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Tiki Central Forums » » General Tiki » » The Jungle-style Thread - Pop Culture Iconography of the Dark Continent
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The Jungle-style Thread - Pop Culture Iconography of the Dark Continent
Mister Naufrago
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 20, 2008
Posts: 214
From: Spain
Posted: 2010-01-05 12:58 pm   Permalink

Not a single mention to mugs in this long thread?
What´s happening to us?
Some Jungle Style mug from Spain.






Here´s one for Zeta. Old Spanish design and Miguel Covarrubias drawing
Amazing psychic connection between two artist from two countries?





 
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Dustycajun
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Nov 16, 2007
Posts: 4248
From: Santa Barbara, CA
Posted: 2010-01-05 6:06 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2010-01-01 18:33, Sabu The Coconut Boy wrote:
The Wild Animal Park in San Diego definitely had a Safari theme when it opened.

Check out this great image of the Nairobi Village entrance:




Sabu,

Cool building. Here is a card I have showing the Congo River Fishing Camp.



DC


 
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JOHN-O
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 16, 2008
Posts: 2684
From: Dogtown, USA
Posted: 2010-01-06 08:36 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2010-01-05 12:58, Mister Naufrago wrote:

Here´s one for Zeta. Old Spanish design and Miguel Covarrubias drawing
Amazing psychic connection between two artist from two countries?





Mister Naufrago,

Another interesting contribution to this thread. Thank you !!

What exactly is that thing on the left supposed to be?

Also where do the Spanish items (Tikis, mugs, etc) that you post originate from? Are they made in Europe?



 
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Mister Naufrago
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 20, 2008
Posts: 214
From: Spain
Posted: 2010-01-06 10:58 am   Permalink

Quote:

Mister Naufrago,

Another interesting contribution to this thread. Thank you !!

What exactly is that thing on the left supposed to be?

Also where do the Spanish items (Tikis, mugs, etc) that you post originate from? Are they made in Europe?






Gracias JOHN-O
"The thing" is a mug.
I previously posted a image of that mug (minus lid) on this thread.
That picture was taken in its natural environment, the jungle/tiki themed bar in Andalucia. Unfortunately the place is now closed.




The second image its the rendition of the same mug from an old menu.



It was used for a cocktail named something like "Mother-in-law Killer"
"A dreamy labyrinth of rum, juices and subtle spices from tropical paradises"
You are right. All these artifacts made in Spain and are from my collection.




 
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JOHN-O
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 16, 2008
Posts: 2684
From: Dogtown, USA
Posted: 2010-01-06 11:26 am   Permalink

Mister Naufrago,

I just went back to your original images on page 3.

Are all of these things considered "Tiki" in Spain or do these African Pop Primitive items go by another name?

Also I just discovered this thread:

http://www.tikiroom.com/tikicentral/bb/viewtopic.php?mode=viewtopic&topic=27562&forum=16&start=0

Amazing stuff !! Maybe Spaniards appreciate Tiki more than Americans do. (Just like the way the French love Jazz music).

[ This Message was edited by: JOHN-O 2010-01-06 16:09 ]


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8FT Tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Nov 30, 2003
Posts: 1222
From: Kansas City, MO
Posted: 2010-01-06 2:32 pm   Permalink

John-o, I hope these photos are alright to add to your thread.
These are just things from all around the house. None of them was purchased for a theme (like we do with tiki) they are simply things we like and have found over the years.

Native and hut s&p set


Ceramic jungle critters. The gorilla is a salt shaker, the crocodile and hippo are vintage aquarium bubblers whose mouths open and close as the air flows to them.


Coconut souvenir native couple

Ceramic native figurines


Silly statuette



All metal vintage native bust uplight.

Native dancers wall plaques. Chalk figurines on metal shields.

I live in a world of tchotchkes.


_________________
I once was lost.....but now I'm found.....


 
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JOHN-O
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 16, 2008
Posts: 2684
From: Dogtown, USA
Posted: 2010-01-06 4:17 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2010-01-06 14:32, 8FT Tiki wrote:
John-o, I hope these photos are alright to add to your thread


It's cool 8FT, I think we needed a ceramic hippo here on TC.

Plus that coconut girl has a nice rack.


 
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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11104
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2010-01-06 4:39 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2010-01-06 11:26, JOHN-O wrote:
Are all of these things considered "Tiki" in Spain or do these African Pop Primitive items go by another name?



No, because they were made for, and were used in what we now (in retrospect) refer to as Tiki Bars.
I believe when it comes to finding an overall name for African/PNG/Polynesian objects (those are the cultures that inspired Spanish ceramics), a fitting term would be "Pop primitivism":

>>This is a book about the fascination with Primitive Art; more specifically, it is about the genre of Pop Primitivism in the 20th Century, the under-appreciated stepchild of the intense Primitive Art interest of that period. As in any pop culture, stereotypes and simplifications abound, displaying a naiveté that could be likened to a primitive view of “primitive” cultures.<<

(Opening text of Tiki Modern)

Zeta opened a thread about that here:
http://www.tikiroom.com/tikicentral/bb/viewtopic.php?mode=viewtopic&topic=31441&forum=1&start=0

The thread stayed too much on a solely Pre-Columbian note, but basically ALL that was considered "primitive art" in the 20th Century (which very much includes African and Oceanic art) can fit under that general moniker, and then can be differentiated as "African pop primitivism", "Pre Columbian pop primitivism", and so on.

Also, another unifying concept under which all these items from different cultures can be grouped is being from "the Tropics", but the adjective "tropical" carries too many Margarita Bar connotations for me.


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JOHN-O
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 16, 2008
Posts: 2684
From: Dogtown, USA
Posted: 2010-01-06 8:35 pm   Permalink

BigBro,

Is "Pop Primitivism" a term that you coined like "Tiki-style" and "Polynesian Pop"?

I did a search on "Pop Primitivism" and "Mayan Revival" to see what other interesting web sites I could find. The closest match brought me back to Tiki Central.

[ This Message was edited by: JOHN-O 2010-01-06 20:36 ]


 
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JOHN-O
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 16, 2008
Posts: 2684
From: Dogtown, USA
Posted: 2010-01-06 9:07 pm   Permalink

OK, let's go back to TV Land for a while. During the days of the 1960's Black Power movement, there were 3 TV shows that featured African locales. Native Africans were portrayed more respectfully without the "Ooga Booga" of past. The bad guys were now evil WHITE poachers.

1. Daktari (1966-1969) - This show followed the work of Dr. Tracy, his daughter, and staff at an Animal Behavior Study Center in East Africa. Co-stars were Clarence the Cross-Eyed Lion and Judy the Chimp. The interesting thing was that a lot of the show was filmed at a place called "Africa USA" in Soledad Canyon just north of Los Angeles. This was a 600-acre animal training compound created in 1962. It all ended in 1969 when major flooding and mudslides destroyed the place.

Daktari had a pretty groovy opening score, it would have played well in a Tiki bar.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxdxk0RpBQg

2. Tarzan (1966-1968) - Ron Ely played a Tarzan who was pretty articulate. None of this "Me Tarzan, You Jane" stuff. Actually there was no Jane in this TV series. Too bad Raquel Welch's film career took off that year. Her Jane would have raised this seldom remembered TV show to cult status. Don't believe me? Please refer to "One Million Years B.C."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-syuAm5YOzE

3. Cowboy in Africa (1967-1968) - Chuck Conners is transported in an episode of the "Time Tunnel" from his 1880's-set "The Rifleman" TV show to late 1960's Africa. (OK, I made that up but I think my idea would have lasted more than 1 season.)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N7jnLeo3hnQ


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MadDogMike
Grand Member (6 years)  

Joined: Mar 30, 2008
Posts: 7257
From: The Anvil of the Sun
Posted: 2010-01-06 9:21 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2010-01-06 20:35, JOHN-O wrote:
I did a search on..."Mayan Revival"...closest match brought me back to Tiki Central.



Tiki Central is such an amazing and unrivaled resource. I am working on a little Mayan inspired art project and there is no "Mayan Central" resource like TC

Thank you guys for the work you do that makes this such a great place. (Sorry, a little off-topic )


 
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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11104
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2010-01-06 9:59 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2010-01-06 20:35, JOHN-O wrote:
BigBro,

Is "Pop Primitivism" a term that you coined like "Tiki-style" and "Polynesian Pop"?

I did a search on "Pop Primitivism" and "Mayan Revival" to see what other interesting web sites I could find. The closest match brought me back to Tiki Central.




I think so. It seems like a good opposite to modernism, with which it forms a symbiotic relationship. The term "primitivism" alone has been applied for many varied subjects already, in art, literature, philosophy, but nobody has dealt with its POPULAR, less intellectual perception and application in everyday items so far.

The most influential book in terms of HIGH art for me was William Rubin's "Primitivism" in 20th Century Art", published in conjunction with the exhibition he curated at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1984:

http://www.amazon.com/Primitivism-20th-Century-Art-Affinity/dp/0870705180/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1262842289&sr=8-1

This was the first major book on the subject since Robert Goldwater's groundbreaking work "Primitivism in Modern Art " in 1966. The important difference was (for me, and others) that the Rubin book was all visuals, making the simple visual primitive/modern comparisons I am so fond of. Of course, like any influential idea, it received a lot of flack from culture critics:


>>Article: Primitivism Revisited: After the End of an Idea

In 1984 William Rubin, art historian, curator, and director of the Museum of Modern Art's department of painting and sculpture, organized "Primitivism in 20th Century Art: Affinity of the Tribal and the Modern" in New York. The exhibition traced the formal relationships between Western art and African, Pre-Columbian, Native American, and Oceanic art. The show was highly controversial and received solid criticism from the art community, in particular African art historians, for applying a notion of "primitivism" to non-Western art--evident in ...<<

...and this:

>>The prevailing viewpoint is made all too clear in one of the "affinities" featured on the catalogue covers, a juxtaposition of Picasso's Girl before a Mirror ... with a Kwakiutl half-mask, a type quite rare among Northwest coast creations. Its task here is simply to produce an effect of resemblance (an effect actually created by the camera angle). In this exhibition a universal message, "Affinity of the Tribal and the Modern," is produced by careful selection and maintenance of a specific angle of vision. (1)

A 100-year-old legacy of curatorial colonialism has produced profound disorganizations of unique knowledge systems...<<

...the last sentence admonishing the same thing I am guilty of: Creating a reality which is so strongly supported by visual research that it has an impact BEYOND intellectual perception, and is thus hard to counter-argue.


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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11104
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2010-01-06 10:15 pm   Permalink

However, I can take no credit for the term "Mayan Revival Style", which was introduced by this wonderful little 1984 book:

http://www.amazon.com/Mayan-Revival-Style-Deco-Fantasy/dp/0826311431/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1262844135&sr=1-1

.. the cover of which shows the Mayan Theater in downtown L.A. --which I photographed for Tiki Modern 20 years later.

Then there is

http://www.amazon.com/Pre-Columbian-Art-Post-Columbian-World-American/dp/0810929473/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1262844640&sr=1-1

And the definitive book on my favorite 1920s architect/explorer, Robert Stacy-Judd:

http://www.amazon.com/Robert-Stacy-Judd-Architecture-Creation-Style/dp/0884963519/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1262844768&sr=1-1


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Atomic Tiki Punk
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 19, 2009
Posts: 5886
From: Costa Misery
Posted: 2010-01-07 02:27 am   Permalink

I remember that a very elderly "Clarence the cross eyed Lion" was at lion country safari, Calif. when they first opened in Irvine.

 
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MadDogMike
Grand Member (6 years)  

Joined: Mar 30, 2008
Posts: 7257
From: The Anvil of the Sun
Posted: 2010-01-07 08:20 am   Permalink

Didn't I read that "Elderly" Cross-eyed Clarence sired many cubs in his tenure at LCS? Maybe he wasn't so elderly after all.

EDIT - Sorry, wrong disabled lion - "Lion Country Safari was given a big boost by an unlikely star attraction. An elderly, nearly toothless lion named Frasier came from a Mexican circus in February 1971. The old cat’s tongue dangled from one side of his mouth, and he had trouble walking. He may not have been much to look at as far as we humans were concerned, but the lionesses saw him differently. There was population boom of lion cubs at the park. Frasier’s sorry visage adorned tee-shirts and other park souvenirs. Frasier sired 35 cubs until his death in June 1972 at 17-20 years of age, equivalent to a human age of 85-100 years. Frasier even inspired a 1973 feature movie, Frasier the Sensuous Lion, rated PG."



[ This Message was edited by: MadDogMike 2010-01-07 08:21 ]


 
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