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Tiki Central Forums » » Collecting Tiki » » Oceania, Etc: vendor of South Seas Art
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Oceania, Etc: vendor of South Seas Art
hewey
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Joined: Sep 14, 2004
Posts: 4278
From: Sydney, Australia
Posted: 2005-10-01 4:45 pm   Permalink

Awesome pics

 
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I dream of tiki
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Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-11-16 7:10 pm   Permalink

Hooray for the latest installment of indigenous art. As before, I am including research by Dominique in her own words. Lets pick up where we left off with
BEADED WEDDING BASKETS FROM SUMATRA







"These fine and intricately woven traditional wedding baskets that we collected over the last 25 years were created using very time consuming traditional techniques. Each basket is unique, one of a kind and a masterpiece of miniature beading (translucent opaque multi-colored glass; drawn, wound, sewn on), Indonesia, Sumatra, Lampung Bay area, 1930-1960.
Beaded objects for private ceremonial use were usually created by amateur beadmakers: Baskets woven of natural fibers were covered with vintage cotton batik cloth that was then densely embroidered one at a time with minute European seed beads, bugle beads, seed tassels, and hassa shells. The decorations often includes sunbursts, butterflies, and a tree of life. These are traditional Western and Sumatran images representing protection, guidance, supplication, and remembrance. The baskets are used mainly for the presentation of wedding gifts, usually food or cloth. They are carried to the celebration on the head—a mode of transportation facilitated by their indented bottoms. Today, these baskets have largely gone out of fashion. They are infrequently used even in the rural communities of the region. Below is a Sumatra wedding party."



"Baskets woven with beaded decorations are more valuable for the simple reason that the minute process takes dexterity and time: one is produced over a period of 4 to 6 months.
The result is a delicate exquisite pattern of an incredible sturdiness. We hand-picked each piece for its beauty of design, mastery and quality, in small remote villages along our route. Each is a personal product that was once crafted by one individual and reflecting that individual’s special taste and talent."

"We also found, in Sumatra, 2 coolie hats beaded the same way as the boxes over the same period of 25 years, we never found others, we are assuming they also were used as gifts for Sumatran bride price during a wedding."

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[ This Message was edited by: I dream of tiki 2009-02-21 00:16 ]


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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-11-16 7:26 pm   Permalink

Just a question for those of you who frequent the thread. Do you want to see some info on the countries these items originate from? Details like geography, cultural facts about the people like agriculture. You know, atlas stuff?

My fear is that that information will start to overwhelm the thread with extra details. Its a lot as is on the works alone.

Another alternative is to create a separate thread in Beyond Tiki which we can link the geographic info for those interested.

Please do tell us what you think.

[ This Message was edited by: I dream of tiki 2006-03-29 13:52 ]


 
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freddiefreelance
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Joined: Feb 15, 2003
Posts: 2987
From: San Diego, Ca.
Posted: 2005-11-17 2:06 pm   Permalink

I usually check Wikipedia & the CIA World Fact Book for that Atlas-type stuff, but when the info is intigral to the social fabric that created the art I'd give a qualified "yes."
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Rev. Dr. Frederick J. Freelance, Ph.D., Th.D., D.F.S


 
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rodeotiki
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Joined: Jan 21, 2004
Posts: 1513
From: calgary
Posted: 2005-11-17 7:43 pm   Permalink

I have really enjoyed the updates , for me more info would be cool.

 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-11-19 5:38 pm   Permalink

Lets revisit Doors from Timor



"This Timor panel consists of 6 panels and 4 totem columns (155" X 86"), all fitting inside each other like a puzzle. Is is the whole front of a Timor house which looks exactly like a tiki hut, palm roof and all except with a lot of carvings all over."



"This is part of a rare handcarved ancestor house front with man and woman effigies collected in Timor (the whole panel could not fit on one picture), made of iron wood, a heavy and very hard wood. It has good luck geckos and other animals carved in the panels as well, a great collector piece: a section of the traditional beehive hut of the Timorese people. The figures represented, ancestor spirits and such are supposed to intercede on the behalf of the villagers and protect them from the demons that lurk around the villages. Nice patina too."



[ This Message was edited by: I dream of tiki 2005-11-20 16:58 ]


 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-11-19 5:47 pm   Permalink

Woven Figures, Mamari village, New Guinea

"Mamari is a small village that lies on the junction of the Korossameri & Blackwater rivers. These rare figures were constructed of cane woven together with strips of bark using cowrie shells for eyes. Figures are used as a toy by the children. There is a secondary use which I was told is do with protection of the children. The figures often show signs of wear and the flat bark twine soft from handling. Other Iatmul figures, mid Sepik: gumba fibre, gourd, cowrie shells, natural pigments."

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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-11-19 7:32 pm   Permalink

Back to musical instument. Not just any ol' flute....

KWAKUMBA: RARE FLUTES & FLUTE STOPPERS FROM PAPUA NEW GUINEA
Flutes known for being the longest in the world

"Traditional Papua New Guinean musical instruments are primitive and fall mainly into the percussion and wind categories.

The Sepik and Highlands peoples have developed a variety of flutes constructed of lengths of bamboo or cane & coconut shells. They bear elaborately handcarved wooden stoppers depicting human, animal or bird totems additionally adorned with hair, cassowary or casoar feathers, vegetable fibers, shells, seeds and clay-based paints like ochre. They are played during rituals and are considered to be voices of spirits."

"Like all the musical instruments, the flutes are used during rituals and initiations and symbolize the voices of the clan’s ancestor spirits and of the ancestral world & represent supernatural beings. They are played at specific events, usually in pairs. In the ceremonies of worship or initiation, two players must play about it at the same time."

"The long flutes have a low, melodic tone which resonates into the damp, tropical air. When two experienced men play a pair of the shorter flutes, their lively duet bounces back and forth like jazz. Traditionally, village women, children and uninitiated men are not allowed to see the flutes being played during the rituals since they are considered to be voices of the spirits so they are kept away from the women and the children like all the crowned objects.

Kwakumba is the name of the Bamboo flutes found in the Highlands of PNG. Traditionally only initiated men can play them. They are always played in pairs and are pitched slightly apart, the lower pitch - the masculine and the higher pitch - the feminine. Traditionally they play interlocking triplet rhythms that evoke sounds of the bush and village. Airi Ingram was taught Kwakumba by Tony Subam and Pius Wasi from East Sepik Province."

Latmul Sacred Flute Players 1999, Middle Sepik, Mumeri Village

"The Mumeri people originally came from Kamindimbit Village on the Sepik. During WWII, the elders worried that bombing raids might wipe out their whole village, so some of the people moved up the Korosameri River to its junction with the Blackwater River for safety.

The Mumeri men's Haus Tambaran is divided between two clans. They carve clan and ancestor figures and also make beautiful flutes. An item of this size, form and importance, would have been owned by a village or possibly a clan. Flutes often carry motifs or designs which represent clan totems. Flutes consisted of 2 to 3 meters lengths of bamboo, open at one end and sealed at the other with a flute stopper. Typically there was only one hole in the bamboo tube and the production of notes for the haunting music was achieved by men playing flutes with different lengths at the same time.

Below is an example of another large scarce flute stopper. On theleft, a bird effigy from the Yamuk village, Latmul group, Middle Sepik River, Papua New Guinea which was used as a stopper on one end of a 10 foot bamboo ceremonial flute. On the right, a complete flute with handcarved and handpainted (with natural pigments) bird and human face stopper mounted on its bamboo tube."


Music of Melanesia

"Our knowledge of Melanesian music stems primarily from a few early twentieth-century German studies in the Caroline Islands plus isolated German and American efforts before and after World War 2. These materials reveal a predominantly vocal tradition which emphasizes the heightened speech or the litany chant styles. Many of the Melanesian dances are sitting dances - people perform sitting down with much of the movement emanating from the upper body. The island choreography is principally the movement of the arms, which is very different from Africa which is movement of the feet - you rarely see a sitting-down dance there. The ancestral relationship between East Africa and Melanesia is manifested in that much of the music in Papua New Guinea is performed standing, not sitting.

When it happens, harmony may be based on any interval, though movement in parallel fourths or the use of a drone are the most common. Most singing is integrated with gesture, whether the music be a lament, an invocation, or a serenade. A great deal of the music is used to accompany dance.

Melanesia has the widest diversity of instruments in the region - all types of drums, slit-log gongs, a great variety of flutes and pipes - but no stringed instruments apart from the guitar and ukelele brought in by the Europeans.

As you head east into Polynesia, the Melanesian flutes disappear and the instruments become more sparse, but the passion of the music becomes greater - particular the harmonic content which comes straight from the heart. The "gospel choirs" of Tahiti are particularly astonishing. Music is a reflection of topography and people reflect the landscape they are living in. It is must be remembered that these people came to these islands by canoe and only carried what they needed to make the voyage. When they arrived at their destination, there often were no wood or material to make instruments. The canoes were considered sacred, so no effort was made to break them up to make a musical instrument. Broadly speaking, the highland people have more instruments because they have more wood and accessto other raw materials. The atoll people have shells and coconut trees to make instruments. The island people have traditionally few instruments because they didn't carry them in their canoes."


 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-11-20 5:41 pm   Permalink

Scottiki and his lovely wahine Jen came to Oceania this past weekend and were in love with the Timor furniture. These are for you to think about for the future.

Domi just sent me some photos of Timor peices that she's already sold, but are still very stunning to look at. Hope it will inspire the carving community as well.

Timor armoire





 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-12-02 5:56 pm   Permalink

We all know of the Polynesian tapa and have a pretty good idea of how its made. Well, there is also specific tapa design styles from New Guinea.

For the mean time, enjoy the pics.






"Tapa cloth has been and continues to be used in many ways in the Pacific. It can take the form of a blanket, a room of a ceremonial mask, or loose clothing. It is tradition in the Islands for people to exchange textiles during special ceremonies. The work each piece represents and the good "mana" of the woman who created it testify to the significance of the gift and provide the recipient with good luck. Today it is still customary at weddings for the bride and groom to be given large quantities of finely woven mats and tapa cloth, which are often worn around their bodies in layers as a sign of community blessing. Other passages of life that often involve the ceremonial exchange of textiles are births and funerals. Barkcloth dance capes and laplaps worn by, Papua New Guinea, below."


"Nearly 3,000 Maisin live in nine villages spread along Collingwood Bay, their ancestral lands in the north eastern part of the island of New Guinea. Maisin villages retain a traditional culture and subsistence economy. The villages lie far from roads. Villagers continue to garden, fish, hunt and gather wild foods and materials using the techniques of their ancestors. The vast majority rely on outrigger canoes and houses constructed out of materials from the rainforest. Maisin take pride in their customs, such as the initiation for first born children, marriage exchanges, the elaborate facial tattooing of adolescent girls, and the making of beautiful tapa paintings. Although each culture has their own distinctive visual style, tapa manufacture is fairly consistent throughout Polynesia. The inner bark of the Paper Mulberry tree is stripped, soaked and beaten with a wooden mallet on a flat topped wooden anvil (a tutua) to produce sheets of raw tapa. These pieces are then joined and decorated in ways specific to each area. Functional uses include clothing room dividers and bedding. Ceremonial use of tapa includes dance costume, mat coverings, as ceremonial carpet, as gifts at funerals and weddings and formal occasions associated with the state or royalty, and as room dividers on important occasions such as funerals. Contemporary use is limited almost entirely to the ceremonial situations and associated costume. Detail of barkcloth sheet (wan) made from mulberry tree bark, probably from the Maisin people of Collingwood Bay, Oro Province, Papua New Guinea. The open linear diagonal designs are accentuated with dots (sufifi). Their young women's traditional facial tattoos use similar patterning, right."


Barkcloth (tapa) from Oro Province, Papua New Guinea (Further information)

Oro Province dancers display the drama of barkcloth design. Barkcloth is made in New Guinea for ceremonial costumes and exchanges as well as for sale. Designs are specific to clans. Individuals may reinterpret traditional designs or create new ones. The rights to a design are often owned.

Barkcloth was widespread throughout Polynesia and parts of Oceania at contact. It was used for clothing and other everyday items and for ceremony. The generic term tapa probably came from the Hawaiian term kapa. Store cloth has replaced barkcloth for daily use, but it continues to be made for ceremonies. Tapa makers in the Pacific range from select groups of royal Polynesian women, to village women in craft cooperatives, to a single Highland man beating out his hat.

Cultivated paper mulberry is the preferred bark, although breadfruit and other forest trees are used if they have suitable thick, fibrous inner barks. Strips of bark are soaked, scraped and beaten out on logs or special tables/anvils with tapa beaters. The beaters are made of stone or heavy wood and are sometimes beautifully carved and patinaed from use. Damp, glutinous pieces of bark are over-lapped and beaten together to form large sheets. Sheets are folded and beaten out, refolded and beaten out yet again and again to make a uniform cloth without holes. Early explorers wrote that villages resounded with groups of chanting women beating barkcloth. Tapa can be made as thin and fine as lace or layered into lengths with the consistency of thick felt. Plain tapa, sometimes bleached to pure whites, was often important in traditional Pacific island ceremonies, but it was seldom collected by outsiders. Pattern books of tapa made in the colonial period were very popular. Pattern, whether traditional or contemporary, adds meaning to barkcloth beyond decoration. Alfred Gell writes in Wrapping in Images: Tattooing in Polynesia, Oxford University Press, 1993, that both barkcloth and tattoo designs are seen as an additional layer of skin wrapped around the individual.

Tapa patterns are created by staining, painting, stamping and stenciling. In New Guinea, the designs are hand painted. Traditional colors come from local clays, native plant dyes and charcoal."

Tapa Cloth and the Rain Forest
"The Maisin live on the edge of a rain forest. It is the source of much of their daily needs and the home of the spirits of their ancestors. Over the past fifteen years they have been approached by both forestry officials and representatives of foreign logging interests to consider selling the rights to this land. Villagers at first flirted with this idea, but soon Maisin in other parts of the country began to call for caution. They had seen the devastation caused by industrial logging in other areas, and had seen several companies renege on payments and agreements to invest in local infrastructure and development. They were also concerned about rising levels of alcoholism and violence in these areas. After extensive consultation in the villages, Maisin leaders last year declared their unwillingness to allow extensive logging on their lands. Instead, they are asking the national government to declare part or all of the area a national park.

The Maisin face two types of pressures. The first is economic. The village population is growing but there are fewer and fewer paying jobs available. As money becomes scarce, the Maisin are looking for other opportunities. Their villages are too far from markets for cash-cropping to be viable. Instead, they are hoping to increase the market for tapa cloth. Made from the pounded inner bark of the paper mulberry tree, tapa cloth is a traditional item of clothing and wealth made across the Pacific. Maisin women make the finest tapa in Papua New Guinea. This exhibition at Berkeley's University Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive provides the Maisin with an opportunity to introduce this art form to a North American audience.

The Maisin and other rural Papua New Guineans are also under increasing pressure from foreign logging companies and their allies in the national government. The Parliament is currently considering legislation that would make it easier for the government to permit logging over the objections of local landowners. Having largely destroyed the rain forests of southeast Asia, loggers are now slashing the forests of Papua New Guinea and threatening the future of the communities who depend on these resources at a frantic pace. The Maisin are attempting to forge a different path which can be an example for Papua New Guineans and westerners alike. They bring the message that the future of their rain forest--and the rights of the indigenous peoples who live in them--should concern every one of us."

[ This Message was edited by: I dream of tiki 2005-12-02 20:04 ]


 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2005-12-02 5:58 pm   Permalink

CHIEF’S HATS

Asmat chief from Irian Jaya


Toranja Chief's Hat, Tana Toranja, Sulawesi,Indonesia

"Tucked away amid the rugged peaks and fertile plateaus of south-central Sulawesi live many isolated tribes who share a common ancestry with the sea-faring Bugis, Mandar and Makassar peoples of the coast, conservatively maintaining many ancient crafts and customs. Coastal dwellers refer to these tribes collectively as the Toraja or “highland peoples.” According to traditional accounts, the Toraja left the island of Pongko, located to the southwest, some 25 generations ago and crossed the ocean in canoes (lembang). Arriving in Sulawesi, they made their way up to the Sa’dan River and settled on its banks. The Toraja have remained in this landlocked region growing rice and vegetables; during this century, clove trees and coffee were introduced. A small degree of outside influence was brought in by missionaries but for the most part, Torajan tribal customs and social structures endure as before.

To this day, the Toraja traditionally live in small settlements perched on hilltops & surrounded by stone walls. Each village is composed of several extended families which inhabit a series of houses called Tongkonan, arranged in a circular row around an open field. In the middle stands a sacred stone or Banyan tree used for ritual offerings, and granaries (lumbung) face the dwellings.
There are many feasts among the Toraja: they require an enormous outlay of material wealth and are usually held, as a result, from August to October following harvest. When enough goods have been set aside for the ceremonies, that it is a birth, a wedding or a funeral, the celebration begins. Buffaloes & pigs are first slaughtered & offerings of betelnut, fruit and “tuak” (palmwine) are made. The kinfolk must then observe a number of taboos including a rice fast that lasts several days, as dances & chants are performed. Feasting, chanting and dancing continues for many days through the night & buffalo fights alternating with boxing matches take place in between. In the end, the feast culminates with the ritual slaughter of buffaloes (up to 50 for a funeral), each by a single stroke of the sword. The blood is collected in bamboo containers to be cooked along with the buffalo meat & distributed among the guests.

This chief’s hat is an extremely rare find. It can only be worn by the chief of the village or the sacred martial dancers who perform the ritual dances. It will make a fine decoration item as well as a fascinating conversation piece for the amateur or collector of rare prized artifacts."



"Toraja warriors wearing the songkok. This helmet has iron projections in the shape of buffalo horns meant to deflect blows."

[ This Message was edited by: I dream of tiki 2009-02-21 00:07 ]


 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2006-03-29 2:02 pm   Permalink

bump

 
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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2006-07-08 12:55 am   Permalink

Aloha to everyone!

A lousy, lousy thing has happened to my dear friends Dominique and Gary Rice, the proprietors of Oceania, Etc. in Delray Beach, FL. The landlord has informed them that the rent on their store front is going to double in the very near future. This news has resulted in the decision to move out of the store's location, which means the gallery for Oceania, Etc as well as her daughter's store next door.

Alas, rent prices are skyrocketing all over South Florida, for both residential as well as commercial. Thus, there are no current plans to open a new store front. What will occur is they and their daughter Tracy need to liquidate as much of the lesser items quickly before the move that must happen before December 2006. They will very likely end up selling the delicate ethnic pieces out of their home, making it truly by appointment.

If anyone is interested in some tropical and unique items to decorate your home, a portion is being sold
online.

Gary and Domi WILL be selling at Hukilau 2006. Please do email Domi at cheetahdmr@aol.com if you are especially looking for something special so they can make arrangements beforehand.

Thank you for your interest and support.


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I dream of tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 12, 2004
Posts: 494
From: Pittsburgh, PA
Posted: 2008-03-03 7:57 pm   Permalink

Completely off topic. Amazing to see that shutterfly has not dumped the pics yet, yet the newer site has lost all the shots from page 4.

Hmm.. and so begins reconstruction of the page.


 
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VampiressRN
Grand Member (7 years)  

Joined: Nov 23, 2006
Posts: 5507
From: Sin City Lincoln Hills (NorCal)
Posted: 2008-03-04 05:23 am   Permalink

YEAH...glad you will restore the pics...the art work is amazing.
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