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Tiki Food Recipes
GentleHangman
Grand Member (7 years)  

Joined: Jun 23, 2006
Posts: 464
From: Stuart, Florida
Posted: 2011-12-07 08:27 am   Permalink

Rumaki has always been a favorite of mine going all the way back to the mid 1960's when I was literally living out of my paperback copy of "The James Beard Cookbook"(First Edition-circa 1959). I modified one of his recipes (I think it was for chicken hearts) and used it to make Rumaki using either chicken livers or chunks of chicken tenderloin.

RUMAKI a la BEARD:

Equal parts:
Olive Oil
Dry Sherry
Soy Sauce

Add any or all the seasonings below to the mixture:
Garlic powder, dry mustard & curry powder to taste.

Chicken livers halved or chicken tenderloin cut up
Bacon partially cooked (NOT CRISP - just nice and soft)and cut in half cross-wise

Water chestnuts halved.

Marinate the meat for 3 to 4 hours (Not the Bacon)

Wrap a piece of liver or chicken around a water chestnut half, wrap with bacon strip and secure
with a wooden toothpick.

Broil for 2-3 minutes per side.

I began making these in 1966 with this recipe and still do to this day.


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[ This Message was edited by: gentlehangman 2011-12-18 13:11 ]

[ This Message was edited by: gentlehangman 2011-12-19 11:05 ]


 
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jokeiii
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Joined: Sep 18, 2010
Posts: 359
From: Miami
Posted: 2011-12-17 5:36 pm   Permalink

In one impossibly retro-chic place I dimly remember rumaki made with foie gras bits. Ridiculously good.

Carry on.
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Professor G
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Joined: Sep 03, 2011
Posts: 335
From: the Tiki Wastelands
Posted: 2011-12-17 9:42 pm   Permalink

That's tougher than it sounds, Joke, and the cook's skills must have been formidable: overheat foie gras and it just flat melts away. I believe I read that Donn Beach did use duck livers in his rumaki on some occasions. My one highly personal reservation is that I'm not sure you need to make rumaki out of anything generally considered desirable. I may not be the best judge; I can do retro and I'm superb at faux, but I'm a long, long way from chic.

By the way, Gentle Hangman, I'm intrigued by the curry flavor in your take on rumaki. I may try a curry aioli instead of the sri racha next time.

[ This Message was edited by: Professor G 2011-12-17 21:43 ]


 
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jokeiii
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Joined: Sep 18, 2010
Posts: 359
From: Miami
Posted: 2011-12-18 02:23 am   Permalink

If I had to deconstruct foie gras rumaki, I'd guess a) they used the scraps, b) semi-froze the scraps and c) started with somewhat precooked bacon.

That said, I think using curry powder would be far tougher! (almost invariably curry winds up tasting very, very dusty...unless you make your own, fresh)

Lastly, I have seen a few times a sort of angels-on-horseback/rumaki hybrid, chicken livers not being the easiest thing to find around here.
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Professor G
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Joined: Sep 03, 2011
Posts: 335
From: the Tiki Wastelands
Posted: 2011-12-24 3:05 pm   Permalink

After working on Rumaki, the ultimate PolyPop Luau starter, I thought I’d switch gears and do some experiments on what should be the official brunch dish for the Big Tiki Morning After. Chow Dun was one of the first items I noticed on a ‘60‘s Don the Beachcomber’s menu. I don't find a mention of it in any of my old Chinese/Cantonese cookbooks or on any of the reputable-ish websites I glanced at. The Beachbum has a Chow Dun recipe in Taboo Table, but, unusually, no anecdotes about its development. In case you’ve not read it, you may define Chow Dun thusly: scrambled eggs with stuff in them.

I’ve searched in current Chinese cookbooks and some contemporary to the Beachcomber and I’ve looked online, but I can’t find Chow Dun; what I do find is Chow Fun, a wide noodle dish that often contains scrambled eggs. Could it be that that’s where the dish arose? The theory is plausible because, while the symbols for items are generally consistent among Chinese dialects, the pronunciation of those words can vary wildly; Donn Beach may have just seen a dish, heard a word and run with it from there. If, as seems likely, I’m completely wrong, I’d love to know the real story. It beats me (like a scrambled egg) but maybe Chow Fun was in some way a starting point.

Chow Dun, however, is my starting point. It’s a bit like a soft scramble version of Egg Fu Yung, but better because it doesn’t have the chewy egg-jerky hide that you have to flay from of nine out of ten E.F.Y. I do like the sauce element of Egg Fu Yung, though, so I’m going to honor its Cantonese/Indonesian roots with a Fish Sauce Gravy.



The Don the Beachcomber Chow Dun recipe calls for green peas, but you will not catch me using those disgusting little green sacks of mush (Yes, I’ve had fresh and fresh frozen and they’re slightly less gross, I’ll grant you, but still very, very nasty.). The menu gives shrimp, pork and chicken options, the first two of which would be delicious, but I want something a bit more brunch-y. What I’m going to do is start with a recipe for Crabmeat Stirred Eggs (scrambled eggs with stuff in them) from Gloria Bley Miller’s 1966 1000 Recipe Chinese Cookbook, then add a few texture elements and the Fish Sauce Gravy. I use a fast shrimp stock in the gravy which I make by simmering shrimp shells from a pound or more of shrimp, and a little bit of onion, carrot and celery in enough water to cover the solids for about twenty minutes before straining. I make it any time I have shrimp around (it’ll freeze for storage). If you don’t choose to do that, use delicious tap water and double up on the fish sauce.

Stirred Eggs w/ Crabmeat
1 Tbsp vegetable oil
2 green onions, sliced thin
8 oz. crabmeat, picked
4 oz. water chestnuts, rinsed and slivered
1 tsp sesame oil
4-6 eggs, beaten with 1 Tbsp water
1/2 tsp salt

Heat oil on medium. Stir-fry green onions, water chestnuts and crabmeat for two minutes. Remove the crab mixture from the skillet.

Add the sesame oil, eggs and salt. As the first layer sets, draw it toward the center of the pan. Fold the crab mixture into the eggs, reserving some lumps to display on top of the dish, stirring until you have a soft scramble.

Serve immediately with steamed rice (if you wish) and Fish Sauce Gravy.

Fish Sauce Gravy
2 Tbsp Vegetable Oil
2 Tbsp Garlic, minced
2 Tbsp Shallots, minced
t.t. Thai Chili, minced
2 stalks fresh Lemongrass, cut into 2’’ lengths and smashed
1 tsp Madras Curry Powder
2 Cups Fast Shrimp Stock
1 Tbsp Fish Sauce
2 tsp cornstarch
2 tsp cold water

Sweat the garlic, shallots, chili and lemongrass in a sauce pan on medium heat.

Stir in the curry powder and allow it to toast for about twenty seconds before adding the shrimp stock and fish sauce. If you were disobedient and didn’t make the shrimp stock, use water and double the fish sauce.

Turn the heat up and simmer for twenty minutes. Meanwhile, make a slurry of the cornstarch and water.

Remove the lemongrass stalks.

Strain the stock and return the liquid to the pan and bring it to the boil. Add the cornstarch slurry, stirring constantly until the sauce has thickened. Remove it from the heat.

Serve it warm.



As I was heating the pot for the gravy, my eyes lit upon a chunk of Canadian bacon, so I minced it and added it to the sauce. I recommend it. I found an avocado and used it as a garnish. I recommend that, too. The timbale format for the dish worked best out of several plating styles because it facilitated a mixing of the elements, which, you may be sure, I recommend.


 
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Chuck Tatum is Tiki
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Joined: May 12, 2011
Posts: 1674
From: Southern Cailifornia
Posted: 2011-12-24 3:30 pm   Permalink

This was one of those "Fake" Chinese dishes made up by a Chef at Vic's
get it Chow Dun, "Chow Done"



 
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Professor G
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Sep 03, 2011
Posts: 335
From: the Tiki Wastelands
Posted: 2011-12-24 3:42 pm   Permalink

Thanks, CTiT. That sounds about right. Not only will I buy that, I like it. It's worth a mention, though, that the dish, under any name, is legitimately Cantonese, or was before I had to go and mess with it.

[ This Message was edited by: Professor G 2011-12-24 16:12 ]


 
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Professor G
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Sep 03, 2011
Posts: 335
From: the Tiki Wastelands
Posted: 2012-01-19 6:30 pm   Permalink

Crème Rangoon



Once again, my T.C. Amigos de Aloha have gone around putting ideas in my head, or, more frighteningly, shining lights in the dim recesses of what I like to call my mind and making me remember . . . things.

One night at the restaurant, I was thinking about crab Rangoon while I was blowtorching a crème brûlée, and then, out of nowhere, I was thinking about crème Rangoon. I shook the dirty dessert notion off and hid it in the darkness of my soul. Then Tiki Tom D. brought up Rangoon in the Spam thread and it all came back. I had to put it together.

Turns out, I failed to dig the vanilla custard in the first experiment and a wonton wrapper was too dang small. It was a vanilla fried pie. I don’t like to do innocuous. So this time, I used an egg roll wrapper which gave me the appropriate material for crunching: the crab Rangoons of my memory had the filling enclosed in the fried shell, so that’s what I went for. I replaced the crème with a pineapple chess filling.

Pineapple Chess Filling
1 cup of granulated sugar
2 eggs, beaten
1/4 cup melted unsalted butter
1/2 tsp all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp cornmeal
1 1/2 cups crushed fresh pineapple

Mix the first five, then add the pineapple. Pour the mixture in a small baking dish and cook at 350° for about 45 minutes, until it is set. Chill it until you need it.

Cut six 7” egg roll wrappers corner to corner to get six triangles. Put about a tablespoon of filling near the right angle corner (that’s right . . . Jr. High math coming back to get you) and fold it over. You should have enough moisture from the filling that it’ll seal itself; If not, dip your fingers in a little water and moisten the edges you want to seal. You can make these any shape you want: beggar’s bags, flowers, or my favorite--abstract giant manta.



In the meantime, heat vegetable oil for deep frying, at 325°. If you have a fry-master-2028Z, that’s great. I use a big heavy pot and a candy thermometer.

You can drop these in two at a time. It takes no time for them to golden up. Pull them out; put them on paper towels to drain; repeat. Makes twelve or a few more if you feel like it. As they came out of the oil, I sprinkled a mixture of 4 parts granulated sugar to 1 part store-bought five spice powder (my home-made kicks a little too hard for this application).

I did two sauces: cinnamon whipped cream (1 cup heavy cream whipped with a little under 1/4 cup of granulated sugar and a few drops of cinnamon extract) and a mixture of pineapple preserves and orange marmalade melted with a few nuggets of ginger which were then removed.

There it is. I have messed with (respectfully) another Tiki classic. I hope you all enjoy and mess with these ideas in turn. Serve these little guys with ice cream? Absolutely. The sauce I did with my first experiment was a blackberry/ginger syrup that looked beautiful. Cut some of the pineapple out and replace it with toasted coconut. Dip half of it in tempered chocolate. Be your own mad scientist: mad scientists have all the fun.

Granted, it's a pretty weird kind of fun.

[ This Message was edited by: Professor G 2012-01-19 19:15 ]

[ This Message was edited by: Professor G 2012-01-23 13:38 ]


 
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MadDogMike
Grand Member (6 years)  

Joined: Mar 30, 2008
Posts: 7340
From: The Anvil of the Sun
Posted: 2012-01-19 8:49 pm   Permalink

Prof G, I always get excited when I see you have posted something in this thread. Looks really good and not all that difficult. Chess pie is one of those throwbacks from my childhood that I don't really ever see anymore, is it more common in the midwest? (assuming that's where you are)
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Professor G
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Sep 03, 2011
Posts: 335
From: the Tiki Wastelands
Posted: 2012-01-21 05:51 am   Permalink

MadDog,
I haven't seen chess pie on a menu in years. I've done this basic filling, only with toasted coconut replacing some of the pineapple, in tarts on a catering or two for guests of a certain age. As for location, I'm in northern central Texas, which likes to think of itself as West Texas, but is fully the MidWest, big ol' hats and pointy boots notwithstanding.


 
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jokeiii
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Sep 18, 2010
Posts: 359
From: Miami
Posted: 2012-01-23 07:14 am   Permalink

Out of sheer curiosity...why margarine and not, say, butter?

 
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Professor G
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Sep 03, 2011
Posts: 335
From: the Tiki Wastelands
Posted: 2012-01-23 1:00 pm   Permalink

Because I forgot to change it, Joke. I use the measurements for the filling given on a scrap of aged paper, but I replaced canned pineapple with fresh and margarine with unsalted butter (although a kiss of salt wouldn't hurt). Thanks for the good catch.

[ This Message was edited by: Professor G 2012-01-23 13:02 ]


 
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MadDogMike
Grand Member (6 years)  

Joined: Mar 30, 2008
Posts: 7340
From: The Anvil of the Sun
Posted: 2012-01-23 1:39 pm   Permalink

I don't ever buy unsalted butter - it sits in the fridge until one morning when you stumble into the kitchen for breakfast and accidentally put it on your bagel. BLEECH!!!
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jokeiii
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Sep 18, 2010
Posts: 359
From: Miami
Posted: 2012-01-24 06:24 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2012-01-23 13:00, Professor G wrote:
Because I forgot to change it, Joke. I use the measurements for the filling given on a scrap of aged paper, but I replaced canned pineapple with fresh and margarine with unsalted butter (although a kiss of salt wouldn't hurt). Thanks for the good catch.



Ah. OK. I asked because in a Paul Prudhomme cookbook he SPECIFICALLY called for margarine on some recipes saying that butter wouldn't work (I used peanut oil instead, I do not buy margarine.) due to the "insufficient oiliness" of the butter.

(To me, canned pineapple/juice tastes like fructose and metal.)


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jokeiii
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Sep 18, 2010
Posts: 359
From: Miami
Posted: 2012-01-24 06:41 am   Permalink

OK, here's another midcentury gem, from Thomas Mario, who was the food & wine guy at Playboy back when that magazine was the ideal read for the young urban sophisticate. (So, mid-1960s...copyright on the book is 1971, recipes date from late 1950s to 1960s.)

Baked Crab with Almonds, Samoan-style

13oz crabmeat (jumbo lump or backfin'd be my guess)
6 T. chopped almonds
1 T. oil (I'd use peanut)
2 T. butter
¼ c. finely diced onion (no specifics, I say anything but red onion would work)
¼ c. finely diced celery
2 T. flour
1 c. light cream (pref. NOT ultra pasteurized, although that's a bear to find)
1 t. soy sauce (I like San-J low sodium tamari)
2 T. brandy
2 T. minced "canned" chile pepper (I'd use a fresh, not-TOO-hot, chile)
¼ c. bread crumbs (fresh is best!)

Pick the crabmeat over to remove any stray bits of shell. Toss almonds with oil and toast them. (Original recipe said in an oven at 375F. I'd not waste the oil, and toss them in a dry skillet at medium heat.) In a skillet, melt the butter and sautee (no temperature given, I'd say medium) the onion and celery until onion is translucent. Stir in flour and cook to make a roux, add cream and cook "over a moderate flame for 5 minutes" until thickened. In a bowl, combine cream sauce, crab, soy, brandy, chile, and salt/pepper to taste. (Original also calls for MSG, but I left it out, not that I mind MSG.) Stir in breadcrumbs, spoon into 4 shallow baking vessels or "coquille" shells and scatter almonds on top. Bake at 375F for 20 minutes. (I'd let it go only to 10 minutes, seeing as how every single element of this dish is already cooked.)

I'm thinking this could also be "Rangooned" or made into something in the springroll family.

[ This Message was edited by: jokeiii 2012-01-24 06:48 ]


 
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