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Tiki Central Forums General Tiki Tropical Gardens with Hardy Plants
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Tropical Gardens with Hardy Plants
Polly_Nesia
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Jul 21, 2008
Posts: 47
From: California
Posted: 12 days ago; 4:43 pm   Permalink

This was a photo from 12/2015. It's grown and filled out quite a bit more since the weather has gotten warmer. Some fertilizer helps green it up and encourages growth. Love that it is evergreen and always provides privacy. Our fence btw is around 5 feet so you can judge the height. I will mention that you can top bamboo and it won't grow any taller if you prefer a hedge- rather than natural-look.



Some close ups of the culm/leaf structure. The mature culms for this variety should be around 1-1/4 inches.



This is the north SFBay nursery we bought our bamboo from:
http://westcountybamboo.com . If you click on the" Bamboo" tab it will take you to the species/varieties they carry. More importantly it will give you info on whether it's a clumped or runner, height, cane dia., lowest temp, lighting requirements and pricing. Very helpful if you are researching specific requirements.

Another great site for bamboo research is the American Bamboo Society. They have a more extensive list of species listed for various areas of the country and what I found really great was if you found a variety you wanted to find locally, they have a "Sources" button there that will help you find it. That's how I came to find the nursery we purchased from. Here's that "Species" webpage, and do check out all the other info they make available such as care, etc: http://www.bamboo.org/BambooSourceList/BambooPlants.php?G=All&M=1&Button=FIND&U=I&S=1 .

I will mention that you should be very careful to get the full name of the bamboo you decide on and ask for it because some are variations with different traits and you don't want to be surprised down the road as it matures. For example there's a difference in mature height, cane diameter and lowest temp. between Bambusa textilis, Bambusa textilis gracilis and Bambusa textilis var. gracilis.




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Luckydesigns
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Joined: Sep 15, 2002
Posts: 2268
From: Costa Mesa
Posted: 11 days ago; 11:06 am   Permalink

Bamboo scares me because of everything that I've heard about it getting out of control... but I would love to be able to plant it around the perimeter of my back yard fence...
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Luckydesigns
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Sep 15, 2002
Posts: 2268
From: Costa Mesa
Posted: 11 days ago; 11:15 am   Permalink

Poly_Nesia, I just read your post about bamboo on the other page. Looks like a good solution to my concerns. Thanks for sharing the info!
And thanks for the palm suggestion too!

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[ This Message was edited by: Luckydesigns 2016-06-17 11:16 ]


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AceExplorer
Grand Member (5 years)  

Joined: Apr 03, 2008
Posts: 1778
From: Deep in the Jacksonville Florida jungle.
Posted: 11 days ago; 12:12 pm   Permalink

Folks, a couple of years ago we bought about $10,000 worth of mature (12-15' tall) bamboo from this place:

http://beautifulbamboo.com

They sell "clumping" and "non-clumping" varieties and have a pretty informative web site. The non-clumping stuff creeps and expands, however they said it can be fairly easily controlled by breaking off the new shoots when they pop up. Otherwise just buy the clumping variety which handles the weather in your area.

There are some good reasons to buy the creeping/non-clumping -- the colors and shapes of the bamboo is diverse, and if you fall in love with a certain type of bamboo, you may choose to buy non-clumping and just keep an eye on it.

Have fun -- it's great stuff if it can tolerate your weather.



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Polly_Nesia
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Jul 21, 2008
Posts: 47
From: California
Posted: 11 days ago; 1:43 pm   Permalink

Our HOA will not OK running bamboo but was OK with the clumping variety. Running rhizomes travel farther from the plant than clumping variety.

For people with small yard space and timid about considering bamboo in general, I'd recommend looking solely at the clumping variety. In either case you want to keep an eye out during growing season especially for new shoots emerging and decide if they are keepers or not. Easier to remove at the shoot stage than as a "bamboo pole". And you will want to thin out your clumping stand as time goes to keep it healthy.

Took this photo to show some of the new shoots emerging on ours. We'll go in this weekend and snap off the ones that are on the other side of our irrigation. You can also cut through the rhizome with a garden tool to kill off unwanted growth direction and dig out that unwanted portion. For maintenance think of the clumping in terms of canna growth, although our Canna intrigue spread much faster than our B. Textilis v gracilis does.



BTW each year will see the diameter of the emerging culms increase to the point of maximum diameter. What you see coming up will be the diameter of that culm for the life of it. Similar pattern for the height. Bamboo is pretty slow the first two years in ground. Very cool plant and some gorgeous culm colors as mentioned on the larger bamboo, cool looking shaped culms as well. Finding something "tropical" looking, evergreen, fairly fast growing for privacy, and relatively low maintenance gets to be a challenge especially for zones 9 and lower.

[ This Message was edited by: Polly_Nesia 2016-06-17 14:36 ]


 
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Polly_Nesia
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Jul 21, 2008
Posts: 47
From: California
Posted: 11 days ago; 3:19 pm   Permalink

I'll share one other site I found invaluable in getting educated in bamboo, Bamboo Garden. Good info on planting and care, including photos of cold hardy bamboo varieties. The photos of the rhizome structure was very helpful in understanding how both running and clumping propagate ( http://www.bamboogarden.com/Hardy%20clumping.htm#Clumping%20rhizome ). This is our first home with space for planting anything (more or less Mediterranean in the front and saved tropical for our backyard) and neither one of us has a green thumb so I did quite a bit of research. Glad to hear that the shared links and photos are helpful. We're pretty much planted out and have had a few years to see how things grow and now looking for additional tiki and landscape lighting to add to the beds.

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TikiPhil
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Nov 21, 2004
Posts: 150
From: Riverside, CA
Posted: 7 days ago; 12:48 pm   Permalink


Here's a good place to start your "researching":

http://www.landdesignpublishing.com/docs/LPCG%20Sections%201-3.pdf

Check out pages 52-53, 72-73, 92, and 116-125


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