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Tiki Central Forums » » Bilge » » Best Fake ID where ?
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Best Fake ID where ?
Matt Reese
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 09, 2005
Posts: 1155
From: San Diego
Posted: 2007-08-10 11:37 am   Permalink

Is it just me, or is this whole thread one big advice column on how to do something illegal? I'm no saint...but this just seems stupid.

 
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Kitty
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Sep 28, 2006
Posts: 64
From: an exclusive litter
Posted: 2007-08-10 12:27 pm   Permalink

Regardless of the state you are in, I think providing liquor to someone considered underage is called contributing to the deliquency of a minor. Additionally, bartenders can be held responsible for serving liquor to a minor, fake ID or no.

Unga Bunga is a god.

[ This Message was edited by: Kitty 2007-08-10 12:30 ]


 
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JenTiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 16, 2006
Posts: 1853
From: Wandering the eastern shores
Posted: 2007-08-10 12:30 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2007-08-10 11:37, Matt Reese wrote:
Is it just me, or is this whole thread one big advice column on how to do something illegal? I'm no saint...but this just seems stupid.


Actually, I believe if you read through the first couple pages, you'll see that most of the posts have advised against doing anything illegal. The advice has primarily been to find out what is legal and work within those laws. Yes, the original post was asking about how to do something illegal, but I think you'll find that no one has actually answered the original question.


 
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Haole'akamai
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 07, 2005
Posts: 2273
From: The Polynesian Port of NOLA
Posted: 2007-08-10 1:16 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2007-08-10 12:30, JenTiki wrote:
Quote:

On 2007-08-10 11:37, Matt Reese wrote:
Is it just me, or is this whole thread one big advice column on how to do something illegal? I'm no saint...but this just seems stupid.


Actually, I believe if you read through the first couple pages, you'll see that most of the posts have advised against doing anything illegal. The advice has primarily been to find out what is legal and work within those laws. Yes, the original post was asking about how to do something illegal, but I think you'll find that no one has actually answered the original question.



Yep, we're interested in finding out what Johnny Law enforces (and I specifically pointed out that fake IDs should not be a definite no-no). I'm not judging, just saying...
_________________
"If you can't be a good example -- then you'll just have to be a horrible warning."
-Catherine Aird


 
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sushiman
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 28, 2007
Posts: 313
From: Kumamoto , Japan
Posted: 2007-08-10 4:42 pm   Permalink

I guess I've been in Japan too long ( 22 years next month ) ...Over here , one can drink legally at the age of 20 . Before one reaches the age of 20 , one can drink in a restaurant or other public place when under a parent's or guardian's supervision ...In 21+ years in Japan I have never seen anyone get proofed ...Sure , some kids take advantage of this lack of enforcement , but honestly , we don't have a big problem with underage drinking in Japan . Beer and other liquors are still sold in street vending machines for chrissakes ! One of legal age can drink just about anywhere inc. public parks . One can actually walk down the streets of Tokyo drinking sake or beer ...

I now recall being back on Long Island a few years ago and walking from my parents front yard - which is 200 yards from the beach - down to the water for a swim carrying an open can of beer . A cop stopped and informed me that I could be arrested for walking the streets with an open can or bottle of an alcoholic beverage . I was ordered to return home and finish the beer . Oh , and I was perfectly sober at the time .

At age 40+ I have been proofed twice in the USA - once at an amusement park in Mass., and the other time at a restaurant at the Smithaven Mall on Long Island . Now , I do look young for my age , but this is ridiculous !

So , despite my aforementioned experiences , and being accustomed to the laws and their enforcement ( or lack thereof ) in Japan ( where I have spent the vast majority of my adult life ) , I must admit that when I started this thread I underestimated the seriousness of obtaining and using a fake ID in the Land Of The Free . After all , in a country where an adult can be arrested for standing on the side of the road in front of his or her house sipping on a beer ...

Geez , maybe the Hawaiian police are monitoring this thread , and my daughter and I will be under surveillance during our one week stay ?



[ This Message was edited by: sushiman 2007-08-10 16:45 ]


 
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Mai Tai
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 21, 2004
Posts: 1436
From: Exotic Isle of Alameda
Posted: 2007-08-10 5:22 pm   Permalink

Yeah, in the land of the free, people make a huge effort to save us from ourselves, 'cause lord knows, we just can't be trusted to control ourselves. And their efforts obviously work, becuase absolutely none of us on Tiki Central, or in the good ol' USA, have EVER tried alcohol before age 21, or whatever the legal limit was.

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"It's Mai Tai. It's out of this world." - Victor Jules Bergeron Jr.



[ This Message was edited by: Mai Tai 2007-08-10 19:15 ]


 
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Mr. NoNaMe
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 10, 2006
Posts: 1919
Posted: 2007-08-10 5:33 pm   Permalink

Also, the "minor" that is served alcohol can sue the establishment if said minor is involved in an accident due to intoxication.

The legal guardians of the minor can also sue.

At least I think so. Seems like one can sue for anything.

Ahhh, the American way!

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Signature? I ain't signin nothin!

[ This Message was edited by: Mr. NoNaMe 2007-08-10 17:34 ]


 
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ootwoods
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Jul 15, 2007
Posts: 48
Posted: 2007-08-10 5:33 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2007-08-10 17:33, Mr. NoNaMe wrote:
Also, the "minor" that is served alcohol can sue the establishment if said minor is involved in an accident due to intoxication.

The legal guardians of the minor can also sue.

Ahhh, the American way!




And we all believe that trying an "adult beverage" under the age of 21 is exactly the same as smoking an illegal prohibited drug.


 
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sushiman
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 28, 2007
Posts: 313
From: Kumamoto , Japan
Posted: 2007-08-10 6:52 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2007-08-10 17:22, Mai Tai wrote:
Yeah, in the land of the free, people make a huge effort to stop us before we hurt ourselves, 'cause lord knows, we just can't be trusted to control ourselves. And their efforts obviously work, becuase absolutely none of us on Tiki Central, or in the good ol' USA, have NEVER tried alcohol before age 21, or whatever the legal limit was.




Ambrose: America is turning into a nanny state
June 13, 2007

Jay Ambrose

It pretends to care for us, tucking us in at night, a smile on its lips, compassion in its eyes, but then, as our trust grows, it puts a pillow over our faces. Though we writhe and kick and try to shout, we find ourselves being smothered to death.

I speak of the nanny state, which also happens to be the title of a book by David Harsanyi, a Denver columnist I recently met, a pleasant fellow whose unpleasant message is that the country is jam-packed with people wanting to tell us how to live our lives even when our behavior affects no one but ourselves.

You don’t want to go along with them? Too bad, because time and again they are successful in getting the government to make you shape up at penalty if you don’t — for your own good, of course.

One much-discussed instance of coercion for the sake of rescuing us dummies from ourselves are the restrictions on smoking in bars and restaurants, even though most bars and restaurants are nonsmoking to begin with and no one is forced to spend time working or relaxing in one where tobacco fumes circulate.

People who read this also read:
Garcia: Board is wrong address for Ed Jew
Dickey: Barry Lite can't save the Giants
McCain urges free trade with Latin America, more pressure on Cuba
Stocks Plummet on Soaring Bond Yields
U.S. Nuclear Envoy Visits North Korea
The do-gooders want to go much further, of course — many would like nothing better than to have the government dictate what kinds of hamburgers you can consume. And wait — is that a coercive glimmer in their eyes when they snarl about all the sugar and calories packed into Girl Scout cookies?

In New York City, Harsanyi’s book informs us, you can get a court summons for having a bag next to you in a subway, feeding pigeons or sitting on a milk crate. I think you get the picture.

Let’s make a few observations, beginning with the obvious point that the premise of the nanny state contradicts the basic premise of our democratic republic — that we citizens are self-accountable, rational and perfectly capable not only of caring for ourselves but, through our election choices, of governing the nation in which we live.

The premise of the nanny state is that we lack the capacity to cross streets safely without some intellectually and morally superior government official holding our hand.

The objective of the nanny state is to force us to behave properly for our own sakes, which is impossible to do as a matter of law and regulation without abridging our freedoms to choose the way we will live as long as we don’t hurt others. It is, of course, true, as the old saying goes, that my freedom to swing my fist ends where your nose begins.

The nanny state crowd would have you believe that any harm to ourselves is a harm to society, the argument being that even some sort of amorphous, distant, possible social cost is sufficient reason for regulation.

Wiser heads point out this formula is often false (my early death would save the government Social Security expenditures), that regulations themselves can be deadly and that totalitarianism is excused by this way of thinking.

The nanny state is a kissing cousin of Big Brother, the kind of government that always keeps an eye on you, ready to fix you if you ignore it. And even before it goes that far, it is a diminution of our humanity; it robs us of our dignity as self-deciding moral agents, and in doing that, it strips away a fair portion of what lends life meaning. It puts a pillow over our faces.




 
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Turbogod
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 14, 2002
Posts: 1219
Posted: 2007-08-12 5:32 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2007-08-09 15:46, Haole Kat wrote:
Holy shit, talk about stupid.

BTW - anyone know where I can get some good weed?


Say it ain't so Josh! Say it ain't so! Wished you guys were at Hot Rod Hula Hop.


 
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The Gnomon
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 01, 2007
Posts: 1293
From: MD-DC-VA
Posted: 2007-08-21 10:39 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2007-08-10 17:22, Mai Tai wrote:
Yeah, in the land of the free, people make a huge effort to save us from ourselves, 'cause lord knows, we just can't be trusted to control ourselves. And their efforts obviously work, becuase absolutely none of us on Tiki Central, or in the good ol' USA, have EVER tried alcohol before age 21, or whatever the legal limit was.



I had my first Mai Tai at the Lahaina Inn in Maui when I was 14. It was actually Aunt Mary's Mai Tai. After a long lecture on the definition of a perfect Mai Tai (which the one she was holding was supposed to be), I talked her into letting me try hers (I laid a guilt trip on her for boasting about it and then not sharing—hee hee). I gulped it down and it was the best, in any language. She and Aunt Sheila freaked 'cause they thought I'd just take a sip. I did leave about a third in the glass. Back then they were serving them in tall glasses (15-16 oz?). Took the edge off my incredibly painful sunburn though. That was a fantastic day!

Anyway, I can sympathize with people who allow their kids to have a drink once in a while under their supervision. The gub'ment is always trying to "help" us to live "better" lives. There was a time when you could spank your kid to discipline them. When you did, they might not understand yet why (eventually they would), but they were careful not to walk down that path again without weighing the consequences. I bet just about all of the most respected members of society were spanked at some point as kids. Now if you spank a kid, thanks to the gub'ment, the kid ends up in foster care 'cause the parents get arrested for child abuse. Only in America (the United States thereof to be specific).

I had drinks from time to time as a kid and look at me. I turned out OK. Hold on. Gotta get the phone. I think it's my parole officer. Yep. Gotta go now. Catch you on the flipside.


 
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