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Tiki Central Forums » » Locating Tiki » » De Young Museum, San Francisco, CA (other) *Lots of Thumbnail Images!*
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De Young Museum, San Francisco, CA (other) *Lots of Thumbnail Images!*
TikiGardener
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Joined: Mar 24, 2002
Posts: 1365
From: 1st website dedicated to Tiki Gardens
Posted: 2008-08-06 12:03 pm   Permalink

One Last shot... I've been playing around with medium format film cameras now for a few months. So I turned my attention to that feathered skull. Given that its low light, its a time exposure, but I like the otherworldly quality to it.

More for feel than detail.



[ This Message was edited by: TikiGardener 2008-08-06 12:04 ]

[ This Message was edited by: tikigardener 2008-08-06 13:38 ]


 
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christiki295
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Joined: Apr 09, 2003
Posts: 3818
From: LA-2547 mls east Hawaii &5500 Easter Is
Posted: 2008-08-24 2:29 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2008-07-30 13:29, bigbrotiki wrote:

It is amazing that they have so many cool pieces, I never see the DeYoung mentioned anywhere. If the new LACMA acquisition was 5 Million bucks worth, this collection must be worth many times more. You have a treasure there, San Franciscans.



I love that fact that two premier institutions like LACMA and the DeYoung have Oceanic Art collections.


 
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dogbytes
  

Joined: Mar 24, 2002
Posts: 2242
From: seattle, wa
Posted: 2008-09-19 10:39 pm   Permalink

Museum collection threatened by family feud
John Coté, Chronicle Staff Writer

Friday, September 19, 2008


(09-19) 20:45 PDT -- An entire wing of the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum that was built to hold a peerless collection of art from Papua New Guinea could be emptied by an inheritance battle between heirs of the Annenberg publishing fortune.

That threat in the coast-to-coast dispute prompted San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera to obtain an emergency court order today to prevent the art from being seized and sold.

"We're going to do everything possible to make sure the collection is available to the city for the benefit of the public," Herrera said.

At the heart of the dispute is de Young Trustee John Friede, who appears to have promised his prized collection to the museum but also put it up as collateral in a legal dispute with his brothers in Florida.

The 400 works at the museum are part of the 4,000-piece Jolika Collection compiled by Friede and his wife, Marcia. The array, which includes masks and ritual headdresses, is considered the world's most important private collection of objects from Papua New Guinea.

Estimates of the value vary, but the 400 items at the de Young are insured for more than $90 million, a city official said. They take up more than a quarter of the museum's permanent exhibit space, and their inclusion at the de Young's Golden Gate Park building that opened in 2005 was hailed beyond the Bay Area in art trade publications and the New York Times.

"It's truly one of the most unique collections of its kind anywhere in the world," said John Buchanan, director of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, which includes the de Young. "They have made the de Young really one of the great centers for the study and appreciation of Papua New Guinea art. It's a tremendous jewel in the crown of the city's museums."

That status is threatened by a heated inheritance dispute playing out in a courthouse in Florida's Palm Beach County that spilled over this week into San Francisco Superior Court.

Family feud
Three brothers - John Friede, Robert Friede and Thomas Jaffe - have been feuding since 2005 over the estate of their mother, Evelyn A.J. Hall, a sister of the late publishing tycoon Walter Annenberg. Under a settlement reached on Oct. 18, 2007, John and Marcia Friede agreed to pay his brothers $30 million - $20 million of which was secured by the couple's art collection, according to figures in the case.

The problem was that a week earlier, John Friede had finalized paperwork donating the entire 4,000 piece collection to the city-owned de Young, according to documents from the city attorney.

Last week, a probate judge in Florida ruled that John and Marcia Friede had breached the settlement agreement by its deal with the de Young and by granting a lien on the art in exchange for a $670,000 advance, court documents show.

Judge John Phillips ordered the couple to turn over "all collateral described in the security agreement, which is in their care, custody or control" to the two other brothers. The balance of the Jolika Collection is at the couple's home outside New York City, according to court filings. Those pieces had been donated to the museum even if they had not been moved, according to the city.

Herrera's office tried to intervene in the Florida case this week, but Phillips would not allow it, prompting Herrera to file a case in San Francisco Superior Court. There, Judge Peter Busch issued a temporary restraining order prohibiting the artwork from being removed from the museum or the house. A hearing on the issue is scheduled for Oct. 6.

The main question is: Who really owns the artwork?

"That's a murky area," Deputy City Attorney Donald Margolis said. "We're taking the position that entirety of the Jolika Collection has been transferred to the museum."

History of giving
Buchanan, the museum director, said he did not feel misled that John Friede apparently entered into a deal with his brothers involving the artwork as collateral after signing it over to the de Young.

"I don't feel misled at all. What we're trying to do is support his ongoing charitable intentions," Buchanan said. "I'm not involved in his own personal situation with his family."

An attorney for John Friede could not be reached for comment.

John and Marcia Friede had been donating parts of the Jolika Collection, named from the first two letters of the names of their adult children, John, Lisa and Karen, to the museum since 2003, according to court records. De Young officials designed and built a major gallery specifically to house the collection and named it in honor of the couple.

The city attorney's court filings state that the other brothers intend to immediately seize the art, dismantle the collection and sell off the pieces.

A Florida attorney for Jaffe, one of the brothers, disputed that.

"Tom Jaffe does not intend to immediately sell or dismantle the tribal art collection," said attorney James Pressly Jr., who declined to comment further on his client's intentions.

Robert Friede's attorney could not be reached.

Adine Varah, a deputy city attorney, said the potential loss of the rare collection couldn't be measured.

"The value beyond monetary value is enormous," Varah said. "It spans centuries and regions. There is value that is far beyond any number that can be ascribed to it."


 
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bigbrotiki
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Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11270
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2008-09-20 03:27 am   Permalink

Thanks for that article, Elicia, that is alarming! I was just reading an article about John Friede donating his collection, in the Summer 2004 issue of "Art Tribal". Check out these pics from his home:







No wonder the wealth of Oceanic art at the De Young came as such a surprise to all of us: It was placed there so recently! It would be a bummer if it would not last there...

On a related issue, the same issue of "Tribal Art" had this great PNG "Phantom" shield in it:



whose story I always loved, and so I found other examples here:
http://www.artnet.com/magazineus/reviews/karlins/karlins6-28-07.asp

...and which led me to a very interesting sounding book and DVD:

http://www.ru.nl/cps/30/nb30e.html

"In this documentary, the famously-elusive scholar comments on his wide-ranging fieldwork in the Canadian Arctic and Papua New Guinea, concepts of authenticity and truth in media and art, the relationship between anthropology and surrealism, and the impossibility of preserving culture."

"...the impossibility of preserving culture"! Yeah...


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dogbytes
  

Joined: Mar 24, 2002
Posts: 2242
From: seattle, wa
Posted: 2008-09-22 9:12 pm   Permalink

safe for now!!

(09-22) 18:46 PDT -- The M.H. de Young Memorial Museum's matchless collection of art from Papua New Guinea appears to be safe from the auction block for at least three months, regardless of a family's inheritance fight that threatens to have artwork seized and sold.

John Friede, the de Young Museum trustee who pledged his 4,000-piece collection to the museum in a series of deals from 2003 to 2007, said today that he has no intention of turning the artwork over to his brothers, despite a Florida probate court's order to do so.

A San Francisco judge, at the request of City Attorney Dennis Herrera, issued a contradicting order on Friday, directing the artwork to remain where it is.

"Right now, the two courts offset each other, so I don't have to do anything. I'm frozen," Friede said from his home outside New York City. "These are ugly matters and I certainly hope that they resolve in a way that everyone in the family can be happy together."

The Florida ruling that was made public Monday forbids Friede's brothers from selling any of the art pieces before Dec. 20 so that ownership claims can be sorted out. A hearing in the San Francisco case is scheduled for Oct. 6.

The Jolika Collection, which Friede and his wife named after the first letters in the names of their three children, is considered the world's most important private collection of objects from Papua New Guinea.

It became a part of the inheritance battle because Friede promised the entire array to the de Young but then, in a deal dated a week later, put up the collection as collateral in a dispute with his two younger brothers. That inheritance fight started after the death of their mother, Evelyn A.J. Hall, a sister of the late publishing tycoon Walter Annenberg.

Friede agreed to pay a combined $30 million to his brothers, Robert Friede and Thomas Jaffe, to settle the dispute, and the brothers demanded collateral. John Friede maintains the promise of the art as collateral was a temporary measure never designed to involve the sale or transfer of the artwork, which include masks, various figures and dance ornaments.

So far the de Young is in possession of about 400 items in the collection and has them insured for $90 million. The new de Young museum, which opened in Golden Gate Park in 2005, was built with a wing designed especially to hold the collection.

The Florida judge said the brothers could sell up to $20 million worth of the tribal artwork as part of the settlement, but San Francisco officials maintain that the two brothers are not entitled to any part of the collection that John and Marcia Friede compiled over 40 years.

"The entirety of the collection, none of it is owned by John Friede and Marcia Friede. It's owned by the museum," said San Francisco Deputy City Attorney Donald Margolis.

John Friede said most, if not all, of the $30 million he owes his brothers will come from his share of their mother's estate, which includes valuable paintings by Pablo Picasso and Paul Gauguin. That money is not accessible until the Internal Revenue Service makes a determination on the inheritance tax and that amount is paid, John Friede said.

"The liens to the brothers are simply a guarantee that they will get this money, which I have every intention to pay," John Friede said. "I just don't have access to it until I get this IRS settlement."

An attorney for Jaffe declined to comment on that assessment, and an attorney for Robert Friede did not return calls seeking comment.

If John Friede can come up with $30 million settlement payment, the sale threat to the Jolika Collection disappears and the items will stay with the de Young.

John Friede said that could come in weeks, and by his May birthday at the latest.

"I'm 70. By the time I'm 71 ... I want this to be over with," he said. "They would get their money, and I'll get, whatever you want to call it - relief from legal bondage - and I can go on with my life."

John and Marcia Friede, starting in 2003, promised to provide rotating selections from their collection to the de Young. They later increased the amounts on loan to about 400 pieces, transferred ownership of at least 142 of those to the museum. In October 2007 they gifted the balance of the collection to the de Young, with the pieces to be handed over during the course of several years, documents show."My point is I love this stuff," John Friede said. "In an awful way now, of course, the public will be more interested in looking at it. Now it's not just art, it's a scandal."



 
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bigbrotiki
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Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11270
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2008-09-23 10:17 pm   Permalink

Good news. I never knew that:
"The new de Young museum, which opened in Golden Gate Park in 2005, was built with a wing designed especially to hold the collection. "

Wouldn't mind an inheritance such as this:
"John Friede said most, if not all, of the $30 million he owes his brothers will come from his share of their mother's estate, which includes valuable paintings by Pablo Picasso and Paul Gauguin."

I'd hate to have to sell my Gauguin, though!


 
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Cammo
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Joined: May 18, 2006
Posts: 1952
From: San Diego
Posted: 2008-09-24 03:56 am   Permalink

The Annenbergs are an interesting family - patriarch Moe Annenberg was a legbreaker for Hearst newpapers, who threw his money into a racing form and local publications that turned into the Philedelphia Inquirer. His son walter took that money and started TV Guide & Seventeen Magazine, which made him billions and earned him a political appointment to the Court of St. James. His son Roger committed suicide.

The Annenberg Foundation is maybe the biggest donator to the arts and education in the US, but it was probably started to assauge guit that Annenberg Jr. felt from starting the entire fortune with money derived from beating the crap out of people. Murder was never tied to Moe, but he spent three years in the pen for tax evasion. Later, the big money was made from telling people what was on TV each night.

Check out the amazing "Men of Tomorrow: Geeks, Gangsters, and the Birth of the Comic Book" by Gerard Jones for all the gory details.


 
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Unga Bunga
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Joined: Jun 06, 2003
Posts: 5824
From: CaliTikifornia
Posted: 2008-09-24 08:07 am   Permalink

Thanks for the pics.
This reminds me of some vintage mug. (peanut maybe?)



 
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Unga Bunga
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Joined: Jun 06, 2003
Posts: 5824
From: CaliTikifornia
Posted: 2008-09-24 08:10 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2008-08-06 12:03, TikiGardener wrote:
One Last shot... I've been playing around with medium format film cameras now for a few months. So I turned my attention to that feathered skull. Given that its low light, its a time exposure, but I like the otherworldly quality to it.
More for feel than detail.





He looks like he's either flippin us off, or picking his nose.
(could both be done at the same time?)


 
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tikibars
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Joined: Apr 11, 2002
Posts: 2024
From: Aku Hall, Chicago
Posted: 2008-11-04 10:56 am   Permalink

I visited the De Young last month when I was in the Bay Area for the Tiki crawl.

This is truly one of the finest collections of PNG art that I have seen.

There are a small handful of Maori and Rapa Nui artifacts, but the PNG collection is massive.

The Covarrubias mural is impressive as well.

Most of my pics are redundant to what has been posted above, but here are a few anyway -


















They also have these two large-format prints, which are from the same series that produced a set that hangs in the Bishop Museum in Honolulu:








They were produced in tall vertical strips, and meant to be assembled as a large interior mural. Not many complete sets survive; the set in the De Young is in better shape than the Bishop's set.



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[ This Message was edited by: tikibars 2008-11-04 13:32 ]


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bigbrotiki
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Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11270
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2008-11-04 5:11 pm   Permalink

Thanks for that crisp close up of the highly influential and often copied Trader Vic Tiki, James. And that Covarrubias Flora and Fauna mural, gorgeous. Did you ask them where the others are?

 
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little lost tiki
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Joined: Jun 12, 2006
Posts: 7595
From: Orange,CA-right near the Circle!
Posted: 2008-11-04 6:11 pm   Permalink

great pics!
i smell a ROADTRIP!


 
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Paipo
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Joined: Jun 22, 2006
Posts: 1886
From: Aotearoa / NZ
Posted: 2008-11-04 9:41 pm   Permalink

I can never get enough of these - thanks to all the contributors to this thread!
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Tiki Kaimuki
Grand Member (4 years)  

Joined: Sep 25, 2006
Posts: 823
From: OAKLAND, baby
Posted: 2008-11-14 10:40 am   Permalink

I went to see the collection a couple of weeks ago and was just in awe. Spent about an hour just studying all of the pieces- homework.
I recommend getting there right when they open. Not only will you most likely have a peaceful time looking at the pieces, but you will also avoid the throngs of people who are flocking to the area to go the the Hall of Science across the street. Golden Gate Park is a nightmare to try to drive around on the weekend.
SO worth the trip!
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Benzart
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Joined: Jan 09, 2004
Posts: 10365
From: Port Saint Lucie, Florida
Posted: 2009-09-22 05:49 am   Permalink

Bump this up for all to see

 
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