FEATURES | MUSIC | BOOKS | DRINKS | FORUMS | GAMES | LINKS | ABOUT


advertise on Tiki Central

Celebrating classic and modern Polynesian Pop
  [Edit Profile]  [Edit Preferences]  [Search] [Sign Up]
[Personal Messages]  [Member List]  [Help/FAQ]  [Rules]  [Login]
Tiki Central Forums » » Tiki Drinks and Food » » Limes. . . Is it just me?
Goto page ( Previous Page 1 | 2 | 3 )
Limes. . . Is it just me?
GentleHangman
Grand Member (6 years)  

Joined: Jun 23, 2006
Posts: 462
From: Stuart, Florida
Posted: 2007-05-09 2:01 pm   Permalink

Quote:
Posted: Today; 06:59 am

GentleHangman, odd that you can't get key limes more often. Here in Orlando, my local Publix has them nearly year round.


Definitely not the situation here . . . Key Limes every so often . . . Persian limes are the norm. I'm not complaining about Persian limes in general as I use them most always for my Tiki drinks that call for fresh lime juice. Besides, in Trader Vic's own words regarding the invention of the Mai Tai . . he doesn't specify what type of lime he used but he is pretty particular about all the other ingredients. I'm guessing that he simply used the run-of-the-mill Persian lime. And, I don't recall Key limes being specified in the Grog Log or Intoxica recipes (off the top of my head anyway), simply "Always squeeze your own lime juice. The difference is crucial to the fresh, crisp, "alive' taste you're after."
Maybe the next batch I purchase locally will yield more juice per lime than my current batch.
_________________
I bet you feel more like you do now now than you did when you came in.

GENT


 
View Profile of GentleHangman Send a personal message to GentleHangman      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
GatorRob
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 20, 2004
Posts: 1770
From: 3 hrs 33 mins to paradise
Posted: 2007-05-10 11:16 am   Permalink

I've posted this before, but you all might be interested in it, regarding the use of Persian versus Key limes at the Mai-Kai.

http://www.cocktail.com/destinations/2001/MaiKaiPolynesianPotionParadise.htm

 View Profile of GatorRob Send a personal message to GatorRob      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
alohacurrent
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 16, 2006
Posts: 238
From: Sacramento
Posted: 2007-05-14 12:21 pm   Permalink

After reading this thread last week I happened to come across key limes at Costco. Something I hadn't seen there before. I bought a bag of keys and Persians for a side by side. I had not used key limes for drinks before this weekend, but if I can find them again I'll definitely buy them. I'm hooked on the little buggers. I agree they are more work and the seeds are kind of a pain, but damn they're good.

 
View Profile of alohacurrent Send a personal message to alohacurrent  Email alohacurrent     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
The Gnomon
Grand Member (7 years)  

Joined: May 01, 2007
Posts: 1290
From: MD-DC-VA
Posted: 2007-05-15 1:06 pm   Permalink

When I was a little kid I drank a lot of tea (just regular Lipton) and always had to have lime in it. I was very particular about the limes and would not let my folks or anyone else pick them out. I had to be the one to select them. I'm still the same way, but now know a lot more about them.

TMI on limes (aka everything you might never have wanted to know):

http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/tahiti_lime.html

http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/mexican_lime.html

I grew up in New England, came down to Washington to go to school and ended up staying. Being that neither area is tropical (nor close to it) there never are any local limes. Mostly, I use Tahiti/Persian/Bearss limes. Occasionally, Key/Mexican/West Indian limes will turn up in the store and I'll treat myself to the delicacy. Actually, both varieties tend to be imported from Mexico—especially, when the US crops get damaged or have a bad year.

Anyway, when I go to the store, usually the lime bin is small enough that I will inspect every lime they have and take all the best ones. I will often seek out the produce manager, ask him if he has more limes in the back, and if I can go through them all. Hopefully, I will have found, at least one good lime in his bin so I can show him what I'm looking for. I tell him that if he gives me a good price for buying a lot of them, I'll take all he has of the kind I'm showing him. Just because the sign says 3/$1 doesn't mean you can't get a better deal.

For every decent lime there are usually ten or more that seem like little green lemons. The good limes (smooth shiny skin, plump, and oval) are generally not as large as the green lemon specimins. Unless there is no other way, I won't buy limes in a netted bag. I've found that the ratio of good limes to "green lemons" is even worse in the netted bags. Often they have no decent limes inside at all.

Once you have your limes at home, as precious as they can be when they're selling at 2 or 3 or 4 for a dollar, you don't want them to go bad or dry up on you. Here are a few tips on the care and maintenance of limes:

If the skin becomes discolored or pitted it is probably being over-chilled. Don't store limes below 45°F.

If the limes seem to be drying up, check the humidity. They should be stored in a place with high humidity (85%-95%).

If they seem to be deteriorating rather rapidly, check to make sure you're not keeping them near apples, avocados, bananas, melons, peaches, pears, or tomatoes. All of those fruits are high producers of ethylene, which adversely affects limes.

TMI for ethylene: http://www.mindfully.org/Plastic/Ethylene-Gas.htm

Hope my 2˘ helps someone.


[ This Message was edited by: The Gnomon 2007-05-15 13:08 ]


 View Profile of The Gnomon Send a personal message to The Gnomon      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
GatorRob
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 20, 2004
Posts: 1770
From: 3 hrs 33 mins to paradise
Posted: 2007-05-16 10:02 am   Permalink

Wow, that was more than 2 cents worth! You definitely take your limes seriously. One thing though, regarding key limes, they turn from dark green to yellow when they are ripe and I believe it is those that you want. But I know you were referring to Persians.

 
View Profile of GatorRob Send a personal message to GatorRob      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
The Gnomon
Grand Member (7 years)  

Joined: May 01, 2007
Posts: 1290
From: MD-DC-VA
Posted: 2007-05-16 12:29 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2007-05-16 10:02, GatorRob wrote:
But I know you were referring to Persians.



Yep. The "green lemon" reference is regarding Persians. Key limes are pretty rare around here, so I'm not nearly as particular. Sometimes they come in a netted bag, and while I don't buy Persians in a bag unless I have no choice, around here if you see a key lime, you snatch it up.


 
View Profile of The Gnomon Send a personal message to The Gnomon      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Digitiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 22, 2004
Posts: 754
From: L.A. baby!
Posted: 2007-05-17 09:34 am   Permalink

OK so I'm by no means an expert on this, but....
I have found a pretty sure fire way to pick the juiciest limes (Persians). There is a Mexican market on the corner near me and they carry the larger Persians and little bity green limes...they actually look darker than Key limes, but they may be. Anyway, I have found that if you pick a lime that looks swollen they tend to be ripe and full of juice. Limes have, what look to me like pores. If a lime is very dark green and the pores are deep--it will be less juicy. A lime that is starting to turn yellow and the pores are shallow--the lime looks swollen, those tend to be quite juicy. I hope this makes sense.
_________________
____________________________

"You're not drunk if you can lie on the floor without holding on." -- Dean Martin


 
View Profile of Digitiki Send a personal message to Digitiki      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
The Gnomon
Grand Member (7 years)  

Joined: May 01, 2007
Posts: 1290
From: MD-DC-VA
Posted: 2007-05-17 12:46 pm   Permalink

Digi, in your case, I wouldn't be surprised if you had just run into Persian limes from two different farm sources, the smaller ones having experienced a bad growing season. They could also be Persians and another variety of lime that isn't Key lime (e.g., Kaffir limes—very bitter, bumpy-skinned, look like little spherical green brains: but their leaves are essential in Thai cooking).

I'm just guessing now, even though I should probably know (and most likely will find out soon), but I suspect that most of the limes we buy in the grocery stores are of a grade called "US Combination." The USDA grades for limes are: US No. 1, US Combination, and US No. 2. Because limes don't "have" to be graded, there is also the designation, "unclassified."

Since there always seems to be a mixture of lime qualities in each carton of limes that is received into the grocery stores, it's probably US Combination. I would think that US Combination would be cheaper for the stores to get than something requiring more labor to distinguish quality.

Here is the USDA specification for the grades of Persian (Tahiti) limes.

Plump, soft, heavy limes, regardless of other characteristics, are going to be juicy. The shiny, smooth-skinned ones taste the best. Bigger is not better. I'd rather have a smaller lime of excellent quality than a "green lemon" of twice its size.


 View Profile of The Gnomon Send a personal message to The Gnomon      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Goto page ( Previous Page 1 | 2 | 3 )
U-Moderate:
  
v1.5

[ About Tiki Central | Contact Tiki Central | Advertise on Tiki Central ]
(c) 2000-2014 Tikiroom.com (tm), Tiki Central (tm)

Credits & copyright infomation