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Tiki Central Forums Collecting Tiki mug safety /lead tests
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mug safety /lead tests
luau63
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Mar 29, 2002
Posts: 14
From: texas
Posted: 2002-09-13 09:30 am   Permalink

has anyone found dangerous lead levels in the older mugs? i drink out of them regularly. like right now. are their any to definitely avoid? thanks! luau63

 
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SugarCaddyDaddy
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 03, 2002
Posts: 1500
From: Huntington Beach, California
Posted: 2002-09-13 11:26 am   Permalink

Quote:

[i]has anyone found dangerous lead levels in the older mugs?



Not me, but if you find dangerously high rum levels in your mug, just step aside and I'll handle it for you!

Actually it is a good question, since I have recently wondered about that too. Hopefully someone has found a way to lead test a mug and will let us know soon.

SugarCaddyDaddy
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Tiki_Bong
Deleted

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 0
Posted: 2002-09-13 10:13 pm   Permalink

I've got good news and bad news.

Which do you want first? OK the good new: yes, tiki mugs can be tested for lead content; bad news: the entire mug gets destroyed in the process.
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dogbytes
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Mar 24, 2002
Posts: 2241
From: seattle, wa
Posted: 2002-09-14 02:02 am   Permalink

here's a nondestructive at home test kit:

http://www.leadtestkits.com

if you have more concerns, i've got a friend in environmental health and safety training, we can ask her questions..

elicia

[ This Message was edited by: dogbytes on 2002-09-14 02:15 ]


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KokomoTikiBar&Grill
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 20, 2002
Posts: 429
From: KOKOMO, MISSISSIPPI
Posted: 2002-09-14 06:17 am   Permalink

I would never drink from my precious old mugs. I think that they are to be looked at and admired. I can tell you that everyone of them made before the 80's has lead based glaze and paint. However, some if fired to the right temp, you dont have to worry about. All you folks in California better worry more about what you breath rather than what you are drinking from.

 
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tikimug
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 01, 2002
Posts: 751
From: 1217 mi. North of the Mai Kai
Posted: 2002-09-14 08:57 am   Permalink

Well I don't drink out my mugs either. But my school of thought on matters of safety is, the stronger the alcohol content the more germs and nasties are being killed.

Though I'm not sure if this applies to the things that are listed on the Table of Elements.


 
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Trader Woody
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 2301
From: Tiki Manor, Forest of Bowland,UK
Posted: 2002-09-14 1:34 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2002-09-14 08:57, tikimug wrote:
my school of thought on matters of safety is, the stronger the alcohol content the more germs and nasties are being killed.



Absolutely! I'm convinced that the booze vs bugs argument has a whole lot of merit. Personal testing around the dodgy restaurants around the Mediterranean has proven this to be true. Drink to excess in dubious eateries and at least your belly will be ok.

Trader Woody


 
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Tiki King
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 13, 2002
Posts: 548
From: Lush tropical Santa Cruz, CA.
Posted: 2002-09-16 09:51 am   Permalink


Quote:

On 2002-09-14 08:57, tikimug wrote:
my school of thought on matters of safety is, the stronger the alcohol content the more germs and nasties are being killed.



Actually this is not the case with lead. Lead is a toxic heavy metal linked with all sorts of nasty ailments, birth defects, etc. unfortunately it is also cumulative, meaning that the effects of exposure may not show up until years later. It was used and is present in many older ceramic pieces, including, presumably, Tiki mugs. This is especially bad for Tiki mugs because the citric acid in pineapple juice, lime juice, soda, etc. leaches the lead out faster. However, all modern "food grade" glazes (in the U.S. at least) are lead free. they can not be labeled for food use without being lead free, and no reputable mug maker would use a lead glaze on food or drink ware these days.(if you are concerned, and you should be, ask the maker) Sadly, I would leave the old stuff on the shelf, and get some modern mugs for everyday use. Hope this was more informative than scary!
Cheers!
Tiki King

[ This Message was edited by: Tiki King on 2002-09-16 09:53 ]


 
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tikimug
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 01, 2002
Posts: 751
From: 1217 mi. North of the Mai Kai
Posted: 2002-09-16 12:12 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2002-09-16 09:51, Tiki King wrote:


Actually this is not the case with lead. Lead is a toxic heavy metal linked with all sorts of nasty ailments, birth defects, etc. unfortunately it is also cumulative, meaning that the effects of exposure may not show up until years later.




Party Pooper!

Actually I agree with what you said King. That's why I mentioned about the metal elements at the end of my post. I was primarily talking about organic or biological nasties. And to that I still say...

Kill'em with booze!!!!


 
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midnite
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 1230
From: 37? 47' N, 122? 26' W
Posted: 2002-09-16 12:14 pm   Permalink

TikiKing,

Barnacles!!!

"Sadly, I would leave the old stuff on the shelf, and get some modern mugs for everyday use"

Just after I buy 8 old PMP mugs to use as the "house" mugs for the new home bar. Oh well, I will sell a few, and keep the rest for once in a while when I want to tempt fate and imbibe a wee bit of lead. Cannot do much worse than the other "hazmat" situations I have around this old apartment.

The older mugs are so much better than anything one sees produced nowadays (apart from some Munktiki items and the odd piece from indie makers).

Shazbat!
midnite



 
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PolynesianPop
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 2368
From: Corona, Ca
Posted: 2002-09-16 12:36 pm   Permalink




_________________

Poly-Pop *



Bartender, make mine a glass of WATAHHH!!!!!

[ This Message was edited by: PolynesianPop 2013-02-04 20:33 ]


 
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Tiki King
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 13, 2002
Posts: 548
From: Lush tropical Santa Cruz, CA.
Posted: 2002-09-16 12:37 pm   Permalink

here are some more details...

Since the 1930s, the Food and Drug Administration has acted to protect the public from the hazards associated with excessive exposure to lead. These efforts, which have focused on lead from sources such as agricultural chemicals, lead-soldered cans, and glazes for ceramic ware, have resulted in a substantial decrease in dietary lead exposure. The dietary lead exposure for infants and children today is about one-tenth what it was10 years ago.

In its continuing program to reduce the public's exposure to dietary lead, FDA has revised its guidelines to lower the levels of lead that may leach from ceramic ware used to hold and store food. The revised levels reflect the agency's increased concern about the health consequences of human exposure to lead. FDA is also advising ceramic ware manufacturers to maintain careful quality control to minimize or eliminate the leaching of lead from their products. While the agency believes that most ceramic ware does not present a significant health hazard, it is concerned that some products can contribute lead to the diet. Consumers can take precautions to minimize lead exposure from ceramic ware.

Lead has long been recognized as a toxic substance. Adverse health effects--such as damage to the liver, kidneys and the nervous, reproductive, cardiovascular, immune, and gastrointestinal systems--may result from exposure to lead over months or years. Infants and children are most sensitive to lead exposure. Several recent studies have indicated that lead causes behavioral and performance deficiencies in children exposed to the substance at levels below those that produce physical effects.

Pregnant women should avoid lead exposure because of the sensitivity of the fetus to lead. Recent studies have shown that exposure of the fetus to low levels of lead in the mother's blood can impair fetal development and cause low birth weight.

The Hazards of Lead in Ceramic Ware

Lead glazes are used to produce a smooth, lustrous, and sometimes decorative coating on ceramic ware such as pottery, earthenware, bone china, and porcelain. The nonporous, glazed surfaces permit easy cleaning and contribute to good sanitation. If a glaze is improperly formulated or applied, however, or if the piece is improperly fired during the manufacturing process, large quantities of lead may leach from the glaze into food contained in the vessel. Even with properly glazed pieces, some lead may migrate to food; however, the amounts will be much lower than with poorly glazed pieces.

FDA samples and tests for lead leaching from imported and domestic ceramic ware sold in this country. However, the agency cannot check all ceramic ware. In 1986 alone, 873 million pieces of ceramic ware were imported into the United States in 46,000 shipments. In addition, products that enter the country through informal channels, such as those brought by travelers from abroad, are not monitored by FDA. These products may pose the greatest potential hazard because they may not have been produced using appropriate quality control procedures for glazing.

New Lead Levels

In 1971, FDA set informal guidelines for levels of lead leaching from ceramic ware products. These levels were tightened in 1979. They are now being further reduced because new information shows that lead can adversely affect the fetus, young children, and adults in amounts well below those previously believed harmful. The guideline levels for lead leaching from ceramic ware are being reduced as follows:


from 7 to 3 parts per million (ppm) for plates, saucers, and other flatware

from 5 to 2 ppm for small holloware such as cereal bowls, but not cups and mugs

from 5.0 to 0.5 ppm for cups and mugs

from 2.5 to 1.0 ppm for large (greater than 1.1 liters) holloware such as bowls, but not pitchers

from 2.5 to 0.5 ppm for pitchers.

The amount of lead leaching from the pieces is measured in a standard test involving 24-hour contact of the piece with an acid solution.
Guidelines for Consumers

The particular piece of ceramic ware and the conditions and patterns of its use affect the amount of lead to which a consumer may be exposed. More attention should be given to items used daily rather than infrequently.

Acidic foods such as orange, tomato and other juices; tomato-based products; wines; and vinegar-containing foods cause more lead to be leached into the food than do nonacidic foods such as water or milk. Similarly, more lead will leach into hot liquids, such as coffee, tea or tomato soup, than into cold beverages and foods. For example, frequent use of a lead-glazed mug for hot beverages is likely to increase lead exposure. Further, longer contact times, as when liquid foods are stored, may increase lead leaching. On the other hand, foods that are dry, nonacidic, and have little contact with the container, such as pretzels or candy, are not a problem.

If you don't know whether or not a particular item is lead-glazed, follow these guidelines to minimize the potential for exposure to lead, especially for children and pregnant women:


Do not store acidic foods in ceramic ware.

Limit the use of antiques or collectibles for food or beverages to special occasions.

Stop using items that show a dusty or chalky gray residue on the glaze after they are washed.

Follow label directions on ornamental ware that states, "Not for Food Use--Plate May Poison Food. For Decorative Purposes Only."

Do not store food or beverages in vessels that are highly decorated on the inside.

Be alert to conditions and patterns of use of ceramic ware that can increase lead exposure.

Acidic foods, high temperatures, and increased time of contact with food contribute to greater leaching of lead from the container to the food. Frequent use of the piece also will increase exposure to lead.
Testing for Lead

The amount of lead leaching from suspect items, such as highly decorated ceramic ware, can be tested in a commercial laboratory, but these tests are relatively expensive.

FDA is aware of three manufacturers marketing test kits for consumers to use at home. These kits were designed to test ceramic ware relative to the former guidelines, however, and their ability to detect lead release at the new, lower levels cannot be ensured. Nevertheless, they continue to be valuable for identifying items that release larger amounts of lead and should be considered for checking suspect items. These kits and their approximate costs are:


Test for Lead in Pottery ($25) and The FRANDON Lead Alert Kit ($29.95), Frandon Enterprises Inc., P.O. Box 300321, Seattle, Wash. 98103; telephone1-800-359-9000.

LeadCheck Swabs ($30), HybriVet Systems, Inc., P.O. Box 1210, Framingham, Mass. 01701; telephone 1-800-262-LEAD.

Lead Inspector ($20.95), distributed by Michigan Ceramic Supplies, 4048 Seventh Street, P.O. Box 342, Wyandotte, Mich. 48192; telephone 1-800-860-2332.

So there you have it...


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[ This Message was edited by: Tiki King on 2002-09-16 12:44 ]


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TheMuggler
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 26, 2002
Posts: 289
From: Brooklyn, NY
Posted: 2002-09-16 12:40 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2002-09-16 12:36, PolynesianPop wrote:
I mean, alcohol - a large part of what we drink is not exactly the healthiest thing to ingest.



I only use Healthy Choice Organic Rums and mixers, so all my cocktails are low calorie and good for you! At least, that's what the manufacturer says.



-Mike


 
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luau63
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Mar 29, 2002
Posts: 14
From: texas
Posted: 2002-09-17 06:24 am   Permalink

tiki king, you absolutely rock! i had no idea you were so versed in health/safety matters. i thought you were some rum-addled, irreverent party machine. thanks for the information- now i'll drink from modern mugs only. luau63

 
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Tiki King
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 13, 2002
Posts: 548
From: Lush tropical Santa Cruz, CA.
Posted: 2002-09-17 10:02 am   Permalink

Thanks, but just to be clear, I AM a rum-addled, irreverent party machine.
Cheers!
T.K.
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