FEATURES | MUSIC | BOOKS | DRINKS | FORUMS | GAMES | LINKS | ABOUT


advertise on Tiki Central

Celebrating classic and modern Polynesian Pop
  [Edit Profile]  [Edit Preferences]  [Search] [Sign Up]
[Personal Messages]  [Member List]  [Help/FAQ]  [Rules]  [Login]
Tiki Central Forums Tiki Drinks and Food What is cane sugar?
What is cane sugar?
Okolehao
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 03, 2006
Posts: 234
From: Monterey, CA
Posted: 2007-09-07 07:47 am   Permalink

Is it molasses, or turbinado sugar with the natural molasses remaining in the crystals, such as the brand Sugar In The Raw?
_________________

Classic Velvets
by Song Shen


 
View Profile of Okolehao Send a personal message to Okolehao  Goto the website of Okolehao     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Martiki-bird
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 23, 2007
Posts: 136
From: Blue Lory Lounge, NJ
Posted: 2007-09-07 08:11 am   Permalink

Cane sugar is a general term used to differentiate sugar (sucrose) derived from sugar cane versus beet sugar (sucrose derived from beets). The other common sweetener is fructose derived from fruits and achenes (the one we're most familiar with is the one derived from corn which is an achene.)

Brown sugar is partially refined cane sugar depending on manufacterer and contains about 3% molasses. Turbinado sugar is 'first pressing' cane sugarand has slightly more molasses and it is also partially refined (the name 'turbinado' refers to the spinning refining process.) Raw sugar is also partially refined (otherwise there would be fibers in the sugar)

White sugar is completely refined cane sugar (no molasses.) Which sugar you use depends on what you want as an end-product. Assuming you're not talking about baking, you can sub one for the other,so if you want a darker product with a brown sugar/molasses taste, use a raw or brown, otherwise use white.

Hope this helps!


 
View Profile of Martiki-bird Send a personal message to Martiki-bird  Email Martiki-bird Goto the website of Martiki-bird     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
DJ HawaiianShirt
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Feb 04, 2006
Posts: 148
From: NoVA, DC
Posted: 2007-09-07 08:13 am   Permalink

Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe the term "cane sugar" has a broader definition that you may be thinking.

I'm a big beverage enthusiast, and so my familiarity with cane sugar is defined in terms of what it is not. The way I understand it, cane sugar is simply any kind of sugar that is processed from sugarcane. Some sodas, for example, use cane sugar, however most use high fructose corn syrup for sweetener, a result of US tariff laws on Caribbean sugar and subsidies to US corn farmers. Some sodas are also sweetened with sucrose, which is basically refined sugar that can either be from sugarcane or sugar beets.

But yes, turbinado sugar is from sugarcane, and technically, I suppose any kind of molasses can also be considered as such.

So anyway, cane sugar is really just any sort of sugar(processed to any extent, whether it's molasses, turbinado, or pure sucrose) that is derived from sugarcane, as opposed to sugar beets, or any other fructose sugar from any other kind of plant.
_________________


Spirited Remix - cocktails and spirits blog
http://spiritedremix.blogspot.com


 
View Profile of DJ HawaiianShirt Send a personal message to DJ HawaiianShirt  Goto the website of DJ HawaiianShirt     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Scottes
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Feb 18, 2007
Posts: 490
From: A Little North Of Boston
Posted: 2007-09-07 08:35 am   Permalink

Technically, I think DJ is correct: "...cane sugar is simply any kind of sugar that is processed from sugarcane." But Martiki-bird is not incorrect: "Cane sugar is a **general** term...."


In my understanding "cane sugar" is, of course, specific to the sugar cane plant but I think it's often used to differentiate fully processed sugar from the sugar cane plant from the less-processed sugar from the sugar cane plant. That is, fully processed sugar will be marked "sugar" regardless of origin whereas "cane sugar" indicates that it's not only from sugar cane but also that it is less refined.

There is no law or rule to this, it just seems to be a common use from my research and visits to a small variety of those stores that tend towards natural and organic products.


Personally, I am used to fully processed sugar in my coffeee, from many years of bad habits. For my simple syrup I always use "cane sugar" (the partially processed stuff) and I'll sometimes make it from turbinado when I want an extra bit of complexity in a cocktail. Between the 3, I find the sweetness to be equal but the tastes to be much different. I really don't like turbinado in my coffee - the tastes don't match. Can sugar is OK - in a pinch - but I prefer processed. Now for an apple pie (or spice cake or oatmeal cookie) I would certainly give turbinado a try, since the tastes would be complementary IMHO. But not in a sugar cookie.

_________________
Scottes' Rum Pages - Rum Reviews & Info

[ This Message was edited by: Scottes 2007-09-07 08:42 ]


 View Profile of Scottes Send a personal message to Scottes  Goto the website of Scottes     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Martiki-bird
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 23, 2007
Posts: 136
From: Blue Lory Lounge, NJ
Posted: 2007-09-07 09:42 am   Permalink

Aha, DJ Hawaiian Shirt and I seemed to have replied at the same time...sorry about that.

It's probably also important to note that molasses is a byproduct of the sugar-refining process and it can't be substitited in a recipe calling for cane sugar. Sugar in the raw is turbinado sugar, and the larger crystals mean that when using heat to melt the sugar, the sugar must be stirred constantly otherwise you will caramelize it and therefore change the taste.

Yes Scottes, I think you're correct that many folks (especially in the health food industry) use "cane sugar" to refer to a less-refined product, but the industry-standard use of "cane sugar" only refers to it's origin (which is really, really important if you're purchasing sugar for baked goods or confections as beet sugar can perform very differently.)

The 'cane sugar' purchased in a health food store differs from 'white sugar' only in the amount of molasses and impurities. The name 'cane sugar' sells better because it sounds more natural. Organic refers to how the cane was grown (and there are very strict laws about this labeling), not how it was produced.

Both products have been through some sort of refining process (and there are many different techniques used), and they're both made up of sucrose. The white is 99% sucrose (1%impurities), the "health food cane sugar" has 95-97% (the rest of the percentage being molasses plus impurities.) Neither product is particularly good for you if you need to watch your sugar intake...

I personally use cane sugar (the health food organic variety) for some things where I do want that molasses taste (simple syrup=yum), but white (crystal white) for baking, jellies, pickles and candies unless the recipe calls for another sweetener (brown, light brown, raw or maple sugar) because the moisture content can change the end result.

Please note that I'm looking at this from a baker's perspective and that the rules are a bit different for beverages.

M-B
P.S. Scottes, when you are in the area (Rumfest, perhaps?) I'll be sure to send you home with some sugar cookies topped with demerara sugar. Heavenly!!!


 
View Profile of Martiki-bird Send a personal message to Martiki-bird  Email Martiki-bird Goto the website of Martiki-bird     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Scottes
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Feb 18, 2007
Posts: 490
From: A Little North Of Boston
Posted: 2007-09-07 10:20 am   Permalink

Quote:

P.S. Scottes, when you are in the area (Rumfest, perhaps?) I'll be sure to send you home with some sugar cookies topped with demerara sugar. Heavenly!!!


I didn't think about *topping* the sugar cookies with demerara sugar! YUM! I was just thinking about using such a heavy sugar as the "sugar ingredient" portion.

But yes, I'll be at RumFest on the 15th, staying overnight in the city and then driving back home sometime Tuesday. I'm beginning to look forward to this day more and more...
_________________


 View Profile of Scottes Send a personal message to Scottes  Goto the website of Scottes     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
The Gnomon
Grand Member (7 years)  

Joined: May 01, 2007
Posts: 1292
From: MD-DC-VA
Posted: 2007-09-07 10:43 am   Permalink

Brown Sugar is what I try to get from the hot babes I meet down in the Chocolate City.

Cane Sugar is what I try to give them


 
View Profile of The Gnomon Send a personal message to The Gnomon      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Okolehao
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 03, 2006
Posts: 234
From: Monterey, CA
Posted: 2007-09-07 11:05 am   Permalink

Thanks for all the information. The reason I asked was I, as my nom de plume suggests, have been working hard to gather all the ingrediants needed to make okolehao and one of the ingredients is simply 'cane sugar'. I'm guessing that turbinado is what my recipe is calling for since it would give the oke a more complicated rum like flavor. I also think since it was originally a back woods moonshine it probably was made with the cheaper and more easily obtained raw sugar, especially since it was probably made by sugar cane workers.

 
View Profile of Okolehao Send a personal message to Okolehao  Goto the website of Okolehao     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Scottes
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Feb 18, 2007
Posts: 490
From: A Little North Of Boston
Posted: 2007-09-07 11:15 am   Permalink

Well, I've seen 3 different colors of "cane sugar" - light tan "organic cane sugar" and turbinado and demerara. The taste grows stronger in that order - "cane" is the lightest, while demerara is the strongest. (And then there's brown sugar...)

You might want to try both "cane" and turbinado, though if you try only one then I would certainly do the turbinado.
_________________


 View Profile of Scottes Send a personal message to Scottes  Goto the website of Scottes     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
The Gnomon
Grand Member (7 years)  

Joined: May 01, 2007
Posts: 1292
From: MD-DC-VA
Posted: 2007-09-07 2:16 pm   Permalink

The best of the turbinado sugar I see on the shelves comes from Hawai'i. Inasmuch as your oke is a Hawai'ian recipe (right?), I don't think you'll go wrong going that route.

 
View Profile of The Gnomon Send a personal message to The Gnomon      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
U-Moderate:
  
v1.5

[ About Tiki Central | Contact Tiki Central | Advertise on Tiki Central ]
(c) 2000-2014 Tikiroom.com (tm), Tiki Central (tm)

Credits & copyright infomation