FEATURES | MUSIC | BOOKS | DRINKS | FORUMS | GAMES | LINKS | ABOUT


advertise on Tiki Central

Celebrating classic and modern Polynesian Pop
  [Edit Profile]  [Edit Preferences]  [Search] [Sign Up]
[Personal Messages]  [Member List]  [Help/FAQ]  [Rules]  [Login]
Tiki Central Forums Creating Tiki Tiki Carving Tools Carvers Use
Goto page ( Previous Page 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 Next Page )
Tools Carvers Use
Aaron's Akua
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 09, 2004
Posts: 1594
From: Rancho Santa Margarita, CA
Posted: 2004-08-18 3:40 pm   Permalink

Thanks, Ben.

I didn't know that Harbor Freight had retail stores. I know you get what you pay for - these carving bits are cheap! BUT.... If they are going to wear out fast anyway, might as well get cheap disposable ones. At $0.85 each, I can get 8 of them for the price of 1 Dremel bit. My thinking might be wrong on this, & I'll soon find out when I start carving with them (haven't arrived yet).

Do you use name brand Dremels? If so, you've got quite an investment there. Do they last long for you? Can they be sharpened? I'm thinking that maybe I'm bearing down too hard & maybe wearing them out faster... Any suggestions?


_________________

"Ah, good taste! What a dreadful thing! Taste is the enemy of creativeness."
-Pablo Picasso


 
View Profile of Aaron's Akua Send a personal message to Aaron's Akua      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Benzart
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 09, 2004
Posts: 10358
From: Port Saint Lucie, Florida
Posted: 2004-08-18 8:13 pm   Permalink

Usually the burs are Not resharpenable. wear them down and throw them away. Your best bet is to get the Carbide burs that Lowes is carrying now. Like these, you use them for Heavy wood removal (on small carvings)


There are several sizes and shapes. You can get good prices if you shop around online. Do a google search for wood carving tools

Mine are fairly small since I only use them on Small carvings. The larger pieces I use gouges

These are the Knife cutters. They work well to cut straight lines and undercut things like ears and lips. They tend to "Get away" from you and will travlel all the way around the piece cutting it the whole way. If your finger is in the way, it will cut a slice all the way around it before you can say Sh**. Theyare Nasty, but useful. These can be purchased at Jewelry supply stores. Again google-'Jewelry tools and supply" and they are fairly cheap.

These are a specialty bur for creating large carbochon settings. For me they are useful on hardwoods to get the curves along the nose to facy and different lines like that.

The ones on the far end here arn "Saw" burs and can be used like a saw to cut linesor Stopcuts with straight lines. you can also print straight edge letters with these.

These are called Cup Burs and they will create a semiball or a row of half beads, thay can be used to makeasmile type line, or other round/half round decorativr lines.http://im1.shutterfly.com/procserv/47b4d639b3127cceb4fafd365b580000001610
The spiral deal is a spiral sanding disk to get into contours. these come in several grits and sizesand are really helpful in the santing and cleanup operations. the 2 next to it are Carbide cutters more on the Fine end. After the rough out with the course carbide kutzall bits, these come next to erase the deep lines left by the rough-out guys...(this is gonna be a long post..)

These are diamond burs. they come in 2 or 3 grits course, med and fine.they are good to clean up after the smoothe carbide burs. the last step before andpaper. Available at the wood carvers supply and the Jewelers supply stores, fairly cheep.

This is a.5mm ball bur, the smallest I have. I use it to get into tight places like between teeth, clean letters in a signature, anyplace that has a small space that needs to be cleaned up

These are different size and shapes used to clean areas that fit their shape, In a nostril, shaping teeth, hair, eyeswrinkles, bore holes.



These are small chisels and gouges used for removing wood and wax. in the last one you can see reflections of my fingers holding the camera. Thats how sharp I like to keep


These Hook Knives are my main tool on all but the Super hard woods. I can get the roughout with these fairly fast. On the hard woods like macassar Ebony, Maple, Cherry, Zebra wood, Cocobolo and such, I hac=ve to use the carbide tools on those and some woods Dull the carbides rather quickly. this is wha the super hard wood pieces cost more. They cost me more, not just for the wood, but for the tools and extra time it takes to carve it.
Well thats Lesson one on tools. There are still Many more tools out there, but these basic tools will create just about any of my small carvings. WAKE UP. No Sleeping in class

_________________


[ This Message was edited by: Benzart on 2004-08-18 20:20 ]


 
View Profile of Benzart Send a personal message to Benzart  Email Benzart     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Polynesiac
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Jan 29, 2004
Posts: 2079
From: San Pedro, CA
Posted: 2004-08-18 10:06 pm   Permalink

Great post here. Ben, thanks for all your insight and thanks to Mcdougal and octane too - it's always great to see what people are using to create such great works. I'll post my stuff after this weekend when my digi cam comes back from vacationing with my fiancee. but I had to respond to this:
Quote:
My first $6 Dremel wood carving bit is already dulling up, and I haven't even got through one tiki yet. Since there's really no way to sharpen these bits, it could get pretty expensive.


really? my dremel carving bits have lasted me a VERY long time. Granted, I use them mostly for soft wood (redwood) and occasionally for small exotic wood, but I've only had to replace one so far (in about 8-10 months). I'll probably have to soon, but that's a good run. Aaron, if the carving bit is burning the wood, instead of carving, check the RPM speed of the dremel and how you are carving with the bit - those can cause wood to burn with the bit being sharp.
the bits I do go through rather quickly are the grinding bits I use for smoothing palm, fine palm detail and rough sanding redwood. A new one of those runs about $2 at HOme DEPOT, but if you're selling the tiki...a new one for every 2-3 footer...not a bad investment.
pics later...

_________________

OMG! I'm on Instagram!


 View Profile of Polynesiac Send a personal message to Polynesiac  Email Polynesiac Goto the website of Polynesiac     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Aaron's Akua
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 09, 2004
Posts: 1594
From: Rancho Santa Margarita, CA
Posted: 2004-08-18 11:26 pm   Permalink

Benzart, McDougall & Octane,

Man, this is great. This is exactly what I was thinking of when I suggested this string...like carving 101. There is so much inspiration on TC in the way of photos and display of the art... but this is NITTY GRITTY DETAILS! I love it!!!

Benzart, you obviously put a lot of effort into that last post and your unselfish candor is so admirable. If more of our TC carvers reply to this post and share half as much as you have here, it will easily qualify as a "best of" string. Outstanding! Feel free to share as much as you like!
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Polynesiac,

I just got a new Dremel flexshaft kit - & only had a few carving sessions with it so far. I get 2-3 hours max carving time per week with my busy schedule, etc. Maybe I'm just getting impatient & trying to move too fast. I'm generally working full speed at 32,000 RPM. The bit hasn't been burning the wood, just not cutting as smoothly as before - I just assumed the bit was getting dull. Also, the palm I'm working on was dried for 9-12 months & may be a little harder than a fresher one. The carving is going pretty deep now & I think the wood is getting harder towards the center. The palm logs that you traded me are a lot fresher than this one, & may be quite a bit softer. We'll see on the next tiki. I think I remember you telling me that the fresh logs are a lot easier to carve. I'll slow down with the Dremel & see if it goes smoother. Thanks for the advice - I'll let you know how it goes.

Aaron
_________________

"Ah, good taste! What a dreadful thing! Taste is the enemy of creativeness."
-Pablo Picasso


 
View Profile of Aaron's Akua Send a personal message to Aaron's Akua      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Benzart
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 09, 2004
Posts: 10358
From: Port Saint Lucie, Florida
Posted: 2004-08-19 09:37 am   Permalink

Aaron, at 32,000 rpm, you most likley Are or Have burned the burr, Once it gets overheated, it loses its temper and will not hold the sharp edge. And don't forget that palm wood has Silica running throuhg its veins which is Deadly on tools. Get yourself a Kutzall Carbide bit or 2. Grt the Course ones (red) and they will cut better and longer.The heat does not hurt them. In fact whaen they get loaded up with wood you can use a propane torch to clean them. Just don't heat to RED Hot!
I'm glad you liked my post. If it helps one little bit then it is worth it. I will add more later on a different set of tools.
_________________
FACEBOOK

 View Profile of Benzart Send a personal message to Benzart  Email Benzart     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
finkdaddy
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 11, 2004
Posts: 2061
From: Wisconsin
Posted: 2004-08-19 10:31 am   Permalink

I just discovered I have a Skill brand Hand Grinder (or something like that. I don't have it here in front of me). It looks just like a Dremel-type tool, except I think it's a bit heavier. Right now it has a little cone-shaped grinder bit in it, but I think it would take Dremel bits.

I don't know anything about the rmp's or other specs. We used to use it at work for shaping small pieces of brass and aluminum.

Does anyone know if this would be a good wood working tool?


 
View Profile of finkdaddy Send a personal message to finkdaddy  Email finkdaddy Goto the website of finkdaddy     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Benzart
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 09, 2004
Posts: 10358
From: Port Saint Lucie, Florida
Posted: 2004-08-19 11:39 am   Permalink

Sure FinkDaddy, It sounds like a Die Grinder. It most likley has a 1/4 inch chuck and you can get a whole list of good burs for it. it is actually better than a dremel for log sized tikis as it has more power and the burs available are larger. There are steel burs at lowes and Home Depot, but thay will not last long. You are better off getting the Carbide burs. Here is a link to a good supply store. I use them all the time
http://www.treelineusa.com/frames/power.html
Just scroll down to the "1/4" Shaft Extreme Burs" and there you go. you have to click on each one to see the pic.
Good luck..

_________________
FACEBOOK


 View Profile of Benzart Send a personal message to Benzart  Email Benzart     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
finkdaddy
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 11, 2004
Posts: 2061
From: Wisconsin
Posted: 2004-08-19 12:24 pm   Permalink

Excellent! Thank you Ben. I'm always flattered that such a world-class artist would help out so many newbies. It's good for the soul to see someone so successful be so humble. You are a credit to humanity!

 
View Profile of finkdaddy Send a personal message to finkdaddy  Email finkdaddy Goto the website of finkdaddy     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Aaron's Akua
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 09, 2004
Posts: 1594
From: Rancho Santa Margarita, CA
Posted: 2004-08-19 1:34 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2004-08-19 09:37, Benzart wrote:
Aaron, at 32,000 rpm, you most likley Are or Have burned the burr, Once it gets overheated, it loses its temper and will not hold the sharp edge.


Ben once again supplies some very key and useful information. If I was that burr, I'd be pissed too! So, what RPM should I be using for standard dremel wood carving bits with Fan Palm?

Quote:

On 2004-08-19 09:37, Benzart wrote:
I will add more later on a different set of tools.



Since you offered....
You've covered the small stuff extremely well - how about tools for carving mid & large size tikis? I'm working on 2-footers now. Someday I'd like to do something really big (I loved your giant Maori Warrior posting - although something of that magnitude would likely lead to personal injury and possibly even divorce in my case). Another TC'er told me that you did all of the Tikis at the Tropicana in Vegas. I'm going to have to stop by and admire your work next time I go gambling.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

finkdaddy,
I saw some gnarly looking burrs the other day on line, but they were 1/4" drive - useless for a Dremel (I think Benzart shows some of these above). It sounds like they would work with your Die Grinder. Could you post a pic or 2? The Dremel is great for detail, but not good for removing larger amounts of wood on mid-size tikis. Cheeky's "Arbortech" (posted above) looks like a little too much. The Die Grinder sounds like it would be just right.


_________________

+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

"Ah, good taste! What a dreadful thing! Taste is the enemy of creativeness."
-Pablo Picasso

[ This Message was edited by: Aaron's Akua on 2004-08-19 13:36 ]


 
View Profile of Aaron's Akua Send a personal message to Aaron's Akua      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Benzart
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 09, 2004
Posts: 10358
From: Port Saint Lucie, Florida
Posted: 2004-08-19 3:46 pm   Permalink

Aarou, if you dig into the log with the bur at slow 5000 rpm speed, just see how it cuts. Keep increasing the speed until it stops cutting and starts loading up and not cutting. Every wood will be different. You will get the feel of it as you go. Usually when you purchase the bur it will show Max rpm. For the steel I woiuld say max would be about 8 to 10,000. The carbides about twice that.
_________________
FACEBOOK

 View Profile of Benzart Send a personal message to Benzart  Email Benzart     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Benzart
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 09, 2004
Posts: 10358
From: Port Saint Lucie, Florida
Posted: 2004-08-21 09:15 am   Permalink

Heres a pic of my workbench and the Birth of a tiki

_________________
FACEBOOK

 View Profile of Benzart Send a personal message to Benzart  Email Benzart     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Aaron's Akua
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 09, 2004
Posts: 1594
From: Rancho Santa Margarita, CA
Posted: 2004-08-22 2:46 pm   Permalink

Thanks, Ben - I guess I just thought faster was better. I'm going to try a new bit at slower speed & see what happens.

I wish my workbench looked like that.
_________________

"Ah, good taste! What a dreadful thing! Taste is the enemy of creativeness."
-Pablo Picasso


 
View Profile of Aaron's Akua Send a personal message to Aaron's Akua      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Mr. Dale
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 26, 2004
Posts: 300
From: a garage somewhere in Arvada, Colorado
Posted: 2004-08-25 12:44 pm   Permalink

Man Ben...you rock! Howza bout me and a few fellas just move in with ya for a few weeks and you give everyone a class!
You've got so much carving knowledge "logged" into that head of yours its unreal! Thanks again for this great post and sharing the wealth!
As far as all this goes and since Aaron asked, I do the rough carving of Tik's with a chainsaw. I put away my engine powered saws and 'invested' in a craftsman 3.5 electric, automatic oiling beast that I absolutely love. No fuss, no gas, no mixing.
Just add oil, sharpen, plug in and carve em up. And then when I get my basic shape I switch over to my 4" makita grinder with a Tunsten Carbide Grinding wheel that is the best thing I have ever found.
The construction guys on my crew build log buildings and shelters and etc. We have always been looking for an easy way to hollow out the 'saddles' the logs rest in and we used to use the arbortech attachments but we gave these wood grinding wheels a try and haven't looked back.
They are the same as what Benzart posted with the little carbide teeth but in the shape of an angle grinder wheel. They come in coarse, medium and fine. And in flat disced shape or curved disc shape and run about $50. Not cheap but we have yet to wear one out.
And lastly I use one of the carbide tips for my die grinder to get in and do detail work.
I can't find the angle grinder disc at Home Depot yet, I have to go through Woodcraft. But thats o.k. Those cats at Woodcraft really know their stuff.


 
View Profile of Mr. Dale Send a personal message to Mr. Dale  Email Mr. Dale     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Mr. Dale
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 26, 2004
Posts: 300
From: a garage somewhere in Arvada, Colorado
Posted: 2004-08-25 12:48 pm   Permalink

And oh yeah, like Master Ben said, keep your fingers out of the way. These things all bite!

 
View Profile of Mr. Dale Send a personal message to Mr. Dale  Email Mr. Dale     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Aaron's Akua
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 09, 2004
Posts: 1594
From: Rancho Santa Margarita, CA
Posted: 2004-08-25 2:12 pm   Permalink

Mr. Dale,

Do you perhaps own a digital camera?


 
View Profile of Aaron's Akua Send a personal message to Aaron's Akua      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Goto page ( Previous Page 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 Next Page )
U-Moderate:
  
v1.5

[ About Tiki Central | Contact Tiki Central | Advertise on Tiki Central ]
(c) 2000-2014 Tikiroom.com (tm), Tiki Central (tm)

Credits & copyright infomation