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Tiki Central Forums » » Home Tiki Bars » » Blowfish Bar – Flagler Beach, FL
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Blowfish Bar – Flagler Beach, FL
WestADad
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 31, 2009
Posts: 745
From: Tornado Alley
Posted: 2012-01-25 12:51 pm   Permalink

Hi Tom! Love your lamp of course, but the OA pieces are so awesome!

And your house is killer!

Best,
Chris


 
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TikiTomD
Grand Member (5 years)  

Joined: Sep 20, 2009
Posts: 684
From: Flagler Beach, FL
Posted: 2012-01-28 09:41 am   Permalink

Chris, mahalo nui loa for your comments!

For those into contemporary Tiki art, one need look no further than Tiki Central’s own membership... what an amazing diversity of talent! I like so much of what I see that it would be easy to fall prey to
hoarding. I’m hoping to stop short of clutter, but may have lost that one already. Regardless, as I contemplate new works of art, it’s necessary to remember that a beach house, any house for that matter, only has so much wall space.

The recent creations of Robert Jimenez (zerostreet) have been particularly appealing, so I was pleased to receive the art print and original concept sketches of zerostreet’s “The Fisherman God’s Dilemma” here at the Blowfish Bar...












This particular painting is so intriguing, with its foreboding mood. An attempt by MadDogMike to wrestle the story line from the artist yielded few clues. So, we’re still left to contemplate on our own what constituted the dilemma. Perhaps an understanding of the Fisherman God’s perspective, if possible to grasp by mere mortals, would help decode this...

The Fisherman’s God in Robert’s painting is clearly patterned after the Cook Islands Fisherman’s God, a vintage carving of which is on display at the British Museum...




There are some nice images of the Fisherman’s God on Cook Islands currency from 1987; note the emasculated missionary versions on the 10-dollar bill...








In Rarotongan theology, Tangaroa was the Fisherman’s God. As the principal god of Rarotonga, his domain was fishing, voyage and prosperity. In her 2010 Master’s thesis at the Auckland University of Technology, Through the Eyes of Tangaroa – A Voyage in Visual Form, Loretta Reynolds provided a wonderful overview in words and images of the subject. Also of interest, she cited Sven Kirsten, TC’s own learned authority, in her thesis.

Much of what is known about the Cook Islands Fisherman’s God came from Reverend John Williams, an English missionary of the early 19th century who voyaged widely among the islands of the South Pacific and wrote of his experiences in A Narrative of Missionary Enterprises in the South Sea Islands, originally published in 1837...




This engraving of Reverend Williams came from another book titled The Martyr Missionary of Erromanga by Ebenezer Prout; if you guessed from the title that things didn’t end well for the Reverend, then you’d be quite correct...




A map of Polynesia in the time of Rev. Williams, included in his book...






Rev. Williams describes the Fisherman’s God thusly...





His description of Tangaroa...




So, is the Fisherman God’s dilemma framed by these choices: (1) to allow those who call upon him to successfully fish and safely return, or (2) to do a bit of fishing on his own, killing and netting the spirits of the voyagers? There are clearly other impending elements of danger at work in Robert’s art, but this is perhaps a core dilemma each and every time a voyage is launched under the protection of the Fisherman’s God.

As to what happened to Rev. John Williams: In November of 1839, he and a colleague had the misfortune to land on the island of Erromango in the New Hebrides, now part of the island nation of Vanuatu. This was shortly after the inhabitants had been visited and pillaged by European sandalwood traders. After landing in Dillon Bay, the natives clubbed the two missionaries to death on the beach (some arrows were also discharged for good measure), then they were served up as a cannibal meal. Interestingly, in 2009, 170 years after the event, a ceremony of reconciliation was held on the island between descendents of those natives and descendents of the martyred missionaries.

-Tom


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zerostreet
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Feb 06, 2010
Posts: 1968
From: http://www.zerostreet.com
Posted: 2012-01-28 12:42 pm   Permalink

Thanks so much for posting the photos of the framed print and drawing and for the great info on the Fisherman's God! That picture your posted of the Fisherman's God is indeed the one I used as primary reference. I opted to make him a bit larger than actual size for the sake of the painting though.

Without taking too much space in your thread I will say that of the 3 choices you present at the end of your post, #1 is the one that applies to my painting. I was looking through a book of Oceanic Art my wife had checked out from the library while I was gathering some ideas for this painting. My 5 year old daughter had been asking me to include her in one of my paintings, as well as requesting me to one day paint a female chimp. So I initially had this idea of a girl holding a lantern in a boat with a female chimp as a companion. As my idea progressed, the ambiance went a bit "dark" as often happens in my work. Now it may sound silly to some, but I began to feel a bit odd having my daughter (albeit a fictitious version of her) be in an piece of work that had elements of danger and foreboding. So, when I came across the Fisherman's God in that book I thought that'd be a perfect element to add. In addition to the God, you will notice that the female chimp has her arm, protectively, around the girl. Also, the crane atop the "thing" that is being safeguarded by the chimps and hunted by something unseen, was added as yet another element of protection as they are portrayed as such in certain mythologies.

So, while I can't say exactly what it is the chimps are safeguarding or how they all came to be in this predicament, I can say that the heart of this painting is a father protecting his child.

Thanks again Tom!

_________________

Tiki Tower
The Art of Robert Jimenez
http://www.tikitower.com

[ This Message was edited by: zerostreet 2012-01-28 12:44 ]


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TikiTomD
Grand Member (5 years)  

Joined: Sep 20, 2009
Posts: 684
From: Flagler Beach, FL
Posted: 2012-01-28 7:22 pm   Permalink

Wow, Robert, very interesting and also very powerful! I had noticed the protective arm of the female chimp, but entirely overlooked the symbolism of the Crane, believed by many cultures to be an omen of happiness, loyalty, vigilance, justice, parental protection and longevity.

Given your statement, I can recast the Fisherman God's Dilemma another way: On a voyage of great peril and threatened by unseen forces, the Chimps call upon the Fisherman's God to provide safe passage, to include protection of a child and a mysterious thing that are culturally alien. Awkward though it be, the Fisherman's God is the greatest of all gods in this part of Polynesia, and he solemnly accepts the invocation, with his spirit net and spear ready for whatever is to come.

-Tom


 
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MadDogMike
Grand Member (7 years)  

Joined: Mar 30, 2008
Posts: 7398
From: The Anvil of the Sun
Posted: 2012-01-30 06:19 am   Permalink

Great research Tom, and great to get some more insight from the artist Robert. "The Fisherman's Dilemma" looks awesome framed and hung.

Speaking of hung, funny how they "politically corrected" the $10 bill idol and left the hooters on the sharkrider
_________________
When you hurry through life, you just get to the end faster.
Pirate Ship Tree House

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TikiTomD
Grand Member (5 years)  

Joined: Sep 20, 2009
Posts: 684
From: Flagler Beach, FL
Posted: 2012-02-04 05:42 am   Permalink

Mike, astute observation on the paradox of the currency bill images. It reflects a lack of good "staff" work on the part of the Cook Islands Treasury, or perhaps there is a Lorena, Catherine or Brenda in the Treasury busy cropping off phalluses on all the currency images...

Another art treasure from Robert Jimenez (zerostreet) was framed and now joins others at the Blowfish Bar. This mini art print is entitled “Moonlight on Ku”...






“Moonlight on Ku” has a certain menacing quality about it. Ku’s visage here conjures up Ku-waha-ilo (“Ku of the maggot-dropping mouth”), the man-eating god of Hawai`i. Ku in this form was the only major Hawaiian deity associated with ritualistic human sacrifice, conducted in a special kind of heiau (temple) known as a luakini (“many graves”). Victims were often strangled or drowned to avoid disfiguring their bodies so they looked more pleasing on the altar; sometimes they were poisoned with blowfish, whose internal organs contain a lethal paralytic toxin, tetrodotoxin. Should the smoke of fires from certain luakini fall upon anyone, chief or commoner, the unfortunate individual was subject to sacrifice at that heiau, as related by W. D. Westervelt in Hawaiian Legends of Ghosts and Ghost-Gods, published in 1916. The Mu (“body catcher”) and his assistants were on the lookout day and night from the heiau walls for potential victims.

In an earlier time, according to Hawaiian tradition, Ku was a kinder, gentler deity who was worshiped to produce good crops, good fishing, long life, and family and national prosperity. In this time, the Hawaiian people had an egalitarian society that embodied the spirit of Aloha. Then, according to legend, a high priest from Samoa named Pa`ao sailed to the Big Island in the 12th century. He is credited (blamed) for introducing a brutal system of kapu with many ritual restrictions, as well as ritualistic human sacrifice to the Hawaiian Islands. Heiau were built to Ku as a god of war and a god of human sacrifice… Ku-nui-akea (“Ku the supreme one”), Ku-ka`ili-moku (“Ku snatcher of land”), Ku-waha-ilo (“Ku of the maggot-dropping mouth”) and so on. For more reading, see Martha Beckwith’s Hawaiian Mythology (1940), W. D. Westervelt’s Hawaiian Historical Legends (1923), the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s web site and the Alternative Hawaii web site. In 1819, King Kamehameha II declared an end to the kapu system.

There are three surviving great Ku images from antiquity left in the world, one each in the Bishop Museum in Honolulu, the British Museum in London and the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts. Each is about six feet high and weighs 600 to 800 pounds. In 2010, all three were temporarily exhibited together in the Bishop Museum...

Three Ku's on exhibit in Bishop Museum's Hawaiian Hall



Ku from Peabody Essex Museum on exhibit at Bishop Museum, posted by maxandcats on Flickr



Ku at British Museum



Some interesting related articles are “Farewell, for now” in the Honolulu Weekly of September 22, 2010; “Hawaiian Homecoming” in The Maui News of June 27, 2010; and “He’s Back – Ku returns amid honors from Hawaiian Delegation” by the Peabody Essex Museum.

-Tom


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zerostreet
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Feb 06, 2010
Posts: 1968
From: http://www.zerostreet.com
Posted: 2012-02-04 5:30 pm   Permalink

As always, all the info and links is much appreciated Tom!

Nice framing on Moonlight on Ku! So honored to hae my work flanking your wall unit in that amazing room!
_________________

Tiki Tower
The Art of Robert Jimenez
http://www.tikitower.com


 
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TikiTomD
Grand Member (5 years)  

Joined: Sep 20, 2009
Posts: 684
From: Flagler Beach, FL
Posted: 2012-02-12 05:58 am   Permalink

I framed another mini art print by Robert Jimenez (zerostreet), this one entitled “Summoning.” It now joins “The Fisherman’s Dilemma” on the left flank of the entertainment center in the Blowfish Bar...










I’m not sure what the artist’s concept was, but the somber expression of a hula girl dancing amidst flames is iconic for Pele, Hawaiian Goddess of the Volcano. The words of Herb Kawainui Kâne resonate...

Quote:
“She is Pele-honua-mea, Pele of the Sacred Land. She is Pele-`ai`houna, Pele the eater of land, when she devours the land with her flames.

She who rules the volcanoes of Hawai`i, and Mankind has no power to resist her. When Pele is heard from, her word is the final word.

Possessing the power to create new land, Pele has a volcanic personality--an impetuous, lusty nature, jealous, unpredictable, capable of sudden fury and great violence. Yet she can also be gentle, loving, and as serene as her forests of ferns and flowering trees.

In folklore she may appear as a tall, beautiful young woman, or as an old woman, wrinkled and bent with age, sometimes accompanied by a white dog. When enraged, she may appear as a woman all aflame or as pure flame. Her sacred name as a spirit is Ka-`ula-o-ke-ahi, the redness of the fire.”



Reference: Pele: Goddess of Hawaii’s Volcanoes by Herb Kawainui Kâne (1987).

-Tom


 
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zerostreet
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Feb 06, 2010
Posts: 1968
From: http://www.zerostreet.com
Posted: 2012-02-12 06:26 am   Permalink

Nice symmetry you've got going there Tom! As always thanks for posting the pics! And is that an El Gato Gomez I see on the left side of the entertainment center? I've got a a similar one, in size only as mine is sci-fi themed painting.
_________________

Tiki Tower
The Art of Robert Jimenez
http://www.tikitower.com


 
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TikiTomD
Grand Member (5 years)  

Joined: Sep 20, 2009
Posts: 684
From: Flagler Beach, FL
Posted: 2012-02-12 06:45 am   Permalink

Yes, indeed, Robert, that is an El Gato Gomez painting. There's one on each side of the sliding glass door...




-Tom


 
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hang10tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2010
Posts: 4077
From: Las Vegas
Posted: 2012-02-23 9:59 pm   Permalink

Very cool

 
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tigertail777
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Nov 25, 2004
Posts: 671
From: Oregon
Posted: 2012-02-24 03:21 am   Permalink

Been a while, I finally caught up reading all your new postings. I cannot believe what you went through to get the home of your dreams, but what a fantastic sight it turned out to be! Really dig the outside porch with the spiral staircase. I am not sure I see any end in sight of your tiki purchases to cover the walls and in my opinion that is a good thing (yes, not all graphic designers like white space).

 
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TikiTomD
Grand Member (5 years)  

Joined: Sep 20, 2009
Posts: 684
From: Flagler Beach, FL
Posted: 2012-02-25 04:33 am   Permalink

Mahalo for dropping by and posting, hang10tiki and tigertail777... appreciate your comments.

Jesse, from my vantage, there's always room for more Tiki, though the spousal unit sides with JOHN-O in desiring a less cluttered look... I think I've already crossed pushed across that threshold a bit.

------------

While searching the artwork of Miguel Covarrubias, I came across this Florida tourist map printed over several pages in the February 4, 1946 issue of Life Magazine...






Subsequent letters to the Life Magazine editor contained various expressions of disappointment that the map lopped off the western panhandle of Florida (top left). The citizens of Pensacola were particularly offended.

------------

Here is the approximate location of the Blowfish Bar on the Covarrubias tourist map, south of Marineland and north of Daytona Beach, using Crescent Lake to the west as a lattitude reference...




-Tom


 
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TikiHardBop
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Feb 21, 2009
Posts: 424
From: Rockledge, FL
Posted: 2012-02-25 11:38 am   Permalink

And The Storm Shelter is right about where the girl with the sunglasses sitting next to the cow is (!?)

 
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TikiTomD
Grand Member (5 years)  

Joined: Sep 20, 2009
Posts: 684
From: Flagler Beach, FL
Posted: 2012-02-27 3:54 pm   Permalink

George, based on the map features of Cape Canaveral and Merritt Island, I'd place the Storm Shelter about here, near the grapefruit...




With those cattle nearby to the southwest, the Storm Shelter can be well provisioned with Javanesian Beef, one of my favorite Mai-Kai appetizers.

-Tom


 
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