? It's hard to imagine that restaurateurs did not make use of the piped in "Muzak" concept in Tiki times, it having been established in 1936:
"The first actual delivery of Muzak to commercial customers took place in New York City in 1936. At this time the technology involved remained rather crude as the music originated from record players manually operated at a central office location..."

Even president Eisenhower, in office from 1953 to 1961 (the Tiki period president!), made use of it:
"President Dwight D. Eisenhower was the first to pump Muzak into the West Wing."

I have seen 1940s Hapa Haole records with a Don The Beachcomber label on them, I am assuming they were not only sold in the gift shop -all the restaurateur needed was a record player and some speakers. Hawaiian music was the very EARLIEST form of Polynesian pop that got imported to the mainland, from the early 1900s on, through live performers, records, and sheet music, it helped to inspire the first bamboo hideaways!

This is one of those things that were just assumed to always have been there, but there is no certainty of WHEN exactly the initial event occurred. So we need to talk to some veterans pronto to see if they remember IF and WHEN they heard exotic music in a Tiki restaurant first --and I am sure THEY will have a hard time pinning it down.

And then, more specifically, was it ever Exotica that got played? I think the answer to Tiki Shaker's second question ("I've never thought of this before, but is tiki music basically whatever people played at home in their tiki bar basements and backyard luaus?") is a YES:
Exotica music was the parallel contemporary of the Tiki Lounge, meaning that the generation that frequented Polynesian supper clubs were the same people that had Marty, Arty, and Les in their record cabinet. And they certainly must have played them in their rumpus rooms.

My compilation is entitled "The Sound of TIKI" (as in "The Spirit of Tiki"), not "The Sound of the Tiki Restaurant". But my very aim is to connect the Polynesian pop of the Tiki Lounge with the Polynesian pop of Exotica, by pointing out all the parallels in their themes and concepts.

To avoid the historical shaky ground of Tiki restaurant music, I formulated it like this in my liner notes:

>>Polynesian supper clubs used a variety of musical styles to support the escapist atmosphere of their establishments, but vinyl archaeologists have since discovered and defined the musical category of “Exotica” as the perfect complementary soundscape to the layered environs of a Tiki bar.<<


 
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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11126
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2009-11-08 08:30 am   Permalink

This is a good point at which I want to inquire about a certain Martin Denny venue:

The Tiki Restaurant at the Villa Plaza, Washington? (state, I assume). Its number was JU. 8-2101

That is all the information I have. Has anybody seen anything, any paper ephemera from this place?


 
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Jeff Central
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 23, 2002
Posts: 1578
From: Columbus, Ohio
Posted: 2009-11-08 08:45 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2009-11-08 08:30, bigbrotiki wrote:
This is a good point at which I want to inquire about a certain Martin Denny venue:

The Tiki Restaurant at the Villa Plaza, Washington? (state, I assume). Its number was JU. 8-2101

That is all the information I have. Has anybody seen anything, any paper ephemera from this place?



There was a poster on eBay many moonsago advertising Martin Denny's appearance at the Tiki Restaurant. Unfortunately, I was outbid at the time. I have a lo res pic from the auction somewhere.

I do remember the Kahiki playing Hapa Haole and Exotica music from as far back as the mid-eighties. Plus they had the Kahiki Trio which played a mix of Exotica and top tunes of the day from 1961 until 1978.

The not only pumped in music but they had a sound system set up strictly for sound effects for the thunderstorm room and other areas.

Nice discussion guys!!

Cheers and Mahalo,
Jeff


 
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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11126
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2009-11-08 10:27 am   Permalink

Jeff, good memory. Luckily, that very poster was won by a local collector (no, not Kohalacharms) and I have had the privilege to photograph it for the my booklet. But it's really hard to find out anything about a place as generic as "The Tiki Restaurant" with the only location named being Villa Plaza, and that phone number --plus the printer's signature: Washington Poster Co

 
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tikiyaki
Grand Member (7 years)  

Joined: May 18, 2004
Posts: 2706
From: The Exotic Port of REDONDO BEACH, CA
Posted: 2009-11-08 11:25 am   Permalink

Sven...Here is the ad for Alex Kaeck (misspelled on the ad) at the China Trader in Toluca Lake...if you don't have his "Surfer's Paradise" record, you're missing out.




a few more live music ads...











_________________
http://www.tikiyakiorchestra.com


 
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Tiki Shaker
Grand Member (6 years)  

Joined: Jun 28, 2008
Posts: 706
From: Menifee, CA
Posted: 2009-11-08 11:57 am   Permalink

All of this is a funny thing to think about. I mean, ever since movies/tv have been around, I would think a lot of people (including myself), think of the past not only in the visual sense, but also with each era/style/group/fad having its own soundtrack. Over the last century especially, a lot of the styles/fads/eras were either equally influenced by music as much as visual elements, or music was the most important influence. Tiki, to me, seems to be one of the few recent styles/eras where the visuals were the dominating force. (or was it the alcohol?)

 
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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11126
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2009-11-08 8:07 pm   Permalink

I wouldn't say it did not have its own musical style, it just wasn't music-DRIVEN, primarily. Since the Tiki period came and went so fast it might not have had the time to develop further, but Denny and Lyman were clearly its contemporaries, paralleling Tiki's rise and fall: 1957 - mid-60s, when the Beatles made them look old.

And let's not forget that Tiki had a large part of Polynesian pop inherent in it, and Polynesian pop DID get jump-started by the Hawaiian music craze. AND Hawaiian statehood then coincided with the big success of Marty and Arty, so "that modern music from Hawaii" did help inspire the spirit of Tiki on the mainland, no doubt, even if it did not get played in Tiki bars on a regular basis.


 
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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11126
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2009-11-08 8:43 pm   Permalink

One more thing, talking about style periods and pop culture trends in the 20th Century:

Does anybody else concur with me that dividing the century in terms of 40s, 50s and 60s as style decades does not really fit the bill? Looking back, beginning with Tiki: Tiki wasn't a 50s thing, it wasn't a 60s thing, the decade of its style lay between 1955 and 1965. If I look at fashion and car styling for example, their look was more similar between 1945 to 1955, than "in the 40s" , or "in the 50s". That might have to do with WW2, but it seems to me that even before, the ten years from 1925 to '35, and from 1935 to '45 had more one coherent look than the actual beginning and end of a decade. The same goes for 1965 to 1975. ???


 
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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11126
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2009-11-08 8:48 pm   Permalink

Oh, and by the way, Jim, that's a nice collection of Polynesian live act ads. Do other Exotica collectors have any? Jeff?
And Jim, can you perhaps cut me a CD of "Surfer's Paradise"?


 
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aquarj
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Apr 02, 2002
Posts: 1076
From: SF bay area, CA
Posted: 2009-11-08 9:32 pm   Permalink

I posted a download of the Alex Keack Surfers Paradise LP about 5 years ago on this thread. Moving at my usual breakneck pace of keeping web stuff cool and current, I haven't actually moved that in the 5 years since, other than putting it in a different folder (this one). Here's the cover again:



Totally agree about the inadequacy of rough decade boundaries for describing pop culture trends, btw. I think the actual decade of the 60s had even more than two discernible periods though - 65 was different from 62, and also very different from 69.

-Randy


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tikiyaki
Grand Member (7 years)  

Joined: May 18, 2004
Posts: 2706
From: The Exotic Port of REDONDO BEACH, CA
Posted: 2009-11-08 9:59 pm   Permalink

You know , there is a Digital only release of this record from the actual master, not an lp burn. It's available on iTunes.

Oddly enough, it's under the name "Mike Adams and the red jackets" - It's actually a double release of the Mike Adams record AND the Alex Keack album, but the company didn't use Alex Keack in the name of the digital re-release. So tracks 1-10 are Mike Adams and the Red Jackets, and 11-20 are Alex Keack

The quality is AMAZING, and way better than the burned from the lp copy I'd been listening to, which was also, by the way in mono.

This version is in super clean stereo, and the record is just stellar. you get both records as one digital only album for $9.99 on iTunes.

Sven I can burn a CD if you like, but for $10,, it's worth the download.

Definitely one of my favorite exotica albums.

BTW, I got those ads from Arkiva Tropika and Critiki.

I've been wanting to cover "Polynesian Hayride" from the record since I started the Orchestra....great tune.

I also agree with the assessment of the eras....I always refer to the golden age of tiki as "late 50's, early 60's" when I describe my band to people, but really our deal reaches into late 60's Herb Alpert territory as well.





[ This Message was edited by: tikiyaki 2009-11-08 22:15 ]


 
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aquarj
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Apr 02, 2002
Posts: 1076
From: SF bay area, CA
Posted: 2009-11-08 10:18 pm   Permalink

Oh, looking back at old shared songs, I just noticed I had some other songs up that are relevant to this thread...

Here is the Astronauts version of Quiet Village that's been mentioned a few times.

And here is a cover of Adventures in Paradise by the Playboys - an Aussie instro band that isn't the Atlantics.

Here is a nice version of Bermuda by Merrell Fankhauser and the Impacts. Actually it's on other threads that Fankhauser comes up as an example of highly questionable taste in modern times with the "We Love Tikis" video. BUT he did have some good stuff with the Impacts in the last decade or so (like this version of Bermuda), and of course more so in the 60s with the original Impacts.

Not sure if this derails the thread, but anyway hope these are of interest to someone.

Thanks tikiyaki for the info about the digital copy from master on itunes.

-Randy


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