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Tiki Central Forums » » Collecting Tiki » » Oceania, Etc: vendor of South Seas Art
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Oceania, Etc: vendor of South Seas Art
I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-05-24 11:04 pm   Permalink

Geringsing cloth & how it is made

"The most prized ikat in Indonesia is the spectacular geringsing textile produced by the double-ikat method in the indigenous Bali Aga village of Tenganan Pegeringsingan, an incredibly time demanding process that is known to only a handful of weavers around the world: In Balinese, geringsing literally means, “without sickness” & the cloth is said to have magical, protective powers & is frequently part of the traditional costume of the village. These textiles are ritually exchanged to ensure the good health & prosperity of their owner. A single piece of geringsing fabric may take up to ten years to complete & mostly elders still know how to proceed with the dyeing & weaving techniques which are so laborious, difficult & time consuming that the knowledge of such fine art is rapidly being lost. Dyes are all natural as they have been for centuries hence the reds-browns-creams-blues colors used for the making of this rare piece of cloth, found nowhere else in the world except for this tiny Indonesian hamlet. The village of Tenganan, protected up to now from the outside world by its surrounding walls, has maintained its ancient pre-Hindu customs through a strong code of non-fraternization with outsiders: here also, unique ritual offering dances & gladiator battles take place as they have for times immemorial. Double ikat geringsing cloths are very distinct from other ikat cloths in existence & are known for their precision, subtlety & beauty. They are produced by a complex process in which dye-resistant patterns are tied to both the warp (lengthwise) & weft (crosswise) threads before dyeing so that the final pattern appears only after weaving is finished. It is a very laborious task as it involves tying, dying, winding, stringing & weaving the threads of both the weft & the warp to produce the elaborate design. The demanding & time-consuming process was perfected in only three places in the world throughout the centuries: India, Japan, & Indonesia but today, only in the tiny village of Tenganan Pegeringsingan on the island of Bali, can you find such rare & precious textile craftmanship. The exact & highly skilled process, still known to a few elders, ensures that when the fabric is woven, the design will appear precisely & create a magnificently colored figurative ground of great richness & beauty with birds, flowers, animals, dancers, or whatever traditional motif is chosen, in a geometrically stylized perfection. The technique is now a disappearing art as less & less weavers know or are capable of producing such difficult expert work which requires such tedious exactitude. Geringsing cloths are therefore revered & believed to possess magical powers that protect or cure the individual & the community from sickness; they are also indicative of social identity & wealth."


"The tools used below and some of the steps of the process as well"





"Different steps of the geringsing’s production, steps that take months as first. The right color must be obtained among other things over a period of weeks."








"Here is a picture of young girls wearing geringsing during a ceremony."

[ This Message was edited by: I dream of tiki on 2005-06-06 18:16 ]


 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-05-25 07:05 am   Permalink

Color!


"It seems some people like color, polynesian designs and such. Here is the section of the store most dedicated to color. We have amazing Sarongs painted by 2 artists from Bali and signed. Each sarong has vivid colors representing only tropical scenes which includes anything from underwater scenes to fields of water lillies, cockatoos and palms and orchids. Each is one of a kind. If anyone want to see any of them, I {Dominique} will be happy to take full photos of the variety. They are so beautiful that, if not worn, they can hang on the wall or be stretched on a stretcher and be used as a painting. You see 2 on this photo, one of water lillies and the other one with fish, these 2 artists have a great sense of color, vivid color that is and are my favorite in all of Bali."

"The rest around is some of the hand painted glass I {Dominique} paint for galleries around me. In the front -right side of the picture, there is a lime box with 4 compartments hand carved in Lombok and meant to keep implements from betel chewing such as nuts, lime powder etc... Also, a small food hook is laying on the chair on the left, chair and couch were hand carved in Java."


"Second picture is a better view of the couch. The rest is my {Dominique's} work, including the cabinet in back. The furniture from Java was influenced by the dutch occupation of parts of Indonesia. During those times, a lot of pieces were commissioned by the invaders to use for themselves during their stay, which streched over more than 2 centuries. As a result the furniture of Java has, to this day, a dutch colonial style with smooth intricate carvings of leaves and flowers running though. Very different from the geometrical maze designs found in Timor. You can also fall upon remains of the dutch occupation, here and there, such as blue and white bowls, grandfather clocks and other typical things that are not expected to be found in the tropics."

[ This Message was edited by: I dream of tiki 2009-02-21 23:40 ]


 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-06-06 7:02 pm   Permalink

"Here is a selection of additional Trobriand items and other things"

"Two beautiful blond bowls piled on top of each other. True refined Trobriands work, carved with shell pieces and other primitive tools and decorated with inserts of mother of pearl."

"Inside this one is a lime container from the Trobriands."


Detail of first bowl


Please note the Dani phallocrypts from Irian Jaya in the second bowl.


"A Trobriand Bowl with doves. As all these pieces are, a beautiful piece by a master carver."


An aside about the lime and the lime container seen above.
"Traditional Lime containers (used by men) from the remote and rarely visited Trobriands Islands (Pacific Northeast of Papua New Guinea) are made of gourds that have been grown locally then dried. The yellow plaiting is stripped from the inside of the seedpod, the brown from the outside. The neck is adorned with fine minute weaved basketwork which fiber strands derive from the banana tree and the round body decorated with miniature intricate time-consuming geometrical or animalistic designs usually hand-etched or burnt in all around the gourd (the band of burnt-in designs is typical of 20th century styles). Great care is taken in the motifs and their detail which represent the owner’s status. Closing the receptacle is a stopper which center is made out of tightly wound banana leaf capped with a boar tusk, also a sign of power. Coconuts with wooden stoppers were also used. The powdered mineral lime is chewed with betel nut. Special lime pots and spatulas were made from the skulls and bones of deceased relatives as well and increased the bearer’s protection from evil.

Gourds such as this one are often called Kambang in Malay, a dialect Melayu Brunei. This is a unique piece and a collector item. A long stick is used to get the lime out of the gourd. The decorated gourd and stick tell something about a man’s status therefore a laborious effort is made to create an intricate and rich looking design. Each gourd is thus a one of a kind detailed little masterpiece.

A traditional part of a man's personal paraphernalia in New Guinea and the Trobriands was his lime container and the spatula for betel chewing, a custom practiced on social and ritual occasions. Three substances are actually chewed together: the nut of a palm, which has a hot, acrid taste similar to nutmeg; the leaf, bean, or stem of the betel vine, which is a member of the pepper family; and slaked lime made from burned sea shells or coral or from mountain lime and kept in this container while not in use. Once chewed, the mixture becomes a mild stimulant said to reduce hunger, pain, create a sense of well being, and increase a person's capacity for work.

It may improve the breath, but it also colors teeth and saliva bright red. Some studies say it helps prevent tooth decay, but other studies show an increase in mouth cancer. A used wad of betelnut is spit out, not swallowed. For the non-user, this red spittle along left along paths and roads is the worst feature of this widespread habit."


"Lime powder for sale"

[ This Message was edited by: I dream of tiki 2009-02-21 22:12 ]


 
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hewey
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Sep 14, 2004
Posts: 4278
From: Sydney, Australia
Posted: 2005-06-07 06:03 am   Permalink

My computer is freaking out at all the pictures! So am I, but in a different way. Cool pics - thanks heaps
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www.kustomkultureaustralia.com

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Benzart
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Joined: Jan 09, 2004
Posts: 10364
From: Port Saint Lucie, Florida
Posted: 2005-06-07 10:19 am   Permalink

I'm freaking out with all the cool pictures and Fantastic art. Big thanks to Dreamer and Domi.
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Tikilicious
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 11, 2004
Posts: 179
From: NYC
Posted: 2005-06-07 5:48 pm   Permalink

So Liz, when are ya gonna take Christie and Chip and Andy and Steve and me? Hmmm? We are DYING to go with you!

Call me! And see you at the party this weekend!

Hugs and kisses!
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Capt'n Skully
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 28, 2005
Posts: 404
From: The Lost Lagoon
Posted: 2005-06-08 3:02 pm   Permalink

Really cool stuff- Thanks for sharing I Dream Of Tiki! (And Dominique!!)

I happened to be driving by today and stopped to look in the windows- Lots of good looking pieces- I was in a hurry, tho, so I didn't call. I'd love to see more.


 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-06-08 11:52 pm   Permalink

Part of a multi-panel door from a house in Timor.





See page 5 for more detail & a full description.

[ This Message was edited by: I dream of tiki 2009-02-21 22:53 ]


 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-06-09 12:09 am   Permalink

Asmat Canoes
"This shows two long asmat canoes with people or animals along them in the whitish color often obtained with lime and used on the statues. The two long canoes have no bottom because they were the canoes of the vanquished, the bottom taken out is the sign of their loss."



"Tribal warfare was officially outlawed by Irian Jaya's Dutch rulers in the 1950s. When the Indonesian government took over the administration in 1962, it began the repression and destruction of traditional Asmat art and culture. This was partly because the artifacts were closely linked to warfare, headhunting, and cannibalism, but it was also an attempt to impose Indonesian rule on the historically unregulated people of Irian Jaya. Due to harsh governmental actions which not only forbade all ceremonies and feasts because of their ties to headhunting, but also outlawed carving and the use of carving tools, these integral aspects of Asmat culture were in danger of dying out. In front of the asmat boats are 2 large rare asmat gourds used for storage."

More of the Asmat Collection

"There are two dark rare Ramu figures more than 5 ft tall. In the center are two large asmat shields used during battle. The Asmat of Irian Jaya are famous for their war shields with apotropaic designs."

"Some aspects of Asmat society have been preserved with the support of missionaries such as the Crosiers, who collected and safeguarded thousands of Asmat cultural objects after the 1962 ban and subsequent widespread destruction. The people of the preservation effort encouraged the Asmat people to pursue their traditional culture--without the cycle of killing that was once its focal point. In recent years the Crosiers and others have promoted the sale and trade of Asmat artifacts. Apart from directly benefiting the Asmat, this has created a market for the art which has ultimately engendered a larger awareness of the Asmat people and the changes that have occurred within their culture as they face a future in a world ruled by values far different from their own."

"Sepik masks are seen in front portion of photo."

[ This Message was edited by: I dream of tiki 2009-02-21 22:58 ]


 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-06-09 12:23 am   Permalink

Orator's Stool from the Sepik


"This is a picture of a large head in the forefront, from the sepik again. It is called an orator's stool. It is a full 5 1/2 foot figure and extremely hard to find and collect, but it is also a stool. The back of the tall figure has a little seat sticking out and part of the trunk it was carved from, except noone sits on it, that is not its purpose:

Formal debate is an important and popular practice for many of the Sepik River peoples. The principal accessory of expression during their often violent discussions is a carved represention of an ancestor kneeling or standing beside his personal stool. The disproportionately exaggerated hips, shoulders, and heavy, incised pectorals are characteristic of carvings from this region. The figure carved within the stool or chair probably represents a totemic ancestor. These often larger than life size orator's pieces are the central figures in the Haus Tambaran. No human being sits on these stools, only the invisible protective spirit is there who presides over ritual ceremonies or the settlement of disputes. Typically, an orator stands beside the stool and calls on the clan spirit to support his speech. To emphasis a point, the speaker may strike the "seat" of the stool with a bundle of croton leaves or grass. As long as a man holds the bundle of leaves or grass, he commands the floor. The speaker may gradually reduce the number of leaves in the bundle to show that he is progressing through the points he intends to make."

[ This Message was edited by: I dream of tiki 2009-02-21 23:45 ]


 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-06-09 12:38 am   Permalink

Individual statue stlyings of PNG
"You find different styles of tall standing statues from different villages of the Sepik river in Papua New Guinea. Each village has a definite style."

"An asmat war shield in back and some pottery from Lombok on stands with inserts of lozanges of painted shells."

"The high level of skill of the potters of Lombok, Indonesia, is remarkable. With very simple tools and clay from the local countryside, potters work in their homes to create earthenware pieces of great beauty and utility. Such pieces seen here are a perfect example of how such time honored skills have survived into the modern day. Combining blackened earthenware with rattan and bamboo basketry, artistic ceramics are created with a striking mixture of traditional values and modern appeal. Time consuming hand-etched decorations or shell inserts are added to many of the pieces, each is unique. For over 500 years, the people of Lombok, Indonesia have created earthenware pottery for food preparation, storage and ceremonial purposes. Remarkably, today's artisans still employ the ancient methods of their ancestors, producing pottery, with skills and creativity, that is as beautiful as it is functional."

[ This Message was edited by: I dream of tiki on 2005-06-09 08:28 ]


 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-06-09 08:38 am   Permalink

PNG Crocodile Statues

"They hold a Chambri pot on their head. I have mentioned earlier in this thread what these statues holding pots are meant for and these 2 that are about 4 1/2 feet tall but have crocodiles, salties as they are called in Australia, holding the pot instead of other figures. Below is an actual pot such as the one on the crocodile's head."


"Chambri pottery is essential for food preparation and storage in the thatched stilt houses along the Sepik River. Although some cooking is done outside, each house has an area where clay is brought in to provide a stable, fire-proof base for a gugumbe or fire dish or fireplace which is about 2-5 ft. in diameter, above.

Some Aibom clay Sago pots from the Murik Lake in East Sepik bear the sought after birds head as this one does (a spirit face designed to protect the contents of the pot).

Only the Iatmul speaking village of Aibom has suitable clay to make this style of pottery achieved with the coil method. The village sits inland off the middle Sepik River in the Chambri Lakes. Women collect clay from pits at the foot of Aibom Mountain behind the village.

In addition to fireplaces, Aibom women make sago storage jars and other smaller pieces. Most women make pots of all types during the wet season. If they marry outside the village they lose their access to the clay pits, but they can still make pots.

A potter starts with a double thickness base and adds coils of rolled clay in sausage-shape pieces skillfully placed one above another to build up the form till a finished shape emerges. The coils are smoothed to complete the pot. The pots are dried to the leather-hard stage under the stilt houses, a slow process in the tropics. Although men are also shown making a pot for ritual purposes, making pots is predominantly women's work. The village relies on the trade from these clay pots for much of its subsistence and they are often found in different villages of the Sepik area. Some decorations are often added, sometimes with filets or with finely detailed clay slip designs using natural earth colors of red, black and white. If the women shape the pots, the men traditionally shape the faces and figures on the ridge tiles, sago and ceremonial pots. Men also do the painting.

Firing is done before a big market day. The pots are set out in the sun to finish drying, then fired by heaping dried sago palm fronds over the mounded pottery. The firing takes from 30-60 minutes. The pots are properly fired when they turn orange. This produces a very low fire pottery.

Chambri pottery is traditionally traded, along with dried fish from the Lakes, for Sepik River sago flour and betel nut, as well as April River grass skirts. The Maringei people, who live close to the small channel into the Lakes, are the middlemen. Traders from Tanbanum village who also trade other pots from other areas, take the pottery as far north as the April River and south to the Murik Lakes near where the Sepik empties out into the sea. Everyone needs a Chambri fireplace and sago storage jars in their house, so there is a ready market."


"Another full figure from the Sepik with a textile from sumba as a back drop."


"Papua painted face statue is also a full figure from the Sepik. Behind the statue is a gorgeous sumba textile.

On the left, a very old and large gathering basket from central Kalimantan, Borneo: Great craftsmanship: The weaving is tight, controlled and consistent. Pattern is simple but decorative. The four upright corner supports are in perfect shape. It has a wonderful patina. Such pieces were used to collect harvest 's goods in the fields and carried on one's back."

[ This Message was edited by: I dream of tiki 2009-02-21 22:50 ]


 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-06-09 08:45 am   Permalink

Another Sepik Mask



"Here is an example of mask sticking a tongue that took the shape of a crocodile from the sepik river."

[ This Message was edited by: I dream of tiki 2009-02-21 22:56 ]


 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-09-28 08:02 am   Permalink

This ol' thread disserves a bump.
Dominique, Gary and their daughter Tracy will be vending at Hukilau 2005.

Dominique also plans to do live painting as well. Please do come check out their table.

Also, we have another thread in Beyond Tiki featuring more samples of Domi's own art.
http://www.tikiroom.com/tikicentral/bb/viewtopic.php?topic=16503&forum=6&10


[ This Message was edited by: I dream of tiki 2005-09-28 08:06 ]


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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-09-29 3:37 pm   Permalink

Have no idea how I overlooked this photo.

Timor Horse!

Around the bottom and side of the horse are a few samples of Domi's own paitings.


 
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