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The Dead Thread
cynfulcynner
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 24, 2002
Posts: 1800
From: Ocean Beach, San Francisco
Posted: 2005-07-21 12:51 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2005-07-20 18:52, Unkle John wrote:
I too saw Scotty at a con, he told of a story about helping this girl who was on the verge of commiting suicide.



He told that story at the convention I attended, too.

_________________


 
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King Bushwich the 33rd
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 10, 2005
Posts: 1168
From: Ling Cod Beach, CA 90803
Posted: 2005-07-21 10:11 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2005-07-21 00:51, cynfulcynner wrote:
Quote:

On 2005-07-20 18:52, Unkle John wrote:
I too saw Scotty at a con, he told of a story about helping this girl who was on the verge of commiting suicide.



He told that story at the convention I attended, too.





http://www.trekdoc.com

He tells the same story in the film documentary
Trekkies


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freddiefreelance
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Feb 15, 2003
Posts: 2991
From: San Diego, Ca.
Posted: 2005-07-26 11:29 am   Permalink

Maori actress dies
27 July 2005
By PAUL MADGWICK in GREYMOUTH

Maori actress, artist and intellectual Tungia Baker has died after a long illness.


She was best known for her role as Hira in the 1993 internationally acclaimed film The Piano, which starred Sam Neill, Harvey Keitel and Holly Hunter.

For the past 10 years she has lived on the West Coast, but as her cancer worsened she returned to the family home in Otaki, Manawatu, to be among her Ngati Raukawa people. She will be buried tomorrow.

Baker was well known in New Zealand acting circles, especially in the 1990s, when she appeared in short films and television dramas such as Mokopuna, a children's series, Mirror Mirror, and a period mini-series, Greenstone.

She featured in a 1998 Australian production, A Difficult Woman, and last appeared in a 2002 television drama, Mataku, directed by Cliff Curtis.

As well as film, Baker was a respected stage actress, with performances alongside fellow Maori actors Jim Moriarty and Rena Owen.

Having learnt to speak fluent Maori in her student years, she became respected nationally as a scholar of the language and teacher of traditional karanga (women's call).

In 1998, she collaborated with Richard Nunns on a CD using traditional instruments, and was also a prolific songwriter.

After moving to the West Coast, initially to pioneer a Maori management position at Grey Base Hospital, Baker scripted a play about Ngai Tahu prophet Te Maiharoa and was pivotal in community arts initiatives and festivals.

Her later weaving included tukutuku panels for the marae at Bruce Bay and reviving the lost art of kuta weaving.

_________________
Rev. Dr. Frederick J. Freelance, Ph.D., Th.D., D.F.S


 
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Tikiwahine
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 09, 2003
Posts: 3288
From: Victoria, BC
Posted: 2005-07-28 5:48 pm   Permalink

Horsing Around
(read at own risk)

When a Man Dies in a Sex Act with a Horse -- What's a Reporter to Do?




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cyntiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 28, 2005
Posts: 120
From: Yorba-Tiki-Linda
Posted: 2005-07-29 1:45 pm   Permalink

I'm trying to picture this! How does he get the horse in the mood?

 
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dogbytes
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Mar 24, 2002
Posts: 2242
From: seattle, wa
Posted: 2005-07-29 1:46 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2005-07-29 13:45, cyntiki wrote:
I'm trying to picture this! How does he get the horse in the mood?



he says "hay, baby"


 
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saxotica
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 03, 2005
Posts: 213
Posted: 2005-07-30 09:13 am   Permalink

Wiiiiillllllberrrr.

 
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freddiefreelance
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Feb 15, 2003
Posts: 2991
From: San Diego, Ca.
Posted: 2005-08-01 10:02 am   Permalink

The Incomperable Hildegarde, dead at 99
Quote:
Hildegarde, whose career as an international cabaret chanteuse spanned almost seven decades and who was credited with starting the single-name vogue among entertainers, died on Friday at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell hospital. She was 99.

Her death was confirmed yesterday by her longtime friend and manager, Don Dellair.

A regal figure in couturier gowns, jeweled glasses, glittering earrings and, in her later years, a curly platinum wig, Hildegarde influenced a number of other performers. She accompanied herself on the piano, always in her trademark long white gloves, and, fluttering a lace handkerchief, chatted between numbers, often poking fun at herself.

"Hildegarde was perhaps the most famous supper-club entertainer who ever lived," Liberace once said. "I used to absorb all the things she was doing, all the showmanship she created. It was marvelous to watch her, wearing elegant gowns, surrounded with roses and playing with white gloves on. They used to literally roll out the red carpet for her."

Although Liberace said he was careful not to imitate her, he did take a single stage name and used "I'll Be Seeing You," one of her best-known numbers, as his own theme song.

Usually billed as the Incomparable Hildegarde, an orchid bestowed on her by Walter Winchell, she was at the peak of her popularity in the 1930's and 40's, when she was booked in plush hotel cabaret rooms and supper clubs at least 45 weeks a year. At one engagement in 1946, she was paid $17,500 a week and 50 percent of the gross over $80,000. She was on the cover of Life magazine in 1939, had a top 10 radio show and traveled with her own orchestra and several dozen pieces of luggage.

Her recordings of such songs as "Darling, Je Vous Aime Beaucoup," "The Last Time I Saw Paris" and "Lili Marlene" became worldwide hits. Revlon introduced a Hildegarde shade of lipstick and nail polish, a nursery named a rose for her, and a linen company, picking up on the way she signed her autograph, introduced a "Bless You" handkerchief.

Hildegarde's admirers ranged from enlisted men and officers during World War II to King Gustaf of Sweden and the Duke of Windsor. In 1961 she was the guest of honor at a gala at which Eleanor Roosevelt presented her with an award naming her First Lady of the Supper Clubs.

From the 1950's through the 70's, in addition to her cabaret appearances and record albums, she appeared in a number of television specials and toured with the national company of the Stephen Sondheim musical "Follies." Her autobiography, "Over 50 ... So What!" was published by Doubleday in 1961. In 1980, she was in a revival of the 1927 musical "The Five O'Clock Girl" at the Goodspeed Opera House in East Haddam, Conn., and took part in a tour of "The Big Broadcast of 1944," which recreated radio programs of that year. She also did a number of lecture tours at universities and auditoriums, singing, playing, chatting and answering questions.

Born Hildegarde Loretta Sell in Adell, Wis., to German immigrant parents, she began her career in Milwaukee at the age of 16 when, as a music student at Marquette University, she played the piano in a silent movie house. In 1928 she joined a vaudeville troupe, toured for two seasons and then spent a year as an accompanist to various performers. She arrived in New York by way of Camden, N.J., where she struck up a friendship with Anna Sosenko, her landlady's daughter and a budding songwriter, who became the architect of her career.

"Anna was determined to be a songwriter," Hildegarde recalled. "She made me go with her to New York to sing her work to publishers." For a time, Hildegarde took a job as a song plugger for Irving Berlin. She emerged as the one-name Hildegarde after an audition with Gus Edwards, the impresario, who suggested she lose her surname. Ms. Sosenko became her business manager and the two traveled, lived and collected art together for 23 years.

Ms. Sosenko wrote "Darling, Je Vous Aime Beaucoup," which became Hildegarde's signature song, and was the singer's partner until 1955, when the relationship dissolved. The friendship resumed two decades later.

Although most of her career was in the United States, Hildegarde was engaged to appear at the Café de Paris in London when she was in her early 20's. She was not a great success, but the experience led her and Ms. Sosenko to take off for Paris to learn the art of cabaret.

They remained there for three years. Ms. Sosenko helped her perfect her technique, and she acquired an international flavor by learning to sing in French, Russian, Italian and Swedish. She also developed the precise diction that made every word clear and reduced her slight German accent.

Her name became synonymous with the best clubs on both sides of the Atlantic. In 1934, she sang at the Ritz Hotel in London during the Duke of Kent's wedding festivities. The next year she was back for King George V's jubilee, and she returned in 1937 for King George VI's coronation. She also appeared in several British movies and stage revues.

During the zenith of her career in the 40's, Hildegarde's name appeared on best-dressed lists, and people were stunned when she said she spent $10,000 a year on clothes. By the 60's, the sum had risen to $30,000.

"I rarely look back, " she said as she approached 90. "That's part of the secret of staying young."

She leaves no immediate survivors, her manager, Mr. Dellair, said.

During a 1993 performance at Manhattan's Algonquin Hotel, Hildegarde said: "Wrinkle, wrinkle, leave me alone. Go and sliver Sharon Stone."

"I can't imagine myself not performing," she said in 1995. "I like to be in harness. I'm good, I know I'm good, and I'm ready."

Another cabaret legend, Bobby Short, who died this year at 80, once said, "Hers was the slickest nightclub act of all time."


_________________
Rev. Dr. Frederick J. Freelance, Ph.D., Th.D., D.F.S


 
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saxotica
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 03, 2005
Posts: 213
Posted: 2005-08-02 07:38 am   Permalink

nice post...thanks!

 
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Pepe le Tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 09, 2005
Posts: 325
From: Vancouver, BC
Posted: 2005-08-07 1:17 pm   Permalink

Cuban singer Ibrahim Ferrer born 1927, died Aug. 6, 2005.
Here's a link to the CBC article:
CBC News



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freddiefreelance
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Feb 15, 2003
Posts: 2991
From: San Diego, Ca.
Posted: 2005-08-18 10:53 am   Permalink

From the LA Times:
Quote:
Joe Ranft, 45; Artist for Pixar Animated Films, Voice of Heimlich in
'A Bug's Life'


By Charles Solomon - Special to The Los Angeles Times


August 18, 2005


Joe Ranft, one of the key creators of Pixar's hit animated features
and the voice of Heimlich the Bavarian caterpillar in "A Bug's Life"
(1998), was killed in an automobile accident Tuesday afternoon. He was
45.


A spokeswoman for the Mendocino County sheriff-coroner's office
confirmed that Ranft was killed when the car in which he was a
passenger veered off the road while traveling north on Highway 1,
plunging 130 feet over the side of the road and into the ocean.


Also killed was the driver, Elegba Earl, 32, of Los Angeles. Another
passenger, Eric Frierson, 39, also of Los Angeles, was hospitalized
with moderate injuries at Mendocino Coast District Hospital in Fort
Bragg, according to the sheriff-coroner's office.


Ranft was widely respected as one of the top story artists in the
animation industry. He was one of seven writers nominated for an
Academy Award for best original screenplay for 1995's "Toy Story."


But Ranft spent most of his time drawing storyboards for animated
films.


"I don't know if people really understand what I do," he said in a
1998 interview with The Times. "When I say that I do story for
animation, they say, 'Oh, you're a writer!' If I tell them I'm kind of
a writer, but I draw, they get this puzzled look. But when I say, `I'm
the voice of Heimlich,' the lightbulb goes on and they say, 'Oh,
great!' "


Telling stories in one form or another was Ranft's lifelong passion.
Born in Pasadena, he grew up in Whittier, where his early interests
included movies, drawing, performing in school plays and doing
sleight-of-hand magic.


"I liked evoking a response from an audience through the illusion of
magic," he said. "Animation is the ultimate illusion, the illusion of
life: These characters don't really exist; we create the illusion of a
character."


Ranft entered the character animation program at California Institute
of the Arts in the fall of 1978. As a student, he was inspired by Bill
Peet's storyboards from the 1946 Disney feature "Song of the South."


"His pastel drawings were so alive, they just knocked me over. Even
though they were just still drawings, they screamed to be animated,"
Ranft recalled. "I knew that's what I wanted to try to accomplish."


Ranft left CalArts for the Walt Disney Studio in 1980, where he
quickly established a reputation as an exceptional story artist.


"Joe was the undisputed storyboard master at Pixar: His boards were
just inspiring," said "Monsters, Inc." director Pete Docter. "On 'Toy
Story,' his boards for the 'army man' sequence, which went into film
pretty much unchanged, became the model we aspired to on the film."


Docter added: "On 'Monsters,' he was a great mentor: constructive and
supportive and always a pleasure to be around. Joe was really a major
part of Pixar's soul. He was one of the key players who made all the
films what they are."


At Disney, Ranft worked on "Oliver & Company" (1988), "Who Framed
Roger Rabbit" (1988), "Beauty and the Beast" (1991), "The Lion King"
(1994) and "Fantasia/2000." He oversaw the story on "The Rescuers Down
Under" (1990) and was co-writer and supervising animator on "The Brave
Little Toaster" (1987).


More recently, he served as executive producer on "Tim Burton's Corpse
Bride," due this fall.


While at Disney, Ranft became friends with John Lasseter, who later
became a top executive at Pixar Animation Studios.


Their paths had diverged when Lasseter went to Pixar to direct a
series of innovative computer-animated shorts while Ranft did story
work at Skellington Productions on Tim Burton's "The Nightmare Before
Christmas" (1993) and "James and the Giant Peach" (1996), which were
distributed by Disney. But the two stayed in touch.


"John and I had a pact that when he directed his first feature, I was
going to work on it," Ranft told The Times.


Ranft moved to Pixar to serve as story supervisor on Lasseter's "Toy
Story," the first computer-animated feature. His understanding of
story structure and his talent for creating emotionally complex
characters that audiences cared about won him a place in the core
group of artists at Pixar, colleagues said.


In addition to working on the story of "A Bug's Life," Ranft got the
role as Heimlich's voice after Lasseter noticed that his wife, Nancy,
laughed harder at Ranft's temporary dialogue during production than
she did at the actor hired to voice the caterpillar.


Ranft served as story supervisor on "Toy Story 2" (1999) and provided
the voice for Wheezy the Penguin, the asthmatic character who makes
Woody realize he could end up forgotten on a shelf. Ranft was credited
with additional story material for "Monsters, Inc." (2001) and oversaw
the story on Lasseter's "Cars," which is slated for release next year.


"Joe had a great passion for telling stories, and he told them better
than anyone," Lasseter said Wednesday. "He was funny, poignant,
original, and he had an infallible sense for how to structure a
story."


Unlike many story artists, Ranft never expressed an interest in
directing.


"I've had people say, 'Oh, you're just going to keep story-boarding,'
" he said with a characteristic laugh, "My answer is, 'Yes, it's what
I've always wanted to do, and I want to get better at it.' "


A longtime resident of Marin County, Ranft is survived by his wife,
Sue, and their children, Jordan and Sophia. A memorial service will be
held Sunday at 2 p.m. at Mill Valley Community Center, 180 Camino
Alto, Mill Valley.


_________________
Rev. Dr. Frederick J. Freelance, Ph.D., Th.D., D.F.S


 
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King Bushwich the 33rd
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 10, 2005
Posts: 1168
From: Ling Cod Beach, CA 90803
Posted: 2005-08-18 2:17 pm   Permalink

Esther Wong- Owner of Madam Wong's clubs in Los Angeles and Santa Monica

http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20050817/ap_on_en_mu/obit_esther_wong_2

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mrsmiley
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 03, 2002
Posts: 3171
From: Las Vegas, NV
Posted: 2005-08-22 10:03 am   Permalink

Robert Moog, synthesizer innovator and theremin fan has passed away at age 71 in Ashville, NC.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20050822/ap_on_en_mu/obit_moog


bloop bloop wah wah zip!


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mrsmiley
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 03, 2002
Posts: 3171
From: Las Vegas, NV
Posted: 2005-08-22 10:05 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2005-08-22 10:03, mrsmiley wrote:
Robert Moog, synthesizer innovator and theremin fan has passed away at age 71 in Ashville, NC.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20050822/ap_on_en_mu/obit_moog


bloop bloop wah wah zip!




I like this part "Keyboardist Walter (later Wendy) Carlos demonstrated the range of Moog's synthesizer by recording the hit album "Switched-On Bach" in 1968 using only the new instrument instead of an orchestra." No "Walter" didn't get a sex change operation. Wendy was born Wendy but recorded as "Walter" because she didn't think a woman musician would be taken seriously!
_________________
I'm the most thirstiesterest of all!
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If you like it, it is ZAZZ! If you don't it is RAZZ!


 
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PapeToaTane
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 19, 2005
Posts: 518
From: Hyderabad, India
Posted: 2005-08-22 10:50 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2005-08-22 10:05, mrsmiley wrote:
Quote:

On 2005-08-22 10:03, mrsmiley wrote:
Robert Moog, synthesizer innovator and theremin fan has passed away at age 71 in Ashville, NC.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20050822/ap_on_en_mu/obit_moog


bloop bloop wah wah zip!




I like this part "Keyboardist Walter (later Wendy) Carlos demonstrated the range of Moog's synthesizer by recording the hit album "Switched-On Bach" in 1968 using only the new instrument instead of an orchestra." No "Walter" didn't get a sex change operation. Wendy was born Wendy but recorded as "Walter" because she didn't think a woman musician would be taken seriously!




Not true. Walter/Wendy Carlos' sex-change operation was widely publicized and was one of the very first. I was a fan then, and now. Circa 1967. See:

http://www.who2.com/wendycarlos.html

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