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Tiki Central Forums Tiki Music Earliest exposure to Exotica. That I can remember.
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Earliest exposure to Exotica. That I can remember.
Bora Boris
Mr. Unreasonable

Joined: Mar 25, 2005
Posts: 2535
From: Boogie Wonderland
Posted: 2007-12-26 6:02 pm   Permalink

Courtesy of the Wild World of Animals

Still sounds awesome.

What was yours?



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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11003
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2007-12-27 12:25 pm   Permalink

Good concept for a thread! My first "exposure" to Exotica was (appropriately) of purely visual nature. I moved to Berlin as a young lad of 17, partially to escape the German army's mandatory draft, because Berlin was still under allied forces supervision defense-wise back then (...that was in 1972).
A year later, I found a basement apartment in the suburb of Berlin Dahlem, where the American Forces were stationed nearby. Now, ever since I can remember I was what I would consider an "Americanophile", as opposed to other people, whose cultural inclinations would maybe make them Francophiles, or Anglophiles (people who would be into French culture, or Brtitish pop). Maybe it had to do with the fact that my parents lived in Chicago in the 1950s (before I was born), where my dad worked for my grandfather's Hamburg-Chicago shipping line.

So the US Armed Forces in Berlin had their own neighborhood with a Cinema, their own stores, even their own trash system. I was a frequent visitor to their thrift shop, where, as you can imagine in the 70s, lots of good stuff was to be had for cheap.

It was here that I first set eyes on Martin Denny's "Primitiva", and it was love at first sight! NOT the music, mind you, it was clearly the "exposure" of Sandy Warner's cleavage (and her eyes!) that shook my young man's world. I was blown away by the cover's sensuality and promise of "primitive" sexuality.
Funnily, in 1973, I was not "advanced" enough in Kitsch culture to make the leap to appreciate the MUSIC on the album, that came years later, when my friend Moritz R. had been introduced to Exotica through Boyd Rice's visit to Germany.

And I certainly had NO idea back in '73 that a whole 30 years later I would be in Hawaii one day and actually MEET the man who recorded "Primitiva", and hear him play (and that I eventually would have a reproduction of that enticing cover in TIKI MODERN).



It is pretty amazing how things can come full circle in ones life!



 
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Jeff Central
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 23, 2002
Posts: 1565
From: Columbus, Ohio
Posted: 2007-12-27 12:59 pm   Permalink

It is interesting to note that the early Industrial noise artists like Boyd Rice and Throbbing Gristle's Genesis P-Orridge were speading the Exotica grooves as far back as the late seventies. My first exposure came from listening to TG's "live" cassettes which frequently played Martin Denny's music after their performances. It appealed to me but I had no idea who it was at the time.

Then when TG's "Greatest Hits" album came out on Rough Trade Records the back was dedicated to Martin Denny. Finally, a name. From the mid-eighties on I actively searched for his records like a kid in a candy store. My first one was "Exotica." Upon listening to it I knew this was the music I was searching for. Upon closer inspection I noticed that half of the tracks were composed by Les Baxter. Another name!!

I cannot tell you how exciting it was to discover this music for the first time. It is beyond words.

And the rest is history............

Cheers and Mahalo,
Jeff


 
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tabuzak
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 07, 2005
Posts: 269
From: New York City
Posted: 2007-12-27 2:03 pm   Permalink


My grandfather was a hi-fi nut and he turned me on to Martin Denny, as well as Les Paul, Henry Mancini, Ferrante and Teicher's prepared pianos and the like, in the late 50s. Martin Denny's version of "Quiet Village" was my favorite. Even though I was about 5 years old, I liked the stuff so much that I asked for my own copies of the records for birthday and Christmas gifts. I just had a kid's record player, which my grandfather referred to as my "lo-fi," but it could play LPs. My parents threw tiki parties with tiki torches, exotica, and bowls of rum punch, so I have fond memories of that too. (I remember sneaking downstairs early in the morning after one of those parties and sampling the punch too!)

My grandfather died in 1966 and I inherited his record collection. At the time I was into the British mod scene and had put the exotica behind (but fortunately in a safe place). I pulled it out again in the 80s because it sounded better to me than the stuff that was coming out at the time. I've been a devotee ever since.

Jack


 
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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11003
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2007-12-27 2:11 pm   Permalink

Jeff, thank you for all your supportive posts, your vinyl archeology has enriched this forum immeasurably. I wonder how many T.C.ers trace their Exotica exposure back to Throbbing Gristle. I never understood why, when they loved Martin Denny so much, they never made any music as beautiful as his!
And I wonder how many members of the original Exotica Mailing List are here on TC now.

Wasn't there a thread here once on all the varieties of new interpretations of the original "Exotica" cover? How many are there? Here are two examples of how Sandy Warner's bewitching come hither look on "Primitiva" inspired some of today's artists:


Coop's illustration for the Book of Tiki


detail of wonderful painting I own by Miles Thompson

...but back to the main thrust of this thread, the first MUSICAL exposure to Exotica!



[ This Message was edited by: bigbrotiki 2007-12-27 14:14 ]


 
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bb moondog
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 18, 2006
Posts: 491
From: Gilbert AZ
Posted: 2007-12-27 2:15 pm   Permalink

http://members.cox.net/landbreade

all will be revealed @ page 2


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tabuzak
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 07, 2005
Posts: 269
From: New York City
Posted: 2007-12-27 2:28 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2007-12-27 14:11, bigbrotiki wrote:
Jeff, thank you for all your supportive posts, your vinyl archeology has enriched this forum immeasurably. I wonder how many T.C.ers trace their Exotica exposure back to Throbbing Gristle. I never understood why, when they loved Martin Denny so much, they never made any music as beautiful as his!
And I wonder how many members of the original Exotica Mailing List are here on TC now.

[ This Message was edited by: bigbrotiki 2007-12-27 14:14 ]



I was on the Exotica Mailing list (and still am) from pretty far back. As far as TG making music inspired by Martin Denny, have you heard Chris and Cosey's (of TG) "Exotika?" The title track is a great "contemporary" (it was the 80s I believe) version of...well...Exotika. Their "Musik Fantastique" was somehwt along the same lines.

Jack


 
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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11003
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2007-12-27 2:30 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2007-12-27 14:15, bb moondog wrote:
http://members.cox.net/landbreade

all will be revealed @ page 2



Wow, your King Quong story sounds like a dream come true. That's what I call being at the right place at the right time! And your use of the records at work reminds me of KBZet's concept of "irritainment". Like Tiki culture, for some of us Exotica had to go thru an evolution from being plain uncool to being SO uncool that they became cool.

[ This Message was edited by: bigbrotiki 2007-12-27 14:32 ]


 
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bb moondog
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 18, 2006
Posts: 491
From: Gilbert AZ
Posted: 2007-12-27 2:34 pm   Permalink

I have NEVER since those days worked at a place so RIPE as that little crapbox of an office with so much MIND TWEAKING...and the ones that stuck were exotica... which i still own
_________________
ahuka a'la a'la palu

BB MoondoggyO
sweatin' to Quiet Village in AZ


 
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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11003
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2007-12-28 08:16 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2007-12-27 14:28, tabuzak wrote:
....As far as TG making music inspired by Martin Denny, have you heard Chris and Cosey's (of TG) "Exotika?" The title track is a great "contemporary" (it was the 80s I believe) version of...well...Exotika.



Jack, check out what I dug up! My MUSICASSETTE version of the above album:



I guess I should give it another listen...



Problem is, I can only do that in my car nowadays.



Maybe that is the whole problem, that I never listened to this on a real record.


 
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tabuzak
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 07, 2005
Posts: 269
From: New York City
Posted: 2007-12-28 08:34 am   Permalink


Jack, check out what I dug up! My MUSICASSETTE version of the above album:

I guess I should give it another listen...


Hey,

Looks like there are four versions of "Exotica" (the track) you can download from Amazon.com for $.99 each.

http://www.amazon.com/Chris-Cosey/dp/B000QK52OI/ref=dm_ap_paging?ie=UTF8&%2AVersion%2A=1&page=2&%2Aentries%2A=0

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Jeff Central
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 23, 2002
Posts: 1565
From: Columbus, Ohio
Posted: 2007-12-28 09:57 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2007-12-28 08:34, tabuzak wrote:

Jack, check out what I dug up! My MUSICASSETTE version of the above album:

I guess I should give it another listen...


Hey,

Looks like there are four versions of "Exotica" (the track) you can download from Amazon.com for $.99 each.

http://www.amazon.com/Chris-Cosey/dp/B000QK52OI/ref=dm_ap_paging?ie=UTF8&%2AVersion%2A=1&page=2&%2Aentries%2A=0



Track #62 is the best version. I really like the way this starts out but then it gets pretty dance oriented. Still a good listen. Chris and Cosey are both fans of Exotica music.

It's funny because I played this track during my DJ set at Exotica 2005 (I think), and I distintcly remember King Kukulele coming up to me and saying "Jeff, what are you doing?" I laughed and said "What! they're saying E-X-O-T-I-C-A". He said "riiight".

TG had a track called "Exotica" on their 1979 album "20 Jazz Funk Greats." Also, the closest TG ever came to a real Exotica track was on the album "Journey Through a Body." That particular track was called "Exotic Functions." Plus, who could forget the Sandy Warner type cover on their "Greatest Hits" LP. The back cover even shows all the band members in Polynesian garb surrounded by Hawaiian kitsch. Keep in mind this was 1981 when it was released here in the U.S., 15 years before the Lounge craze!!!


There are all kinds of bands that did Exotica sounding songs. Check out "Homer Hossa" by Yello, or better yet try "Pineapple Symphony" by the German band Kraftwerk.

Electronic Exotica has always appealed to me and there is a LOT out there for the curiously inclined.

Cheers and Mahalo,
Jeff


 
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tabuzak
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 07, 2005
Posts: 269
From: New York City
Posted: 2007-12-28 10:08 am   Permalink


Another "rock" manifestation of Exotica was the B-52s track, "Mesopotamia," from the LP of the same name. The song is based on the Quiet Village bass line.

Jack


 
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lucas vigor
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 12, 2004
Posts: 3985
From: SOCAL
Posted: 2007-12-29 08:40 am   Permalink

1970. I am 5 years old and sitting on the floor of our living room listening to my mom's Arthur Lyman records. I have loved exotica ever since.

 
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tikiyaki
Grand Member (7 years)  

Joined: May 18, 2004
Posts: 2696
From: The Exotic Port of REDONDO BEACH, CA
Posted: 2007-12-29 09:29 am   Permalink

Hmmm....I really need to clear the cobwebs on this....but here goes.

I was born in 63' - TIKI was in full swing, but I was obviously not in any state to comprehend it yet.

I have a sister nine years older than me and I used to listen to her 45's...one of which was "wipe out". This is in, like 1967/68 . I've said in here before that Surf is really just the punk rock version of Exotica (in my opinion anyway) . Also, My mom, like everyone else in the 60's had "Herb Alpert's "Whipped Cream and other delights", and, naturally, I had a experience similar to Sven's with "Primitiva", only I was too young to know what it really was...I still consider the girl on that cover to be my first childhood crush Oh, I LOVED the music too.

Fast forward to the mid 90's. I'm starting to revisit surf rock, and all things great from the 60's. . I'm in a record store in Long Island. I hear a really amazing, slow, ethereal version of the theme from "Hawaii-Five 0" playing. I ask the clerk who it is (he's wearing a Hawaiian shirt by the way - yea - surf rock geek) and he says "The Blue Hawaiians", a band I'd heard about many times, having been living in LA for the past 2 years. I always meant to see them, but hadn't yet.

I don't know if I bought the CD that day of not, but once I did own it, I listened to it everyday for, I don't know....5 years ? (I still listen to it about once a week) The song "Last days of Summer" hit me the most, and probably what led me to "exotica", but also, some people I knew from the powerpop scene in LA in the mid-90's (remember that?) told me about Esquivel, and I got some of that as well. It was those two musical entities that influenced my earliest exotica recordings "Mai Tais on the Moon" and "Exotique", both on the "StereoExotique" CD.

After being a devout TIKI NEWS reader since about 96' , and then a TIKI Centralite later, I started discovering Lyman,Denny, and now a host of other obscure Exotica.

Now, there's no turning back.



[ This Message was edited by: tikiyaki 2007-12-29 09:30 ]


 
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