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Tiki Central Forums Creating Tiki Tiki Carving Working With Big Logs
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Working With Big Logs
Aaron's Akua
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 09, 2004
Posts: 1594
From: Rancho Santa Margarita, CA
Posted: 2004-12-26 12:41 pm   Permalink

BobFJ40, Welcome to TC. Are you carving or doing other tiki art? That is super nice of you to offer the use of your lift. Mahalo! I've figured out that you're about 80 miles away, so it's probably easier to rent one nearby (and cheaper than the gas to get out your way). If I can do anything for you down the road, let me know. The great thing about TC is that everybody contributes advice & opinions & helps each other out. You'll fit right in.

I like your "redneck method". Reminds me of my favorite Alan Jackson song. I'll just make sure there's no kids in the way, throw it in reverse, aim for the driveway, & hit the brakes. With the bedliner it'll slide out slicker'n goose... well, you know. And yeah, you're right about the dolly. I could probably shore it up with a couple of 2x4's.

JT, that sounds about right for a commercial opeation with 8 big tikis. Well worth it. But in this case, I'm the owner, & I'm a real cheap b*stard! I called the local equipment rental. I can get a towable engine lift for $22 a day. They also have some kind of "drywall dolly" that the guy thought would work well. I have no idea what that looks like, but I'm gonna stop by there today & check it out.

MAHALO for the advice.

A-A
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Aaron's Akua
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 09, 2004
Posts: 1594
From: Rancho Santa Margarita, CA
Posted: 2004-12-26 5:42 pm   Permalink

Took the little guy for his first trip to the equipment rental yard today. Here's the engine lift with tow hitch - $22 per day.



Once I lift the log, I can roll this drywall dolly underneath the middle and strap everything down tight. It will easily roll 1,000 lbs or more, and can pivot around tight corners with the big caster wheels. $17 per day.



Hell, I could practically move a giant log all by myself with all of this rental equipment. So I guess I'm all set. I figure I can carve my giant tiki for about $100 in materials including the rentals.

That's it for now. It's all planned out, but probably won't happen for a month or so. I've still got to finish that little Leroy, and another five foot Ficus log is all skinned up & ready to go. After that, the BIG log project begins.

Thanks for letting me bounce all my ideas off you guys. I'll post some pics when I get started.

Aloha for now,

Aaron
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tikifille
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Joined: Nov 18, 2002
Posts: 123
Posted: 2004-12-27 09:48 am   Permalink

AA- Danny and Tony have the right method. Go to any hardware store and buy 3-4 pieces of schedule 40 pipe 1 1/2" - 2" diameter. Just role the log onto the pipes (which are spread evenly below the log) then roll the log forward. You still may need a few people to advance the log, and the small child photographed can move the pipes from the tail end back to the front as you advance. Also, you might want to actually REMOVE the tailgate prior to dragging the log off the truck. If the log is heavy enough, it will permanently bend the hinges of the tailgate and it won't ever close correctly again. This is a speaking from experience point.

 
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SCTikiShack
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 02, 2004
Posts: 151
Posted: 2004-12-27 3:33 pm   Permalink

AA,
There are special hand trucks made for moving plants that can handle up to 1000 lbs. Usually I will get one of my friends to grab one handle while I grab the other. I have moved several large redwod logs this way. Sometimes, I will get several pieces of abs pipe. You can set the log on top of these pipes and roll it by rotating them from the back back to the front (Egyptian Style).
I also wanted to let you know that I often find myself heading down to So Cal on 101. If you would like, I could drop you off a piece of redwood one of these days.

Will


 
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BobFJ40
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Dec 20, 2004
Posts: 24
From: Hesperia Ca.
Posted: 2004-12-27 8:40 pm   Permalink

Hey Aaron,
My Girl friend has family that lives in SC and she goes down there often so if you did want to borrow it just let me know and we can make it hapen. I am new to carving and I got started because I was buying big tikis for my house and was spending too much money so I figured I could save some money and have some fun at the same time. I am about half way finished with my first one and it is so much better than I would have ever thought. I am doing it on my luch break so I only get 30 min at a time. I have some more logs that I just got cleaned up at home so I might get started on one of them this weekend. I will post some pics when I get a chance.


 
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Aaron's Akua
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 09, 2004
Posts: 1594
From: Rancho Santa Margarita, CA
Posted: 2004-12-28 1:27 pm   Permalink

Tikifille, that's great advice. I'm using my brother's truck, so I'll make sure & remove the tailgate before I pick up that BIG log. I may still use the drywall dolly just for convenience sake rather than the pipe rollers. I think I'm only doing the BIG log once - gotta get it out of my system. I usually work with much smaller stuff.

Will, do you have any pics of that special hand truck? I'd love to see what it looks like. You mentioned in your other post how the logs wash up on your shore. That must be a real chore salvaging the big ones up from rugged terrain.

And yes, I'd love to get ahold of a real redwood log. The only redwood around here comes in the form of 4x4's. I'll PM you on that. MAHALO for the offer!

BobFJ40, Ditto to you. Thanks for the offer, & Ill PM you when I'm close to being ready for this project.

It's great to see that the aloha spirit is alive & well here on TC!

Quote:

On 2004-12-27 20:40, BobFJ40 wrote:
...I am about half way finished with my first one and it is so much better than I would have ever thought. I am doing it on my luch break so I only get 30 min at a time. I have some more logs that I just got cleaned up at home so I might get started on one of them this weekend. I will post some pics when I get a chance.



That's funny, Bob. I'm doing the same thing on my lunch break. It's hard to find enough carving time. Can't wait to see your first carving.

Cheers!

Aaron

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Aaron's Akua
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 09, 2004
Posts: 1594
From: Rancho Santa Margarita, CA
Posted: 2005-01-08 3:45 pm   Permalink

I'm ready to buy my first chainsaw, and doing a little research. There's just too many options for me, so I thought I'd ask for some TC advice on selecting chainsaws. I've figured out a few things at least:

1) Needs to be electric.
2) With a "carving tip" bar.
3) 1/4" link chain.

Here's my questions:

1) What is the best bar length for carving?
2) What's the best tip? Quarter tip, dime tip, etc...
3) Any favorite Manufacturers? I heard Makita made a great electric chainsaw that will work with 1/4" chain.

I'm sure there's lots of queations that I just don't know enough to ask on this, so any general advice on chainsaw selection would be great.

Mahalo!

Aaron
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Benzart
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 09, 2004
Posts: 10364
From: Port Saint Lucie, Florida
Posted: 2005-01-08 4:11 pm   Permalink

Aaron, go to Baileysonline for chainsaw stuff
http://baileysonline.com/chainsaw_carving.htm
The dime is great for carving detail so you Don't want that, besides it will separate on the end sooner that the others. the quarter tip is the best and the longer bars are better. Husquevarna has a new electric that is powerful And has an "Inline" Motor which is Super for more mobility. in other words instead of the motor being 90 degrees to the bar it is lined up going the same direction as the bar so doesn't stick out the side. Take my word for it , that is Much better. Now if I can remember where I saw it, I'll send you a link. Gas saws are great for mobility and power but lousy for noise and air polution. You really need both but for carving will use the electric the most.
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Benzart
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Joined: Jan 09, 2004
Posts: 10364
From: Port Saint Lucie, Florida
Posted: 2005-01-08 4:15 pm   Permalink

Oh and yes the 1/4" pitch chain is best for carving and you can get the 1/4 pitch sprokets for most all saws and Baileys has them. You also want Full Chisel Chain if you can get it. the anti kick back doesn't cut as well either.
Again Baileys is about the cheapest for chain loops.
I'll have to do a lesson on chainsaw carving?
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cheekytiki
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Joined: Mar 09, 2004
Posts: 1091
From: The Haole Hut, London, UK
Posted: 2005-01-08 4:40 pm   Permalink

I've been lookin at new chainsaws myself recently, theres the small top handled stihls that are great for detail work ( it is not recommended but you can use them one handed) and the husquavarna version, they even do a carbon/kevlar version but its expensive.These are not really for cutting up big logs though!
I've decided on the electric stihl as its got power and quiet it's only fault is its traditional style grip.
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Benzart
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 09, 2004
Posts: 10364
From: Port Saint Lucie, Florida
Posted: 2005-01-08 7:19 pm   Permalink

You talking about the .020's. Thats what I used to use.
heres a link to the Husqy electric
http://www.alamia.com/index.asp?PG=80&ID=380&VSP=1
If you want the best gas model, go with this 200 Stihl
http://www.stihlusa.com/chainsaws/MS200T.html
Like cheeky says the top handle makes it Really maneuverable.


[ This Message was edited by: Benzart on 2005-01-08 19:58 ]


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Aaron's Akua
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 09, 2004
Posts: 1594
From: Rancho Santa Margarita, CA
Posted: 2005-01-09 10:22 pm   Permalink

Ben and Cheeky,

All of this input helps tremendously. I definitely want to go with electric, it'd be strictly for carving. I'll just get the guy at the wood lot to do the big cuts at either end of the log with the long bar, & make sure he cuts 'em nice & straight.

You guys have given me lots to think about. The Husky looks nice. I'll take a look at the equivalent Stihl too, Cheeky.

I've recently allocated myself $500 to spend on tools. I absolutely must buy a mid size chisel set (been using flat Stanleys), so that will leave about $350. I've been keeping a "tools wish list" which has just been getting longer and longer. So, I think I'll probably get a standard chainsaw along with some other stuff that I want, then add the carving bar, 1/4" pitch chain, and sprocket kit at a later date.

Ben, that Husky link shows a 16" bar. Would you say that's the best all around length for "general" chainsaw carving?

Also, do you guys think I can get by with a standard bar (not carving tip) for a little while? The carving tip would be nice, but is it a "must have" item?

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Quote:

On 2005-01-08 16:15, Benzart wrote:
...I'll have to do a lesson on chainsaw carving?




Now really, Ben. Do you even have to ask???

Cheers!

Aaron
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keigs20
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 02, 2002
Posts: 530
From: WA
Posted: 2005-01-09 10:39 pm   Permalink

Hey Aarons Akua I use a 12 inch bar. 16 is good for cutting logs but you will get tired of holding the saw that much higher to use the tip. Then again if you taller like Benz a longer bar might work better. So far I have carved with only a standard tip bar and have done ok. I hope when I finally buy a dime or quater tip bar I will be amazed at how much easier it is to carve or it might be harder. Good luck with the big log

[ This Message was edited by: keigs20 on 2005-01-09 22:43 ]


 
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Benzart
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Joined: Jan 09, 2004
Posts: 10364
From: Port Saint Lucie, Florida
Posted: 2005-01-10 04:52 am   Permalink

You can do fine without a carving bar and a 14" works best for me. !6 is just too much and 12" not enough. The carving bar , once you get one is so great, you will kick yourself for not getting it sooner. I carved a Long time with a standard bar. When I finally did get a quarter tip bar I was really angry that I had not goten it earlier. It made a big difference in my carvings. It made the chainsaw a whole different tool.
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Sabu The Coconut Boy
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Aug 20, 2002
Posts: 2792
From: Carson, California
Posted: 2005-01-30 12:27 am   Permalink

Even though I don't have much to offer to the Creating Tiki forum, I do read it avidly and appreciate the skillful work done by the many tiki craftsmen here.

On the subject of big logs, I though you all might appreciate this old image of Barney West carving tikis at his Tiki Junction in Sausalito, CA. Check out the size of that tiki pole that is almost finished, then take a look at the log behind it, ready to carve next. That is one big log:


 
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