FEATURES | MUSIC | BOOKS | DRINKS | FORUMS | GAMES | LINKS | ABOUT


advertise on Tiki Central

Celebrating classic and modern Polynesian Pop
  [Edit Profile]  [Edit Preferences]  [Search] [Sign Up]
[Personal Messages]  [Member List]  [Help/FAQ]  [Rules]  [Login]
Tiki Central Forums Bilge 1969 Woodstock Festival anniversary....again!
1969 Woodstock Festival anniversary....again!
donhonyc
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 13, 2003
Posts: 1173
From: The Quiet EAST Village
Posted: 2005-08-22 09:05 am   Permalink

Well, at this point they should just make a national holiday out of the three days in August 1969, that the Woodstock festival took place. I am bringing this up because of the hideous and sometimes laughable presentation of the 1970 documentary 'Woodstock' that VH1 Classic has been showing over the past couple of days as part of their 'Movies That Rock' series.

Hideous because of their choice to show the 'pan and scan' version that was sized to fit TV screens back in the day. 'Pan and Scan' was a format used to show widescreen films on television before the technology was developed to show 'letterboxed' (black space on top and bottom of the image) to replicate the way the film was shown in theaters. Letterboxing is now the standard. You see it all the time on Turner Classic Films, Fox Movie Channel, IFC, etc. 'Woodstock' was not only a widescreen film, but most of it was shown splitscreen, making it even more crucial for the audience to see the full screen. With the technology today AND the 'Woodstock' DVD that is available in the widescreen version in stores, WHY did VH1 show this film (one of the top grossers of 1970) in the old 'pan and scan' format? It's also laughable because of the way VH1 dealt with the brief nudity in parts of the film, pixelating tits and asses so they could't be visible on TV. So much for the sexual revolution!

I actually have the 'Woodstock' directors cut DVD and it is an amazing film. This time around watching it, it seemed that now more than ever 'the more things change the more the stay the same'. Alot of 'kids' in the film (all probably now in their 50s and 60s) look very similar in style to the kids today. You couldn't really say that in the 80s, could you?

Over the years I have heard alot of what I've found to be unecessary mocking of what happened back then with the youth and popular culture. Some of the mocking, actually is definitely justified, but I think there is too much emphasis on the drug use and 'spaced-out hippie' vibe. At least people, young people that is, had a sense of what was going on around them, and were willing to speak up about what they thought was wrong, and at least TRIED to make a difference no matter how idealistic other people thought it was. And even though alot of kids today may LOOK like they were in that field in '69, they certainly don't mobilize themselves like they did back then, and with all that's happening in the world today that will effect them now and in the future, you just have to say that that's a damn shame.

[ This Message was edited by: donhonyc 2005-08-22 09:45 ]


 
View Profile of donhonyc Send a personal message to donhonyc      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
thejab
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 2986
From: Tradewinds Apartments, Alameda, CA
Posted: 2005-08-22 11:23 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2005-08-22 09:05, donhonyc wrote:
Over the years I have heard alot of what I've found to be unecessary mocking of what happened back then with the youth and popular culture. Some of the mocking, actually is definitely justified, but I think there is too much emphasis on the drug use and 'spaced-out hippie' vibe. At least people, young people that is, had a sense of what was going on around them, and were willing to speak up about what they thought was wrong, and at least TRIED to make a difference no matter how idealistic other people thought it was. And even though alot of kids today may LOOK like they were in that field in '69, they certainly don't mobilize themselves like they did back then, and with all that's happening in the world today that will effect them now and in the future, you just have to say that that's a damn shame.

[ This Message was edited by: donhonyc 2005-08-22 09:45 ]



I agree with part of your statement donhonyc, in that today's youth don't mobilize themselves as much to effect change and it's a shame (although many young people are active in environmental and civil-rights groups these days), but I believe that a vast majority of the folks in the "hippie" scene and at Woodstock were into it for social reasons - to fit in, meet people, get drugs, have sex, and hear music - rather then for political reasons. Not that there is anything wrong with those motivations; they are what youth is all about! But why don't they just admit that they wanted to party?

The "hippie" generation is constantly putting their scene and era up on some pedestal, when in reality they were NOT able to stop the Vietnam war (it in fact got worse in the early 70s), increase civil rights (most of these accomplishments were in the 1950's and early 60s), or influence political or social change to any great extent (without getting into a political discussion just look at what has happened in the past few years). The only success story that some of them contributed to was the women's rights movement.

I don't think the "hippie" era needs any defending against criticism. I feel that the media (especially the music media) gives them too much positive attention already.

Listen to the Mothers of Invention's album "We're Only in it For the Money" (a great parody of Sgt. Pepper's and much better and funnier IMO) from 1967 for an interesting alternative viewpoint of the Summer of Love.


 
View Profile of thejab Send a personal message to thejab  Goto the website of thejab     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Thomas
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 15, 2005
Posts: 372
From: Lake Mojave
Posted: 2005-08-22 12:27 pm   Permalink

I recall some interesting parts filmed in the town. In one part, some kid calls himself (and cohorts) "freaks" and a kindly local woman says like, "Now, why would you call yourself that? You're not freaks." "Yes we are, at least that how everyone sees us." "Oh, no you're not, you shouldn't call yourself such a thing..." (I'm paraphrasing big-time.) The point to me was that the kid was actually hung-up on a rather rigid, defensive point of view, and the older lady was in fact much more broad-minded.

There is another point when locals are basically saying, "Oh, the kids are fine, very courteous, we're not having any problems..." but then one guy disagrees: "Well, I don't like it one bit. Not one bit. (Camera zooms on his agitated face.) THEY'RE ALL ON POT!!" I found it so funny, and still do.

BTW, speaking of social change and the lack thereof, isn't it amazing that now that those "kids" are in the driver's seat here in the US, so to speak, marijuana remains criminalized? No politics here, just -- wow, you might've thought...


 
View Profile of Thomas Send a personal message to Thomas      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
donhonyc
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 13, 2003
Posts: 1173
From: The Quiet EAST Village
Posted: 2005-08-22 4:35 pm   Permalink

"I believe that a vast majority of the folks in the "hippie" scene and at Woodstock were into it for social reasons - to fit in, meet people, get drugs, have sex, and hear music - rather then for political reasons. Not that there is anything wrong with those motivations; they are what youth is all about! But why don't they just admit that they wanted to party?"

Yeah, I hear you. Totally agree. "Alice's Restaurant" was on the Sundance Channel the other night, and while it''s a pretty cool little relic from back then, I kinda cringe during certain parts. I'm not saying every person of that generation was socially/politically aware. Lots of them were just 'along for the ride' as my Uncle says. He was of the age then, and couldn't give a sh*t either away about politics, just basically partying his ass off all the time. But where did we get 'sex, drugs, and rock n roll' from? Definitely them, no doubt. So I'm not sure they were always trying to hide beind their political self righteousness.


"The "hippie" generation is constantly putting their scene and era up on some pedestal, when in reality they were NOT able to stop the Vietnam war (it in fact got worse in the early 70s), increase civil rights (most of these accomplishments were in the 1950's and early 60s), or influence political or social change to any great extent (without getting into a political discussion just look at what has happened in the past few years). The only success story that some of them contributed to was the women's rights movement."


Mmmm...Yeah...Look, I'm fairly educated as far as American history goes, but there are others who are definitely more up on it than I am, that's for sure. Maybe you're right on a more specific level about giving too much credit to the 60s youth, but let's face it..they WERE the anti-war movement, and they did have a part in changing peoples minds, and stopping that war. But, my point, generally speaking is that, at the very least it seems that they were more educated, active, and committed to doing 'something' constructive whether or not they played a huge part in Civil Rights, etc.

"I don't think the "hippie" era needs any defending against criticism. I feel that the media (especially the music media) gives them too much positive attention already."

I don't necessarily agree or disagree. But what do you mean the music media gives them too much attention. Maybe you mean the music industry gives them too much attention. Whatever the case, I just find it a little annoying..for lack of a better word..when that era is defined by pot, tie-dye, headbands, and bloodshot eyes. No question about it, that did happen. But for example their icons were Dylan, The Beatles, Hendrix, etc. Today's icon for youth is a silouhetted dancing hipster for iPod. And I also think that people have a tendency to forget about The Weather Underground, SDS, The Yippies, The East Village Other, The Diggers, and other youth community/activist groups, newspapers, radio stations, etc. Okay...maybe their plans failed, in fact most of them did. But as I said before, effort was put forth. Maybe the Weather Underground is a bad example to include here. Were they militant , pissed, and unnessarily destructive? Yes. Were they knuckleheads? No.

"Listen to the Mothers of Invention's album "We're Only in it For the Money" (a great parody of Sgt. Pepper's and much better and funnier IMO) from 1967 for an interesting alternative viewpoint of the Summer of Love."

That is one of my all-time favorite records. Total masterpiece. But I don't think Zappa was parodying Sgt. Pepper as much as he was paradying the 'phony hippies' and all that. Parodying the Sgt. Pepper cover, yeah. But as far as I know he and John Lennon mutually respected each other as musicians.

"oh my hair is getting good in the back"/ "I will love everyone. I will love the police as they kick the shit out of me on the street"

Yeah...every generation has it's poseurs, and the hippies were no exception. Kinda reminds me of what it's like right now in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. I haven't seen a bigger bunch of pompous posuers like that in years. But as far as say San Francisco, remember what George Harrison said after his surprise visit to Haight/Ashbury? I don't remember the quote, but it was something like "look, if your going to drop out of society..do something with your time. don't just sleep in the park and get high all the time" or something like that.


 
View Profile of donhonyc Send a personal message to donhonyc      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
thejab
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 2986
From: Tradewinds Apartments, Alameda, CA
Posted: 2005-08-22 5:00 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2005-08-22 16:35, donhonyc wrote:
"Listen to the Mothers of Invention's album "We're Only in it For the Money" (a great parody of Sgt. Pepper's and much better and funnier IMO) from 1967 for an interesting alternative viewpoint of the Summer of Love."

That is one of my all-time favorite records. Total masterpiece. But I don't think Zappa was parodying Sgt. Pepper as much as he was paradying the 'phony hippies' and all that. Parodying the Sgt. Pepper cover, yeah. But as far as I know he and John Lennon mutually respected each other as musicians.



You're right, the cover was a parody more then the content was.

"What's there to live for?
Who needs the peace corps?
Think I'll just DROP OUT
I'll go to Frisco
Buy a wig & sleep
On Owsley's floor

Walked past the wig store
Danced at the Fillmore
I'm completely stoned
I'm hippy & I'm trippy
I'm a gypsy on my own
I'll stay a week & get the crabs &
Take a bus back home
I'm really just a phony
But forgive me
'Cause I'm stoned

Every town must have a place
Where phony hippies meet
Psychedelic dungeons
Popping up on every street
GO TO SAN FRANCISCO . . .

How I love ya, How I love ya
How I love ya, How I love ya Frisco!
How I love ya, How I love ya
How I love ya, How I love ya
Oh, my hair is getting good in the back!

Every town must have a place
Where phony hippies meet
Psychedelic dungeons
Popping up on every street
GO TO SAN FRANCISCO . . .

Hotcha!

First I'll buy some beads
And then perhaps a leather band
To go around my head
Some feathers and bells
And a book of Indian lore
I will ask the Chamber Of Commerce
How to get to Haight Street
And smoke an awful lot of dope
I will wander around barefoot
I will have a psychedelic gleam in my eye at all times
I will love everyone
I will love the police as they kick the shit out of me on the street
I will sleep . . .
I will, I will go to a house
That's, that's what I will do
I will go to a house
Where there's a rock & roll band
'Cause the groups all live together
And I will join a rock & roll band
I will be their road manager
And I will stay there with them
And I will get the crabs
But I won't care
Because . . ."


 
View Profile of thejab Send a personal message to thejab  Goto the website of thejab     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
alohabros
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Feb 04, 2004
Posts: 533
From: westernus
Posted: 2005-08-22 6:29 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2005-08-22 09:05, donhonyc wrote:
... It's also laughable because of the way VH1 dealt with the brief nudity in parts of the film, pixelating tits and asses so they could't be visible on TV. So much for the sexual revolution!

...69, they certainly don't mobilize themselves like they did back then, and with all that's happening in the world today that will effect them now and in the future, you just have to say that that's a damn shame.

[ This Message was edited by: donhonyc 2005-08-22 09:45 ]



... yeah, a damn shame, laughable and all that... just show the goods parts... less briefs, more nudity...

...did you mean pixie tits & asses...

c'mon vh1, or bet or mtv (1 or 2), get it together and serve what the folks want, need and deserve... and work so hard to stumble towards...

...did you really mean pixie tits & asses...


 
View Profile of alohabros Send a personal message to alohabros      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
donhonyc
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 13, 2003
Posts: 1173
From: The Quiet EAST Village
Posted: 2005-08-22 6:42 pm   Permalink


"c'mon vh1, or bet or mtv (1 or 2), get it together and serve what the folks want, need and deserve... and work so hard to stumble towards... "

Hold on a sec...you're guy they silhouette in the iPod ad, right?

"...did you really mean pixie tits & asses..."

Like I said 'pixelated' tits and asses. I think maybe your fixated on the band The Pixies' tits and asses.

Psst...maybe you should stumble back to that wanted, needed, and deserved mtv & vh1.






 
View Profile of donhonyc Send a personal message to donhonyc      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
alohabros
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Feb 04, 2004
Posts: 533
From: westernus
Posted: 2005-08-23 08:26 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2005-08-22 18:42, donhonyc wrote:

...Hold on a sec...you're guy they silhouette in the iPod ad, right?




... was one of the guys in one of the ipod ads... the silhouette was someone else... never got the name, though...


 
View Profile of alohabros Send a personal message to alohabros      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
U-Moderate:
  
v1.5

[ About Tiki Central | Contact Tiki Central | Advertise on Tiki Central ]
(c) 2000-2014 Tikiroom.com (tm), Tiki Central (tm)

Credits & copyright infomation