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Tiki Central Forums » » Collecting Tiki » » Oceania, Etc: vendor of South Seas Art
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Oceania, Etc: vendor of South Seas Art
I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-04-30 5:55 pm   Permalink

Fellow collecting ohana, I have very exciting news. I have just met a husband and wife pair with a large store full of artistic wonders imported from the Pacific. NOTE: On their request, I have corrected and added additional information to this post.

The location:
Oceania, Etc.
3205 South Federal Highway
Delray Beach, FL 33483.
Owner: Dominique Rice
Store(561) 279-8099
home(561) 995-8445
email:
Cheetahdmr@aol.com
Normal Hours for both stores: By appointment
Call anytime. Since they live 5 minutes from the location, Dominique or Gary can meet anyone at the store within 5 minutes any day, including sunday, from early morning to 9:00 PM. If they are not home,there is an additional portable number:
Tracy Simon: (561) 843 1632.
Tracy can answer questions as well and get anyone into the store.

The store is located in a wee strip mall on the southeast corner of Lindell and Federal Highway.

Dominique and her husband Gary travel to the Pacific every year and bring back carvings, rare statues and masks from Melanesia & other remote places, furniture such as unusual handcarved doors, armoires and beds, canoes, weapons, body wear, traditional costumes, jewelry, mats,etc. They primarily sell to collectors and decorators. They are very excited to show their finds to the TC ohana. Dominque is able to answer your questions about where the works are from and their cultural significance.

Here is a list of the islands that comprise the works on sale: Papua New Guinea, Irian Jaya, Sumatra, Nias, Java, Madura, Bali, Borneo, Sumba, Timor, Sulawesi, Lombok, Sumbawa, Manus,and the Trobriands. Dominique also mentioned she had a few pieces from Australia.

Gary and Dominique are willing to negotiate a reduction of up to 40% off retail price. Mr. Rice guaranteed that they'll give a 10% discount for purchases of $100 or more in either store.

If you go, do call or email first to make an appointment. I'm willing to go with you since its in walking distance from my job. PM or email me. If you just go, please note the Rices are running their daughter's store,"Only Pocket change", which is next to Oceania,etc. Go into that store which is on your left, tell them that Liz Lang sent you, and ask to see their store. The daughter's store has some of their stuff too since they ran out of room in the main showroom.

For me personally, I was a kid in a primitive candy store. They got such a kick out of my excitement to tell y'all.

Added 11/24/05 Links to other Oceania, Etc. threads
By Domi's request, I've added the links for ease to her photos of visiting Melanesia, her own art and her Ebay store.

Photos of Melanesia
http://www.tikiroom.com/tikicentral/bb/viewtopic.php?topic=14568&forum=6

Dominique's own art
http://www.tikiroom.com/tikicentral/bb/viewtopic.php?topic=16503&forum=6&4

Oceania, Etc. Ebay store (Asmatcollection)
http://www.tikiroom.com/tikicentral/bb/viewtopic.php?topic=16844&forum=12

[ This Message was edited by: I dream of tiki 2005-11-23 05:34 ]


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Benzart
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Joined: Jan 09, 2004
Posts: 10363
From: Port Saint Lucie, Florida
Posted: 2005-04-30 6:19 pm   Permalink

Dreamer, thanks SO Much for posting this. They are only 90 minutes from me. I HAVE to get there soon...
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McDougall
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Joined: May 02, 2003
Posts: 489
From: Ft. Lauderdale, FL
Posted: 2005-04-30 11:04 pm   Permalink

Only 30 minutes from me, thanks for the info, I'll check it out for sure, maybe meet Benzart there. (Hi Ben)

 
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Benzart
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Joined: Jan 09, 2004
Posts: 10363
From: Port Saint Lucie, Florida
Posted: 2005-05-01 07:45 am   Permalink

Hi Higi, Maybe we can do it. I'll have to talk to my chauffer.

 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-05-01 10:34 pm   Permalink

BTW, I can arrange discount theatre tickets for any TC ohana who want to make a partial day of it in the area. The theater I work at is just south of Oceania over the canal. If you PM or email me with at least a days notice, I can make it happen.

 
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Nokala Rocky
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Mar 13, 2005
Posts: 80
From: Rochester
Posted: 2005-05-07 6:01 pm   Permalink

Went there on my short stay down south. Was closed! Had a number to call to get the artist to stop by and open up, but no answer. Oh well, next time!

 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-05-07 6:33 pm   Permalink

Nokala Rocky, I'm so sorry that happened to you. I'm going to get in touch with Dominique to get a better idea on when they are running their daughter's store. If their daughter's store is open, then someone is there to open Oceania, etc. I'll post what I find.

In the mean time, anyone wanting to see the store should please call or email them in advace to arrange an appointment.

I especially apologize for not being clear. They may have an OPEN sign up but the doors are locked because they are running their daughter's store next door. Will post more info shortly.

[ This Message was edited by: I dream of tiki on 2005-05-08 13:50 ]


 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-05-08 1:46 pm   Permalink

Nokala Rocky, I bring a message from Dominique.

"Hi. You came to our store and it was closed. We are so sorry. I am the owner. I was at Disney with my granddaughter. The store was supposed to be open. However, my daughter, who was working there, had an accident in which a hammer fell on her head from the top of a ladder. She had to be rushed to the hospital and was not allowed to go back to work the next day. As mentioned, I was in Orlando. As a result, there was no one left to work and both stores were closed. I am so sorry about that. If you wish, I am happy to send pics of the inside of the store so you may get an idea of what we have. Let me know. Take care. So sorry again."
Dominique
Cheetahdmr@aol.com


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Nokala Rocky
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Mar 13, 2005
Posts: 80
From: Rochester
Posted: 2005-05-08 3:53 pm   Permalink

Thank you so much for the responce! I'll be better able to buy something next time I'm down as I finally start work tomorrow. Sorry to hear about your daughters accident. I actually had that happen to me! Running up and down ladders and forgetting the hammer on the top shelf!

The store looks fantastic! I spent about 5 minutes peeking through windows, but only probably saw less than half of what was in there! I'll be back!


 
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joefla70
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 17, 2005
Posts: 354
From: Fort Lauderdale
Posted: 2005-05-09 11:58 am   Permalink

OMG. I pass by that place every day on my lunch break from work and I never realized what it was until now! A few days ago, it crossed my mind that from the name, it might be a purveyor of polynesian art, but I had not yet taken the next step to enquire. Thanks for finding this, Idreamoftiki. By the way, where do you work? I'm at the Sanctuary Centre at the corner of Yamato and Federal Highway.

[ This Message was edited by: joefla70 on 2005-05-09 11:59 ]


 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-05-10 1:24 pm   Permalink

Joefla70, I work at the Caldwell Theatre in Levitz Plaza. Yet another place you've been passing during your lunch break.

Amazing what was under our noses this entire time. PM or email me sometime. Maybe I'll join you on one of your lunch breaks sometime.


 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-05-10 6:14 pm   Permalink

Dominique asked me to post some photos of what she has in Oceania,etc. Very exciting.


"Statues from the sepik, mostly from Palembei village.

The village of Palembei is graced with two haus tambarans which are the men's houses. Unquestionably the cultural life that persists so strongly in this village has much to do with their presence as they preside over the village with the ghost of the previous spirit house close by. The crumbling house’s posts of the previous building remain until they become one with the earth again further reinforcing the continuing cycle.There, master carvers, whose work appear in Art Exhibitions around the world, created beautiful slim polychrome statues inspired by their spiritual beliefs and traditional tales. While firmly based in tradition, these contemporary works abound with both innovation and individual expression (not withstanding the relatively crude implements including stone adzes and drills and the shark skin rasps and polishes which are used to produce works of delicate grace.)

On the back wall are a few gope boards: In the Papuan Gulf province, located on the southern coast of Papua New Guinea, two dimensional works predominate superseding three dimensional sculpture in importance. Painting and relief carving is comprised of mostly symmetrical, curvilinear and chevron forms; red, black, and white compose the color scheme. Papuan Gulf art also shares stylistic elements with the central Sepik area and the northeast, suggesting a possible cultural link between these areas. Gope boards are elliptical in shape and incised with brightly colored abstract patterns. Warriors were entitled to have a gope board for each act of bravery and a board from the vanquished enemy's canoe held particular significance, transferring some of its previous owner's strength to the victor. Almost every ceremonial house contains numbers of oblong oval boards, with one side decorated with painted reliefs. Each of these gope boards is closely linked to a person or a special event; they are displayed with skulls of victims of head hunting rituals, either to protect clansmen from vindictive spirits of the enemy trophy heads or to enslave the spirits of the victims to the spirits of the gope."


"1) 3 hanging old textiles from Sumba representing royalty."

"2)A food hook from Palembei, PNG with a big round face: Food hooks are used functionally to preserve food and they hang from rafters in the hut: Food goods are hung from the hook in bilums (woven bags) or baskets to keep it safe from rats and mice, and children too!. Suspending food from the food hook discourages vermin, and the spirit thought to inhabit the hook is believed to retard spoilage. Skull hooks or racks have a similar use and display hanging skulls of ancestors or enemies."

"3) Behind the hook is a large handcarved green fish that was once hanging from the front of a decorated boat in Madura, East of Java. and on the right of the hook is an asmat plate reminiscent in design and color of the gope boards from a quite opposite area of this large island."


"A variety of smaller pieces except for the totem pole on the far left which only a section is seen. a beautiful 6 feet tall asmat work: the bisj pole. Especially created for the bis pokumbu, a war feast held before a headhunting expedition, they are perhaps the most impressive works of art by the Asmat, reaching heights of up to twenty feet. These poles are carved to commemorate the lives of important individuals (usually warriors)and serve as a promise that their deaths will be avenged. These works also assist in the transport of the souls of the dead to the realm of the ancestors. The mangrove tree, from which the sculptures are created, is actually turned upside down and a single planklike root is preserved (which will ultimately project from the top of the artwork). The imagery on the pole itself varies, but usually includes a series of stacked ancestral figures.

On the wall in back are seen some examples of framed tapa cloth from Irian jaya used in a region that has no cotton as a form of cloth and wear, made out of pounded bark and not woven then handpainted with motifs and natural pigments. The center statue represents a bride wearing the woven-with-nassa-shells' bride's veil shown on another of these sets of photos below."


"Varied masks, boards and statue from Palembei. All from PNG"


Trobriand statues
"Statue on left: The men of Japandai carve a unique statue representing an Aibom woman carrying a Chambri pottery fireplace on her head. During a long conflict with a neighboring village, these statues were set up in the village and gardens with offerings placed in the "fireplace" in a successful effort to fight the competing sorcerers' black magic. This figure has become popular and is also carved in Yenchenmangua and there, has other interpretations: it can represent the woman carrying coals during a wedding celebration, in a pottery fireplace shown on right, similar to the one represented on the statue’s head. These fireplaces are wide, scooped-out pots placed on the prepared earthen base in a slightly up-tilted position and wedged with stones for stability. Small fires are safely built in this open pot. Japandai is across the river and not far upstream from Pagwi. It is considered to be part of the Middle Sepik. Statue in center is a large beautiful piece from the trobriands with inserts of mother of pearl, extremely well carved with a precise attention to intricate and minute detail the Trobriands are famous for especially since carving tools are in a lot of cases broken shells and rusted nails from shipwrecks. Most carvings of the trobriands are made of ebony, kwila or rosewood.

Next to the statue on the right are 2 very old little lime containers and spatulas from the islands as well: Betel chewing is a central part of life in East New Guinea. Children even start chewing when they are a few years of age. Betel chewing is a mild stimulant which combined with lime reduces hunger pangs and produces a feeling of good humor, well being, and an increased capacity for work. The utensils used in chewing consist of lime containers, mortar and pestles to crush the betel nuts and lime spatulas like these that convey the lime to the mouth. All these items are decorated, the finest however being the work done on spatulas. Some carry highly stylized representations of human figures plants, or animals and should really be considered as miniature sculptures and intricate precise works of art. Betel chewing is part of working in the gardens, attending feasts, meeting friends, trade rituals, and making love for the people of East New Guinea and the Trobriands.

Chewing the Betel Nut : The husk of the nut is torn away using your teeth, the kernel is then taken and placed in the mouth and chewed. From the chewing saliva will build in your mouth. It is important not to swallow ... you must spit. If swallowed it can make you feel a little nauseated. Keep chewing! Take the mustard and moisten the end then dip it in the lime. Place it in towards the back of your mouth and bite the lime-coated section off and chew, don’t forget to spit. At this point your spit should turn red and you may feel a little light-headed. The effect is largely due to your chewing technique. You make the day of any local if you accept a Betel nut. A friend of mine did, he could not stop spitting saliva for 3 hours and was foaming at the mouth! That was the only result we could witness! We had a good laugh! The other "must" is to indulge in some fat and juicy grub worms for a memorable lunch, good local proteins that you can undoubtedly find at the closest Sepik Mc Donald from you !!"

[ This Message was edited by: I dream of tiki 2009-02-20 22:59 ]


 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-05-10 6:29 pm   Permalink

More pics


Jipae Statue Palembei
"This photo centers on a jipae full body costume from the asmat of Irian Jaya. The word Asmat means "wood" or "tree" people. Legends tell how their creator, Fumeripits, carved their first ancestors from trees, which he then drummed into life, standing back to watch them dance. The Asmat were to achieve world fame. Their art, whose most enduring tradition is elaborate woodcarvings, was to be recognized as one of the most powerful in the world. In 1961, Michael Rockefeller, son of the late America Vice-President, disappeared off their coast and was never found. The Metropolitan Museum has an outstanding collection of Asmat art, the majority of which was collected in 1961 by Michael C. Rockefeller.

Asmat body masks are full-length costumes made of plaited cordage composed of rattan, bark, and sago leaf fiber. The body masks are usually painted with red and white pigment, decorated with carved facial features, and given skirts made of sago leaves. The end result depicts an otherworldly being, which appears only for special funerary ceremonies, known as jipae. For a mask ceremony, the village creates body masks. Once the masks were made, dancers donned the masks and became "spirits" of ancestors, dancing into the evening and night. In the morning, the spirits led a single-file procession through the village, viewing all the changes that had happened since the last ceremony, years prior, and since their death. They also call it "Baju Setan" (Ghost Armor). During a "Jipae" ceremony, the close relative of the deceased may wear it to symbolize the spirit or ghost of the dead and parades through the village while the children and women throw rocks presenting the act of the chasing and sending the ghost to the spirit world."


"Asmat bark cloth framed on the walls, and a variety of large food hooks described above."

Food Hook to store food inside Sepik house.
This photo certainly explains how the food hooks were used. Very practical to keep out bugs, animals & small children.


"Different masks from differemt areas of PNG."


Dani Man
"A lifesize dani man in full regalia, phallocrypt, stone axe, head gear and all!"


"A great Palembei finial seen on the left of photo here as a tilted sculpture:
Among the finest traditional art forms of the Sepik region are the finials and other decorations that grace the roof line immediately above the gable at each end of the men's ceremonial house. Viewed from the ground the most visible figure is that of an eagle above a female figure. The bird soaring aloft often with outspread wings can be seen at the peak on both ends. This ornamentation can be seen throughout the middle Sepik region, and in each case reflects the particular carving style of the village. The meaning behind the iconography of all roof finials is common to all with variations. This version was told by senior master carver Simon Gambro Marmos from Tambanum village.

Long ago there was a woman who lived on a load anchor in the middle of the Sepik River. She thought she was about to give birth to a child but instead she laid three eggs. Two eggs became eagles and the other a crocodile who dove into the water. The two eagles caught men and ate human flesh. The crocodile stayed under the water and watched this happen, then went up and killed the two eagles. The human ancestors saw this and then built the haus tambaran with the finial figures shaped as eagles with crocodile tails. The woman is always present as the mother of the eagle and the crocodile.

In front, on floor, hand carved out-of-one-tree-trunk life-size crocodile from Timor, and above on the bed from Timor as well, a long hand carved sculpture of an asmat canoe full of warriors rowing towards the enemy and battle. In front on left is a headrest in the shape of a mythical animal with lots of colored carvings from the sepik region."


"A traditional Timor bed with 4 short hand carved posters, bed that comes apart and is easily reassembled: 11 pieces hand carved to fit into each other beautifully like a puzzle form it. Each plank of the bed is hand carved with geometric figures, stylized animals and people and is made of a large solid tree trunk. Although easily taken apart, the bed is very heavy as a whole! Sometimes 2 people are needed to lift each of the 11 planks. There is a nice oil from an artist from Bali that paints for the big hotels there, on back wall, and on right, some boat prows from the Sepik hang on the wall as well, crocodile sculptures that came from old canoes and were cut for posterity when the canoes rotted and were discarded."


[ This Message was edited by: I dream of tiki 2009-02-20 23:31 ]


 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-05-10 6:35 pm   Permalink

More Colorful components of the collection


"Here is a skirt worn by females in Trobriands on back wall. Traditional Banana Leaf Layered Skirt with natural colored pigments added, extremely consuming making these skirts as the banana leaves are shredded to threads and there are quite a few levels (as seen on the other people of melanesia photos you placed in the other tiki area)
http://www.tikiroom.com/tikicentral/bb/viewtopic.php?topic=14568&forum=6&14

In very front, statue from palembei: bride wearing bridal cap again


"A framed oil of a Huli man, a warrior from the highlands in warrior's gear. Next is an asmat statue and a handpainted table that I {Dominique} painted with designs reminiscent of the Huichol indians' art. It is not from far away!"


"A variety of colored items, mostly things I {Dominique} handpainted. Parts of couches handcarved in Java can be seen. Bottom left, a portion of a borneo baby carrier all done in beads. In back, some baskets woven in Bali .


"A great Timor door all handcarved in background. A lintel with open carving sitting in a canoe from the sepik river and a framed oil painting: the fisherman and his wife with matching frame handpainted as well. The artist that created this piece is from Port Moresby and his name is John Danger. I love that name and since PNG can be a dangerous place at times, it seems appropriate! A kina shell necklace or 1/2 moon mother of pearl piece hangs in the boat and there is also a nice mask from the sepik sitting next to the frame."


"Rare tumbuan, has been sold. A beautiful full size rattan costume with all sorts of paraphenelia attached that was once used in celebrations, from the sepik region as well."

"Few masks are worn directly over the face, which explains the lack of holes for eyes. Some are fastened onto a large cone-shaped wicker framework for a dance costume called a tumbuan. Raffia is knotted into the bottom hoop for skirting and flowers, fruit and leaves added on for color and power at the time of the ceremony. Other masks are made only for display, most often in the men's Haus, to attract powerful and useful spirits. The individual elements of the masks are complex, they often refer directly or indirectly to ancestor or clan spirits and totems such as pig, cassowary (muruk), crocodile (pukpuk), eagle (taragau), or a water and bush bird (saun). There are many different types of masks for different purposes. Short nosed wickerwork masks, such as this one, represent females but they are rarer. The male masks-costumes are worn with skirts to the knee, while the female skirts stop at the ankle. They represent the face of a supernatural being, a totemic clan ancestor, and are affixed, for the initiation dance of boys, to the woven body shroud called "tumbuan" (which in turn represents a spirit from the era of the creation). Any mask used in such ceremonies was closely associated with the supernatural because initiation involved, amongst other things, communion with the clan spirits. The masks represent the spirits of totemic names. Names are very sacred in PNG. No one actually says anyone's real name, including their own, for fear of drawing the attention of bad spirits or sorcerers. During initiations, the elder who wears the mask-costume becomes a spirit teacher who may say the important totemic names without evoking personal risk. He tells and calls out names for use in magic, for healing and for other spiritual uses. These names number in the thousands and only powerful men have this knowledge. Missionaries gave women catholic names but their real name remains a secret they will not divulge: they refuse to tell it to anyone in their own language as that would give other people power and control over them. If a village or clan has a lot of bad luck, the whole group may change their names and buy the rights to use masks from another clan in a different village in an attempt to fool the bad spirits or sorcerers. The resulting masks usually display characteristics of both groups. Each Sepik River village otherwise is independent and has a distinctive style of art. No two masks can ever be exactly the same, even in the same village. Each is crafted by a different artist, representing a different ancestor or spirit, reflects that artist individual flair and is therefore unique. As a matter of fact, copying is forbidden and sentenced by local law unless there is a formal agreement between the parties involved.

Masks and Statues of Papua New Guinea’s cultures serve a variety of spiritual, cultural and decorative purposes. Most of the masks found in PNG are from the Sepik region, where the production and use of masks is an important part of traditional culture. Ancestral masks represent deceased clan ancestors, totemic creatures that assist the tribe by interceding on a high plane to provide food, prevent and cure illness, while spirit masks embody tribal spirits who inhabit the surrounding jungle, & may come to the help of the tribe to counterattack sorcery spells meant to arm them.

Ancestral and spirit masks are not designed to be "worn" but are hung in men's houses, spirit houses and other locations of importance. Gable masks (usually woven from cane) are mounted on house gables to protect the occupants from the feared marauding spirits.

It is interesting to note that if a mask or any other object, is carved with gnashing teeth or a protruding tongue it is not intended so much as an erotic object but meant to ward off evil spirits."

[ This Message was edited by: I dream of tiki 2009-02-20 23:17 ]


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hewey
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Joined: Sep 14, 2004
Posts: 4278
From: Sydney, Australia
Posted: 2005-05-10 6:53 pm   Permalink

Looks like they got some really nice stuff. Pitty it is on the other side of the world...

Would love to see more pics of what else is there.
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