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Hawaii Vacation Tips
hiltiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 10, 2004
Posts: 2980
From: Reseda, calif.
Posted: 2004-06-22 9:19 pm   Permalink

I was at Waikiki beach a month ago. We stayed at The Royal Hawaiian. It was fabulous, I think I had several mai tais at least twice a day. That was preety much all I was able to do. I had the best time. Do I sound like an alchy?

 
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tikiyaki
Grand Member (7 years)  

Joined: May 18, 2004
Posts: 2696
From: The Exotic Port of REDONDO BEACH, CA
Posted: 2004-06-23 6:50 pm   Permalink

Hey, I posted this same question a month ago. I'm glad to see more answers, as I'm leaving for my Big Island vacation in 5 days.
One question...are there local artists carving and selling tikis in the marketplace areas ?
Also...are the prices on tapa cheaper there than here?
I went to Da Show and the tapas were semi reasonably priced, but I wonder if the deals are better in Hawaii.



 
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dogbytes
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Mar 24, 2002
Posts: 2241
From: seattle, wa
Posted: 2004-06-23 7:07 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2004-06-23 18:50, tikiyaki wrote:

One question...are there local artists carving and selling tikis in the marketplace areas ?
Also...are the prices on tapa cheaper there than here?



on oahu: fake "artists" trying to pass off mass produced tikis as their own at the Marketplace. they 'carve' a log into matchsticks or, my favorite, the guy who just bonks the cement with a piece of bamboo to create the sounds of carving.
found a real tiki artist at the swap meet ~ our very own Gecko
didnt see any tapas.

found nothing on kauai, but really didnt expect to!


 
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Tiki Bird
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Sep 25, 2003
Posts: 850
From: Cerritos, Ca.
Posted: 2004-06-24 10:33 am   Permalink

Geez, I tickets to Hawaii are goin up fast! Plannin on going in late sept. Thanks to everyone contributing to this thread, its made alot easier to plan my vacation.



tbird.


 
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tikiyaki
Grand Member (7 years)  

Joined: May 18, 2004
Posts: 2696
From: The Exotic Port of REDONDO BEACH, CA
Posted: 2004-06-24 9:11 pm   Permalink

Geez, I tickets to Hawaii are goin up fast! Plannin on going in late sept. Thanks to everyone contributing to this thread, its made alot easier to plan my vacation. >>

I went through Expedia.com and got a pretty damn good deal. They were the best I found.

Try them.


 
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Kailuageoff
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 27, 2002
Posts: 1497
From: Honolulu Lounge,Lewes, DE
Posted: 2004-06-25 1:41 pm   Permalink

I paid $100 for a 4' x 6' piece of Fijian style tapa at Polynesian Cultural Center. We didn't see real tapa cloth for sale anywhere else on the island. PCC also had the best carvings we saw, although they were expensive. The tikis in the International Marketplace were mostly crude, mass produced pagan idols; except for the ones that still adorn the shopping area -- which are priceless artifacts of tikidom.


 
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Jungle Trader
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2003
Posts: 3729
From: Trader's Jungle Outpost, Turlock, Ca.
Posted: 2004-07-04 12:40 am   Permalink


View from our room at the Westin Maui Ka'anapali Resort


Snorkeling at Molokini and Turtle Arches (Must see)


Day hike at Mokamokaole Valley


Our guide Kahi lending a hand to wife at real waterfall


Wife doing disappearing act inside waterfall, note the outstretched hand and arm


Kirk da' Surf in Honolua Bay


Real natives at the PCC


Find da' lizard game


Find da' real Lizard Man Gecko at La Mariana with me and my nephews who also live on Oahu. Thanks Gecko!

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[ This Message was edited by: Jungle Trader on 2004-07-04 00:53 ]


 
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christiki295
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 09, 2003
Posts: 3769
From: LA-2547 mls east Hawaii &5500 Easter Is
Posted: 2004-07-13 7:57 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2004-06-25 13:41, Kailuageoff wrote:
The tikis in the International Marketplace were mostly crude, mass produced pagan idols; except for the ones that still adorn the shopping area -- which are priceless artifacts of tikidom.



Curious, I purchased a handcarved tiki from someone who had just finished carving it - based upon the wood remains in front of him on the floor.

However, I didn't seen any tikis adorning the shopping area, although I did like the water fountain in front.


 
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Tikiwahine
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 09, 2003
Posts: 3288
From: Ontario, Canada
Posted: 2004-07-13 8:40 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2004-07-13 19:57, christiki295 wrote:
Quote:

On 2004-06-25 13:41, Kailuageoff wrote:
The tikis in the International Marketplace were mostly crude, mass produced pagan idols; except for the ones that still adorn the shopping area -- which are priceless artifacts of tikidom.



Curious, I purchased a handcarved tiki from someone who had just finished carving it - based upon the wood remains in front of him on the floor.

However, I didn't seen any tikis adorning the shopping area, although I did like the water fountain in front.



I have my suspicions. I was there last week and saw a fellow 'carving' a chunk of wood. It had a slight tiki look to it. The tikis he had for sale were the same as the mass produced ones everywhere, and I didn't see anything that looked like it had been carved that day. (they all had the same finish) I assumed that this was his scam, he trys to make people think that he carved them. (I could of course be wrong though!)

That fountain was very cool! Was it the one with the koi, New Guinea mask and dozens of orchids growing around?
_________________

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tikiyaki
Grand Member (7 years)  

Joined: May 18, 2004
Posts: 2696
From: The Exotic Port of REDONDO BEACH, CA
Posted: 2004-07-13 11:59 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2002-05-16 12:02, Tiki Chris wrote:
Quote:




There is also an Uncle Billy's hotel in Hilo that I spent a few days at. It was cheap but very nice with a central garden with ponds full of koi and our room had a lanai that looked out over the lava rock gardens (with old rotting tikis) next to the hotel and beyond to Hilo Bay. They had some tiki mugs in the gift shop for sale and you could get drinks in ceramic bamboo mugs in the bar.




can't vouch for the accomodation at uncle billy's in hilo, but i gotta recommend the free hula show and the bar w/ the giant pineapplde hanging from it!

>>

My Uncle Billy's experience was unfortunately not pleasant. I went to the restaurant in Hilo. It was July 4th, and the day after my girlfriend's birthday. Being that we spent her birthday doing the exausting hike to see the lava flow (amazing!) I wanted to treat her to a special birthday dinner.
We got there at 6-ish and the restaurant was half full, and they couldn't seat anyone else because they were "slammed". After waiting 1/2 an hour to be seated, we waited another 15 to get our order taken.
We watched the Polynesian show, which was ok. I had arranged with the hostess to have the band sing Happy Birthday to my girl with a cake and the whole deal...well...it never happened. It took 30 minutes for my girlfriend to get her Mai Tai, and an hour to get our food.
By the time we were finished eating, the band finished and there was no birthday ANYTHING. They totally snubbed me. From the time we entered the place until the time we left, we'd spent nearly 3 hours. We also missed some of the fireworks going on outside.
There seemed to be enough staff to handle the 30 or so people in the restaurant, but the place is SO poorly run, they couldn't even handle it. By the time we left, there was maybe 2 other tables with people.

So, needless to say, Uncle Billy's is on my shitlist. I totally appreciated the 50's old Polynesian charm of the place, but with service as bad as it was that night, I will never go back. I also will never stay at any of his hotels, which, the locals tell me, I shouldn't do anyway.
When in Hilo, I highly recommend the Hawaii Naniloa Hotel...right next door to Uncle Billy's. It's nice and VERY inexpensive. I stayed there for $69 a night !


 
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christiki295
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 09, 2003
Posts: 3769
From: LA-2547 mls east Hawaii &5500 Easter Is
Posted: 2004-07-29 8:42 pm   Permalink

Oahu Recommendations:

BISHOP MUSEUM

Currently featuring the "Ku" exhibition. It is the point of connection with the historical Hawaiian tiki gods. Possibly the only place on earth where original wooden tikis persevere.

ASTON WAIKIKI BEACH HOTEL

Located at the end of the strip, it features colorful, but small rooms. It also features free breakfast, which can be had on the balcony overlooking the beach or bags are provided for the quick walk across the street to the ocean.

There is also Hula poolside, at breakfast time.

TIKI'S BAR & GRILL

Tiki's @ the Aston Waiki Beach Hotel is a must see & do. The bar scene is happening and the cuisine is delicious. Tikis abound as do Shag prints and even Gecko has an Easter Island inspired carving on the outside wall.

A photo of Tikis is here:
Link to Photo

Tiki's has two 8-1/2 foot tiki at the entrance, eight tiki on the back walls of the dining room, a 3-1/2 foot tiki head named “Hibiscus Tiki” in the bar area, and a 6-1/2 foot, one-of-a-kind hula tiki in the central dining area.

Tiki’s also has palm wood flooring, fish nets hanging from the ceiling with starfish and shells, glass balls, plus 50 hand-carved masks, statues and war clubs from different regions around the Pacific.

POLYNESIAN CULTURAL CENTER

I was disappointed in the tours, with the exception of Samoa, but not in the shows and not in the abundance of tikis. The early afternoon boat parade is very fun and features hula & other dancing on barges which cruise the river.

The evening show Horizons is spectacular. It features chanting, taditional Hawaiian hula, Tahitian hula and fire dancing.

The luau is definitely worth the price, although cocktails are not served and I forgot to BYOB at Foodland.

The village tours feature more comedy and crowd participation and only incidentally provide a few facts about the particular South Pacific nation.

Tikis abound. Worth it for the tikis alone!

TURTLE BAY RESORT

Now famous as the location for the TV show the Northshore, Turtle Bay is diametrically opposite of Waikiki because it is not crowded, it features grassy lanais, not concrete sidewalks and the sun sets directly over the water.

However, the Northshore is countrylike, there is not much to do at night, except have cocktails on the sand while looking at the stars and enjoying the tradewinds, which is not bad. Treat yourself to one of the cottages.

DOLE PLANTATION

The gardens are spectacular. So much color everywhere. The display of pineapples is eye-opening - I never knew there were red pineapples!

The train ride is informative, although very, very sanitized. For example, in a glaring ommission, the tour failed to acknowledge that Dole stole Hawaii from the monarchy and then imprisoned the queen.

BRUNCH - ORCHIDS @ HALEKULANI

Very gracious, very beautiful presentation of cuisine, not hurried and a wide selection of appetizing selections.

GIOVANNI'S SHRIMP TRUCK

A North Shore institution. When you see the bumbersticker that says "Tikientertainment.com," you know you are at the right place.

So much garlic, it one can smell it when drinving by. A dozen shrimp & rice for $9.00!

[ Edited by Humuhumu to fix overly long link ]

[ This Message was edited by: Humuhumu on 2004-07-30 01:59 ]

[ This Message was edited by: christiki295 on 2004-07-30 10:14 ]

[ This Message was edited by: christiki295 on 2004-08-17 19:12 ]


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Kim
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Feb 24, 2003
Posts: 135
From: Portland, OR
Posted: 2004-08-01 10:53 pm   Permalink

Tikitronic & I just this minute purchased our plane ticket for our belated Hawaii honeymoon in November! Eeeeee! This thread has been a great inspiration!
_________________
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Tiki Kon V: Venture into Darkness
Visit
http://www.tikikon.com for more information.

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dogbytes
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Mar 24, 2002
Posts: 2241
From: seattle, wa
Posted: 2004-08-17 10:11 am   Permalink

i've been meaning to post this:

Island of Kauai (Nov 2003)

Thurday: We arrived about noon, but what with picking up the car and registering at the hotel it was 2 before we had lunch. Chose the A-1 BBQ in Lihue (very obvious as you head toward Popiu from the airport), a converted fast-food restaurant serving plate lunch and Chinese food. There’s a steam table, but we skipped that and ordered from the menu. I had the seafood combo plate lunch; breaded mahi and shrimp with short ribs (there’s a choice of meat, that was mine) with rice and mac salad. The mahi was good but the shrimp breading was overly doughy and the short ribs were too sweet and too fatty. My husband had Chinese, beef with green beans, also served plate-lunch style with rice and mac salad, and his was much better than mine.

For dinner we went to Lawai Restaurant (on Hwy 50 almost 3 miles west of the junction with Hwy 520, it’s next to a 7-11). Real dive of a plate-lunch place, menu is on a chalkboard and hard to figure out. The ginger-fried chicken was excellent, a big portion of all dark meat with a crisp, slightly sweet crust; my husband’s teriyaki pork was good but streaked with a bit too much gristle. Both were served as plate lunch, the mac salad was better than at A-1 and the steamed rice just right.

Friday: Our Hyatt package came with their breakfast buffet, which is worth paying for at all the Hawaiian Hyatts we’ve visited. This isn’t a grand brunch (except on Sundays), there’s no chef carving prime rib or making crepes, but there is a wide selection of excellent fresh fruit (sweet strawberries no matter what the season), wonderful fresh-baked pastries and croissants, fresh tropical juices, good coffee, cheeses, smoked salmon, plus hot breakfast selections including (on this particular day) two sorts of eggs, bacon, sausage links, corned beef hash, hash browns, french toast, and bread pudding, all of it really good. Also steamed rice and miso soup with fixings (seaweed, tofu, shredded bonito, etc.) presumably meant for Japanese guests but which I really like to include in my breakfast. We experienced the “free” Hyatt buffet during a previous stay and ended up stuffing ourselves every morning and then collapsing in our room until noon, but this time we managed to be a little more conservative.

Drove up to Hanalei after that, stopping at a number of shops along the way. Tincan Man’s in Kapaa and Yellowfish Trading Co. in Hanalei both had some interesting artifacts, but at premium prices. (The lighthouse at Kilauea Point is well worth seeing too, great views.) Ate a late lunch at Hanalei Mixed Plate; okay, first off, serving something alongside a scoop of rice should not allow you to call it a “plate lunch”. Plate lunch has to come with something in addition to rice; macaroni salad or potato salad or at least coleslaw. Second, they’re nice people, gave us a taste of the kahlua pork (which was enough to decide to avoid it), and they serve big piles of food, *but* . . . the ginger shoyu chicken was bland and the vegetable chow mein even blander. It wasn’t horrible, but it wasted an opportunity to have truly good food.

After driving all the way back to our hotel we were pretty tired, so we just went to Popiu Tropical Burgers for dinner. They stuck to the state law about cooking burgers no less than medium well, despite our wink and nod to the waitress. I had the Popeye (spinach, swiss, and bacon plus the usual lettuce/tomato/pickle), my husband had some-weird-name burger (Portuguese sausage, broiled pineapple, plum-pineapple BBQ sauce), both good but in no way exceptional; same with the fries. The banana milkshake was disappointing and should have come with an advisory saying, “no live bananas were harmed in the making of this milkshake.”

Saturday: Spent the day checking out local charity bazaars (nothing worth talking about) and driving west along the south coast. Lihue and Hanapepe are both full of galleries and “curio” shops with overpriced stuff. We did see a number of freestanding tikis at various shops and restaurants along the way, like at Giorgio’s Gallery and Big Braddah’s Takeout.

First food stop was the Omoide Deli/Wong’s Chinese Restaurant in Hanapepe (on Hwy 50). Had a slice of their “famous” lillikoi chiffon pie which was terrific and ought to be famous, also a “cream square” (cream puff-type custard in a wonderful light puff pastry). Saw someone having the crispy fried gau gee mein, which looked so good we came back later that night for dinner; at this point in time (November) the restaurant portion wasn’t open, though, you have to order food from the deli (you can still sit in the restaurant, just no table service). The chow mein, saimin, duck with noodles, and other noodle dishes are done fresh; the gau gee mein we ordered had vegetables, char siu, and chicken over soft chow mein noodles, topped with four large gau gee (mild ground pork in fried won ton skins). The other entrees are from a steam table, but they were recently cooked and good (the shrimp with green beans had fresh green beans), served in large portions, and came with either rice, vegetable chow mein, or half of each. This was a definite find; cheap, big, tasty food.

Stepping back in time to lunch, we stopped at the Waimea Bakery to share a teriyaki ahi sandwich (after breakfast and then the pie, we weren’t too hungry). The sandwich was great, a fine, delicate hunk of fish on wonderful fresh-baked bread. Came with corn chips from a bag, however. Later, on the way back from our trip, we stopped at the other bakery we had seen; Thrifty Bakery (next to Thrifty Mart) on Hwy 50 between Waimea and Hanapepe. Had apple and coconut pastries (looked like Chinese moon cakes, but weren’t), quite good.

Before dinner we had cocktails on the Seaview Terrace at the Hyatt; there’s live entertainment and a great sunset. I was feeling a little hungry so we ordered the Hawaiian nachos. For $10 I was expecting a little plate of nice nachos; instead we got a large dinner plate piled high with great nachos; a mix of corn, blue corn, and flour tortilla chips (all made at the hotel), topped with sour cream, cheese, guacamole, etc. plus big hunks of kahlua pork. Pretty much a meal-sized appetizer, it prevented us from finishing our gau gee mein that night .

Sunday: Lunch was at Duane’s Ono Char Burger (Hwy 56 near Anahola, drive-up with outdoor seating only); the “old-fashioned” burger, shrimp basket with fries, and onion rings were all competent but not special. The marionberry milkshake was very nice, thick and creamy.

After hiking and sightseeing we went for cocktails to Tahiti Nui in Hanalei. Tahiti Nui used to be a restaurant, but now only the bar is open (the current owners are trying to open a new place (with the old decor?) at the Hanalei Colony Resort, a good ways down Hwy 560 past Hanalei town). The bar still seems to have its original interior (the barstool pedestals are all tikis), but it has devolved into a run-of-the-mill bar otherwise; sports blasting from a big TV, the bartender couldn’t find any coconut creme to make a pina colada, and the mai tai was rum and pineapple juice (though decent rum and pineapple juice, I have to admit).

For dinner we stopped at A Pacific Cafe (yes, “A” not “The”) in Kapaa. It’s in the Kauai Village mall and looks totally nondescript from outside and not all that interesting inside, and a number of people turned away after looking at the prices on the menu (not cheap). The wok-seared mahi and the blackened opa were both top-notch, however, and the “Toasted Hawaiian” (white chocolate cake with haupia layer and caramel sauce) was delicious.

Monday: Lunch at Hamura Saimin Stand (Kress St. in Lihue, Kress is a cross-street to Rice). Hamura’s is very well-known for cheap, good eats; I don’t think anything on the menu is more than $6. Their menu is pretty limited; saimin with various things in it, fried saimin, udon, teriyaki beef sticks; counter seating only. The regular saimin was very good noodles in a light chicken broth with a little green onion, fish cake, and canned ham (maybe Spam?). The saimin with won ton had the above plus some nice stuffed won tons and char siu. The teriyaki was very thin-sliced and then cooked until it was crunchy on the edges. We split a piece of their lillikoi chiffon pie for dessert, very light and fluffy. Whole bill came to less than $12 before tip.

Dinner was at Green Garden in Hanapepe (on Hwy 50 on the right as you go west, but keep two eyes out as they’re largely hidden by vegetation). [/b]This one is a real must-do, on many fronts: 1) It’s a Kauai tradition, having been in the same spot since the 1940s 2) They have one of the best tiki-per-square foot ratios on Kauai,[/b] nearing that of Tahiti Nui; there are eight old 4 to 5 foot tikis (rescued from other places) in the “atrium” area in the front of the restaurant, three similar ones in the other front room, two smaller foot and a half to two foot tikis that are very detailed and done by the owner’s brother quite a few years back, and a few more by the bar; plus a large case full of big conch shells and such and some old furniture (a very old looking Chinese tea cart, for instance) 3) They serve full-strength mai tais in water tumblers (my husband’s face flushed red after one, and he’s not Asian) 4) All dinners come with an all-you-can-eat soup and salad bar 5) good food; we had the mixed pu pu platter (deep fried sui mai, won tons, and spring rolls), followed by the “Chinese plate” for me (battered fried shrimp, char siu, spare ribs, chicken chow mein, and fried rice; I used to work at a Cantonese restaurant, um, we’ll just say “not recently”, and this meal was a real blast from the past, though the spare ribs were fatty) while my husband had the ono (charbroiled with butter and a little garlic, served with choice of potato (mashed or fries) or rice) which was simple, fresh, and tasty 6) they bake their own pies, we shared a piece of chocolate cream which was great 7) very reasonable, the whole meal (two cocktails, appetizer, two entrees, two coffees and one dessert) came to $55. Again, a must-do on Kauai.

Tuesday: When we visited Kauai ten years ago the bell captain at our hotel recommended a restaurant which was a really local, family place in an out-of-the-way industrial corner of Lihue. We couldn’t remember the name or exactly where it was, but he thought it was in the area near Hamura’s Saimin. To make a long story short, we went to Ma’s Family Restaurant (4277 Halenani, around the corner from Hamura’s) for lunch. It wasn’t the same restaurant; Ma’s has only served breakfast (though it serves it till 1:30) for decades, and the one we remember had dinner. My husband ordered fried noodles (yakisoba) and teriyaki beef, I had fried rice and eggs; good, fresh-made fried rice, but the eggs were over-easy when I ordered them over-hard. Ma, who’s 89, cooked the food and served us, then sat at our table and talked with us (we were the only ones there for lunch, as I said they really only serve breakfast). Total bill came to $12 before tip. Very local.

(Never did find the restaurant my husband remembered, probably it’s gone now.)

I felt like buying some pastries after lunch. Stopped at Lihue Bakery and Coffee Shop first; bought a cream eclair and an apple turnover, both of which started leaking grease through the paper bag immediately; didn’t eat more than a bite of either one. Then tried the Kauai Bakery (at the Kukui Grove shopping center) and bought a cinnamon roll; not bad but nothing special.

For dinner we went to Oki Diner and Bakery (Kuhio Hwy in Lihue), another very local place. I like meals which give you lots of choices, and this place did great at that; meals start out with cornbread (sweet and buttery) with chips and salsa (packaged and ordinary), followed by your choice of mac-potato salad or a green salad; we both had combination dinners, which include both rice and fried noodles (yakisoba, very good), with choice of two entrees, so by sharing we got to taste four of the offerings. Neil’s chicken was chunks cooked in a sweetish-spicy teriyaki; teriyaki fried chicken was deep-fried with a slightly-sweet breading; chicken katsu was typical breaded chicken; and mahi-mahi was served in a thick butter beurre. The first two of these were quite good, the katsu was average, but the fish had a surprisingly strong (and unpleasant) flavor for mahi that the sauce didn’t entirely mask. Dinner also came with dessert, fairly good Dutch apple or custard pie. Lots of food. Total bill was $20.


Wednesday: The Shrimp Station (Hwy 50 in Waimea) is a drive-in place that features (what else) shrimp. The shrimp (soft) taco started with a burrito-size flour tortilla, making it enormous for a taco; the filling was mostly shredded lettuce and cheese with bay shrimp almost as an afterthought, rather disappointing at $6. The chips and salsa it came with, though, were both home-made and excellent. The coconut shrimp on the other hand was a deal even at $11, about a dozen jumbo shrimp coated with a tasty batter including lots of toasted coconut, served in a basket over pretty good fries (though if you can talk them into substituting a side of chips and salsa for the fries you definitely should).

For dinner we went to Tidepools at the Hyatt. Pricey, but great food in a wonderful atmosphere, like an open lanai with palapas and tikis. French onion soup and a baby romaine salad with goat cheese to start were very good; I had opa stuffed with crabmeat and shittake mushrooms over asparagus, my husband had Chinese-style steamed “snapper” (not further identified, but a very tasty piece of fish) which came with noodles and rice, both excellent. We had the Mudslide (ice cream cake with homemade cookie “crusts”) for dessert, also really good.

Thurday: Here’s a find courtesy of Lydia, our breakfast waitress at the Hyatt: Mark’s Restaurant (from Hwy 50 at the Kauai Community College take Puhi Rd. away from the college toward the Puhi Industrial Park; turn right on Hanalima, then right on Haleukana (basically after the first building you see on Hanalima); 1610 Haleukana St.). This is a new restaurant/catering business started by the former executive chef at the Sheraton, who teaches cooking at the college. No inside seating, basically serves just plate lunch and bento; I had the daily special combo, two large tempura shrimp, teriyaki steak, and teriyaki fried chicken, while my husband had “Mark’s famous mixed plate”, beef stew, teriyaki beef, and chicken katsu. Both came with rice, mac salad, and fried noodles, neither cost more than $7.

I envied the ono my husband had on Monday at Green Garden so much that we returned there for Thursday dinner. I asked for extra garlic and it came just as I hoped, charbroiled on the outside, firm and moist inside, and garlicky. My husband went for the teriyaki ahi this time, also very good. After eating at Tidepools, the different in portion side (about twice as much at Green Garden) and price (about $29 per entree at Tidepools vs. $19 (including soup and salad) at Green Garden) made the quality here even more impressive. Coconut cream pie for dessert, yum.

Friday: What we wanted for lunch was the Hawaiian nachos we had experienced earlier. It turned out that they only had those at the Seaview Terrace after 4 PM, however, so we settled for coconut shrimp at the poolside bar (nice but overpriced). Went to a Lappert’s for ice cream (always good).

Since this was our last night in Hawaii we went in search of opakapaka one more time. Lydia (mentioned earlier) told us that our best bet was Duke’s Canoe Club or Keoki’s Paradise (in the Poipu Shopping Village, Poipu Rd., Poipu). A call to Duke’s revealed that the fresh catch didn’t include opakapaka, so we headed to Keoki’s, where opakapaka was indeed available. Keoki’s has a nice ambience, open lanai-style dining set off by torches, palapas and bamboo, with a couple of tikis tucked away near the stairs. We had opakapaka (grilled with butter) and opah (grilled with butter with Ponzu sauce on the side), both excellent and providing an interesting comparison; both are mild white-fleshed fish, the opakapaka being more tender with a taste and feel close to lobster, while the opah was firmer with a more intense flavor. Entrees came with a small salad and herbed rice. We ended with their “hula pie”, a large wedge of macadamia ice cream pie with a chocolate wafer crumb crust, topped with a goodly amount of hot fudge, chopped macadamias, and whipped cream.


 
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weirduncletiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 26, 2002
Posts: 756
From: Grape Town, California
Posted: 2004-08-17 10:22 am   Permalink

Excellent reporting!! Mahalo for sharing your experiences.

-Weird Unc


 
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weirduncletiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 26, 2002
Posts: 756
From: Grape Town, California
Posted: 2005-06-12 5:26 pm   Permalink

Anyone have any info on Molokai? First-hand experience? Recommended guide book? Any advice? I may have the chance to head there soon and would love to hear the skinny. Of course, I'll post my thoughts when I get back. Mahalo.

-Weird Unc


 
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