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Tiki Central Forums Beyond Tiki Duran Duran "astronaut"
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Duran Duran "astronaut"
tiki mick
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Joined: Aug 11, 2003
Posts: 398
From: Socal
Posted: 2004-11-23 11:07 am   Permalink

Yeah, exactly! I love that bass part on Rio. I was a total RUSH freak during high school, so I always appreciated good bass parts! Although Duran Duran and Rush may seem not to have too much in common, they are both bands that care very much about reaching for perfection. John Taylor may not have been the worlds best bass player, but he wrote great bass parts very much in the style of Bernard Edwards (RIP) and to this day, I can remember all of Taylor's parts.

There were a lot of great English bassists, like Mark King (level 42) and Nick Beggs (Kajagoogoo), bassists who transcended the pop bands they were in at the time!

I saw DD during the "reflex" tour in San Diego. They were an awesome band, not just a joke like BOW WOW WOW or FLOCK OF SEAGULLS or BERLIN (Bands that I like, but are hardly musical genius) DD played like a rock band should.

Thier new album is great. Listen to tracks 1 and 2 at high volume in your car, and you will know what I mean!


 
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vintagegirl
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Joined: Jun 12, 2002
Posts: 542
From: Los Angeles
Posted: 2004-11-23 11:21 am   Permalink

OK, I'm sober now. And I totally agree with Tiki Mick. In addition to being great bands, they are also really great showmen which is something really lacking these days. I went to see Martin Fry of ABC about 5 years ago and even after a bout with throat cancer some time ago, he sounded just as good as ever and came out in his gold lame suit and gave one hell of a show. The bassist from Kajagoogoo, I think, is the only one from the band still working as a pro musician. And though John Taylor from DD was originally self taught, he really stepped up his skills when he met Nile Rodgers who showed him a thing or two.

My personal favorite though is the bassist for Japan, Mick Karn. But not as many people have heard of him. Apparently, he could not read music at the time of being in Japan, but had one hell of an ear. They could play anything to him and he would instantly play it back. His style was also quite unique. Oh, and he had no eyebrows. After the break up of the band he went on to play with others such as Bill Nelson, Kate Bush, Midge Ure, Joan Armatrading, Gary Numan, David Torn and Peter Murphy.

I also heard a rumor that Haircut 100 were actually a bunch of jazz musicians that decided to go pop to make money. Can anyone verify that one? There have been some jazz bits on Nick Heyward's solo albums.

[ This Message was edited by: vintagegirl on 2004-11-23 11:39 ]


 
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tiki mick
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 11, 2003
Posts: 398
From: Socal
Posted: 2004-11-23 12:29 pm   Permalink

I love ABC!

Spandau Ballet, Adam Ant, Visage, Thompson Twins, Wham....all that stuff and I am not ashamed to admit it! These bands had great musicianship. Look at the first ABC album. I read a story about how Martin Fry recorded it, and the high level of attention to detail that he employed, how he would have a sax part play 30 takes just to get it perfect.

Another great band was Franky Goes to hollywood. The production on thier first album was by Trevor Horn (English producer and former singer for YES)

Pop, in our day, was the bomb. It was smart music, danceable music..and just plain fun music! Compared to the LINKIN PARK and AUDOSLAVE(good bands that I also like a bit)this music had class. I like what V-girl said in her first reply, about how people were more fashion conscious back then. Kind of like the retro-lounge culture a lot of us are into now!


 
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vintagegirl
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Joined: Jun 12, 2002
Posts: 542
From: Los Angeles
Posted: 2004-11-23 2:49 pm   Permalink

I know what you mean Mick. Kids also took more risks in trying to come up with new and different looks even if they got laughed at in school. Today they're all just sheep buying whatever's in the mall in one-size-fits-all. Also, it's thanks to the 70s punk rockers and subsequently the 80s new wavers that vintage clothing became acceptable to wear as or with modern clothing as part of creating those new looks.

And while Frankie Goes to Hollywood was great I was always sad that ZTT (their label) only had enough money to put on an all-out campaign on one of their bands (Frankie). One of their other main bands (also produced by Trevor Horn) was Propaganda - a German quartet known as the Abba from hell. If you like Frankie, check these guys out too on their album A Secret Wish.

Incidentally, the name for Trevor Horn's label ZTT (short for Zang Tumb Tum) came from a Futurist manifesto that talks about the art of noise (literally, not the band).
http://www.futurism.org.uk/manifestos/manifesto09.htm
Propaganda also had some pretty serious liner notes of the sort too. I love that kind of stuff.


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Geeky Tiki
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Joined: Oct 15, 2002
Posts: 533
From: Las vegas
Posted: 2004-11-23 3:40 pm   Permalink

I used to be absolutely sure that that one song they did was "Girls on Pills."

I was crestfallen when someone told me the real lyrics.


 
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tikibars
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Joined: Apr 11, 2002
Posts: 2024
From: Aku Hall, Chicago
Posted: 2004-11-23 5:13 pm   Permalink

Mick Karn was THE MAN. I'd have to say, actually, that Japan was my fave band of that era. All of the members are still doing music to this day. Japan were a huge influence on all of the other bands mentioned above on this thread, having come out a few years before the rest of them. I think their music holds up really well (especially LPs like Tin Drum), and their fashion sense DEFINITELY inpired DD and their ilk.

When I was a kid I listened to most of the bands mentioned above, and now I find that some of them hold up and some don't. In retrospect, A Flock of Seagulls, for example, were a really shitty band, save for perhaps some of the guitar licks on their first record. Frankie GTH, I hate to tell you, couldn't play their instruments at all, and their entire record (save for the vocals) was done by Trevor Horn on Fairlight and Emulator samplers (fact). They were the Ashlee Simpsons and Brit Spears of their day. Propaganda's record was made similarly (it was quite good tho!), and the first Art of Noise (the band, not the manifesto!) LP was also Trevor's samplers in action. But again, it's a good record, lots of fun to this day, no matter how it was made.

One band Mick, that you didn't like that deserves another listen is Bow Wow Wow. I pretty much wrote them off an disposable too, but give some of their albums a listen. There's some good playing there, and they are tight and have some cool tribal grooves.

Visage were great musicians, but they weren't a full time band, they were pulled together by a nightclub owner (Steve Strange) to back him singing his own songs. Still they were a dream-supergroup from the era, with members of Ultravox, Magazine (an AMAZING and largely forgotten band of the era), and Rich Kids helping out. Their first LP stands up to time. It sounds VERY dated, but it is strong enough musically to still work.

Another record like this is the first Missing Persons LP. They were all ex-Zappa sidemen (except the singer), and there is some really hot playing on that record.

Of course, their guitarist went on to join DD, which brings this thread full cicle.

And now:

Tiki.





[ This Message was edited by: tikibars on 2004-11-23 17:25 ]


 
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Geeky Tiki
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Joined: Oct 15, 2002
Posts: 533
From: Las vegas
Posted: 2004-11-23 5:30 pm   Permalink

Bow Wow Wow was cool.

Another Malcolm McLaren project, weren't they?

I dug "I Want Candy."

Candy, in this case, was a euphemism.

Thanks for knocking loose that old memory!

Do more!

________________________

Edited at the risk of invalidating the post:

That is cool trivia about Missing Persons, I did not know that.

I kinda spent that decade under the volcano, so to speak, so I'm digging your posts. I missed all those bands the first time around.

[ This Message was edited by: Geeky Tiki on 2004-11-23 17:32 ]


 
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tiki mick
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 11, 2003
Posts: 398
From: Socal
Posted: 2004-11-24 08:46 am   Permalink

Visage was a strange band, but also a really cool band! "The Anvil" "we Move" and "night train" were excellent songs. The 2nd Spandau Ballet album may have been thier best. Thompson Twins's second album with "love on your side" was great!

A very overlooked album was Adam Ant "strip" with Phil Collins playing drums on a few tracks. Human League had some cool stuff that still sounds good today.

Now, I actually saw an MTV or VHI bands reunited episode featuring Franky Goes to Hollywood, and although they had Holly Ivy, the main singer, they did have one guy that sang back-ups and danced. (Wearing a hard-hat more then likely!) but the drummer, guitarist and bassist were regular guys, and pro musicians. The orchestral stuff on that first album was done on samplers and synths by trevor Horn.

Missing person's first album still sounds good to this day, and i remember seeing them out in some lonely canyon one time, hooked up to a generator!

I used to dress really strange myself back then. I had multi colored hair, which I somtimes shaved off complelty. Bought New-Ro clothes at a store called GHQ at South Coast Plaza, and also bought vintage shirts at a place that used to be up on chapman avenue, where the santa ana hills start. There was some biker joint nearby at the time, I think it was "bobby Jean's" or something like that. A friend of mine scored a cool vintage bowling shirt, and the previous owner had put his name on the shirt as "beer"!!


 
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tikibars
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 11, 2002
Posts: 2024
From: Aku Hall, Chicago
Posted: 2004-11-24 10:06 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2004-11-24 08:46, tiki mick wrote:
Thompson Twins's second album with "love on your side" was great!



That was their third LP ("Quick Step and Side Kick" in the UK, "Side Kicks" in the US), and their first as a 3-piece. Their first two UK releases, "Set" and "A Product Of... Participation" were recorded as a 7-piece band (including one Mr. Dolby on keyboards), and were squished into a single-LP compilation for the US called "In the name of Love".

-encyclopedia James


 
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vintagegirl
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Joined: Jun 12, 2002
Posts: 542
From: Los Angeles
Posted: 2004-11-24 12:20 pm   Permalink

Hey Tikibars, did you ever notice David Sylvian's name on the liner notes of Propaganda's album (along with Glenn Gregory from Heaven 17)? Apparently they also contributed to the making of the album. Steve Jansen also accompanied them on one of their brief tours. I'm disappointed to hear that Propaganda may have not played the instruments on their album especially since Micheal Mertens was also the percussionist for the Dusseldorf symphony and you'd think he'd be playing in addition to the arrangements and writing he was already doing for the band. I actually got to meet Claudia Brucken a couple of years ago when she sang back up for Paul Humpreys (from OMD) here in LA. She was so pleased that I knew all the words to "Duel" (which she sang that night) and that I still had an interest in the new recordings she was then planning.

I'm also a HUGE David Sylvian fan and have followed his solo career since it started in 1984. (I've seen him live 3 times.) So I know what you mean by the huge infuence Japan had and what great musicians they all turned out to be. Early on, I used to see David Sylvian on the British mags and think "Who's that Nick Rhodes imposter?" Then I found out all about Japan.

Though I didn't know many of Visage's songs at the time, I'll always remember the video for "Fade to Grey". I love that one.

Also caught Bow Wow Wow about 6 years ago I thought they were pretty great live. Annabelle had more energy than ever.

I also loved Adam Ant, but preferred the pre-"Strip" stuff. "Stand and Deliver" really does it for me. That lip gloss he wore...oooh, baby! Apparently he was also a collector of antique clothing, even some museum pieces much like the pirate clothes he wore, designed by Vivienne Westwood.


 
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tiki mick
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 11, 2003
Posts: 398
From: Socal
Posted: 2004-11-24 1:21 pm   Permalink

"The scorpios" is my favorite Adam Ant song. I checked out a website earlier and there are very strange pictures of the way he looks now..shaved head! He also supposedly was in trouble for brandishing a gun in a pub.

 
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tikibars
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 11, 2002
Posts: 2024
From: Aku Hall, Chicago
Posted: 2004-11-24 1:58 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2004-11-24 12:20, vintagegirl wrote:
Hey Tikibars, did you ever notice David Sylvian's name on the liner notes of Propaganda's album



Sylvian apparently made a small contribution to the song "P-machinery". I think it was background guitar or a small keyboard part.

Sylvian's "Secrets of the Beehive" (1987) might be in my top 3 records of all time.

Best Ant LP has to be Kings of the Wild Frontier. FYI, his first three (Dirk, Kings, Prince Charming) were just re-released with many bonus trax. IMHO, those are the only truly great records the man made. "Scorpios" was a mix-tape staple for me, circa 20 years ago!

Shit, am I really old enough to have been making mixes 20 years ago?


[ This Message was edited by: tikibars on 2004-11-24 13:59 ]


 
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Tangaroa
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Joined: Apr 25, 2002
Posts: 1558
Posted: 2004-11-24 2:43 pm   Permalink

But... what about Bauhaus? David J still rules...
I heard he's a DJ for hire now...
_________________


 
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tiki mick
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 11, 2003
Posts: 398
From: Socal
Posted: 2004-11-24 2:46 pm   Permalink

I went and read the futurist letter from 1913..wow! This guy envisioned things that really did not occur until 1990, with powerful samplers and computer based samplers showing the waveshape and "fundemental" of any given sound. True enough, because if you used a keyboard sample and record a dog bark, or a cough, or any other shorter duration sound, you can go back and make melodies out of the lower and higher pitches. (like on Ferris Bueller!!)

 
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seamus
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Joined: May 07, 2003
Posts: 462
From: Portland
Posted: 2004-11-24 3:08 pm   Permalink

Great thread! Hey Finkdaddy, if you wanna hear some good bass playing, you should check out New Model Army. They started out in the early '80's w/ a dark post punk/angst sound and are still going strong, though have gone to a more accessable celt/brit/folk/rock sound. The rythym section is awsome. There have been 3 bass players, with the current being the longest standing. He goes by Nelson, and I've heard he played w some noteworthy '80's band but I can't recall the name.
I also love that Adam Ant Bow wow wow tribal drumming sound. Another often overlooked band of that era who have had a great deal of influence over bands then and even now is Killing Jokes (they did that catchy song titled "Eighties"). You cannot listen to their first 2 or 3 records without hearing similarities to everything from Adam Ant to Nirvana, to Ministry. BTW Killing Joke is still going too. Dave Grohl drummed on the last record and I caught their show in Portland. It was really, REALLY, GOOD.
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