FEATURES | MUSIC | BOOKS | DRINKS | FORUMS | GAMES | LINKS | ABOUT


advertise on Tiki Central

Celebrating classic and modern Polynesian Pop
  [Edit Profile]  [Edit Preferences]  [Search] [Sign Up]
[Personal Messages]  [Member List]  [Help/FAQ]  [Rules]  [Login]
Tiki Central Forums Tiki Marketplace Hawaiian Eye Tiki Netsuke anyone ?
Goto page ( 1 | 2 Next Page )
Hawaiian Eye Tiki Netsuke anyone ?
sushiman
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 28, 2007
Posts: 313
From: Kumamoto , Japan
Posted: 2008-09-20 7:57 pm   Permalink

I have a contact in China who manufactures " netsuke " , which are small ornaments carved out of wood ( see pic ) . I was wondering if there would be any interest from members here for an Hawaiian Eye tiki replica netsuke . I'd have to order 50 to get the wholesale price which would be around $ 10 each . What do you all think ?

The netsuke I have ordered so far are about 6cm in height .








 
View Profile of sushiman Send a personal message to sushiman      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Mr. NoNaMe
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 10, 2006
Posts: 1919
Posted: 2008-09-20 9:27 pm   Permalink

First, I am 99% certain someone is already selling Hawaiian Eye pendants in the states. Not sure if they are made in China or Bali/Indonesia. They are about 3 inches/7.5-ish cm tall and made of wood. If your cost is gonna be $10 then it is NOT gonna be worth it if the seller in the states is already getting $10.

Secondly, I am down for more locally made stuff(USA). Less Chinese. I do not want to start chewing on a pendant and then have to think about getting melamine/mau mau poisening. Or pay some 80 year old to keep her thumbs out of the way of the blade/grinder. I have enough problems keeping my own thumbs out of the way of the blade. Lead is OK cuz I licked the hell out of that 35 years ago and I amnh juseudj5roewt fien!@1211.........WHOOoahhh, sorry!

If you(anyone) are in Japan, buy Japanese. If you are in China buy Chinese. If you are in East Chapeepee, buy East Chapeepee or if yer in ...Blah, blah, blah, blah...... and so on. Unless it is a real Shag or Doug Horne or Clysedale. Or Kinny, Paipo, Benz, HodadHank....ahhh man, there are just too many real artists to buy from.......I have a PDrake!!


EDIT: I fixed the part where I did not mention "slave labor".
EDIT #2: DOHHH!!


_________________
http://www.greyhoundog.org
__________________________

[ This Message was edited by: Mr. NoNaMe 2008-09-20 21:50 ]

[ This Message was edited by: Mr. NoNaMe 2008-09-20 21:52 ]


 View Profile of Mr. NoNaMe Send a personal message to Mr. NoNaMe      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
sushiman
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 28, 2007
Posts: 313
From: Kumamoto , Japan
Posted: 2008-09-20 9:35 pm   Permalink

These netsuke are " hand-made " , and of very nice quality . I have several in my home . Not slave labor .



 
View Profile of sushiman Send a personal message to sushiman      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
pdrake
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 13, 2006
Posts: 1769
From: las vegas
Posted: 2008-09-20 9:39 pm   Permalink

i've studied netsuke and erased all i had to say, which wasn't kind. i left one thing . . .

why would one buy a traditional japanese item from china?
_________________
give of yourself. it's the most precious of all gifts.


 
View Profile of pdrake Send a personal message to pdrake  Email pdrake     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Mr. NoNaMe
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 10, 2006
Posts: 1919
Posted: 2008-09-20 9:44 pm   Permalink

Quote:



why would one buy a traditional japanese item from china?




Hmm?
_________________


 
View Profile of Mr. NoNaMe Send a personal message to Mr. NoNaMe      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
pdrake
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 13, 2006
Posts: 1769
From: las vegas
Posted: 2008-09-20 9:49 pm   Permalink


_________________
give of yourself. it's the most precious of all gifts.


 
View Profile of pdrake Send a personal message to pdrake  Email pdrake     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Paipo
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 22, 2006
Posts: 1886
From: Aotearoa / NZ
Posted: 2008-09-20 10:39 pm   Permalink

Chinese netsuke are about as authentic as Indonesian tikis. Best not to give these guys any more ideas on designs to rip off than what they already have!
_________________


 View Profile of Paipo Send a personal message to Paipo  Goto the website of Paipo     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
sushiman
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 28, 2007
Posts: 313
From: Kumamoto , Japan
Posted: 2008-09-20 11:37 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2008-09-20 21:39, pdrake wrote:

why would one buy a traditional japanese item from china?




" Why would the president of the United States fly halfway around the world to watch four days of sports at the Beijing Olympics? George W. Bush is the first sitting American president to attend the Olympic Games on foreign soil. This, despite the fact that China has been recognized by the U.S. State Department as an authoritarian regime with a dismal human rights record. But Bush is savvy enough to understand America's economic dependence on China.

Virtually everything in America is now imported from China. This includes crucifixes and talking Jesus dolls. American Girl dolls, all the rage among the younger set, are made in China. The plastic for American Express cards is reportedly made in China. From toothpaste to computer accessories to food and vitamins, there is little that is not made in China. Even our Old Glory-brand American flags are manufactured in China. Indeed, it's almost impossible to avoid buying Chinese-made products.

One Louisiana family learned this the hard way when they attempted to live without products made in China for an entire year. They ended up buying expensive sneakers from Italy, forgoing candles on birthday cakes, living without a blender when theirs broke, nursing their television back to health when it crashed, killing mice the "old-fashioned way" and giving up holiday decorations.

Another family in South Dakota tried a similar experiment, but only for a week. They found that they were unable to purchase their usual Adidas, Nike or Sketchers sneakers and instead had to opt for American-made New Balance. Food was difficult since China produces 80% of the world's wheat gluten, found in most breads, and 80% of ascorbic acid (Vitamin C), a nutritional supplement and preservative used in almost everything. When the family tried to purchase entertainment, they found even the classic American board game Monopoly contained dice made in China.

Who's to blame for this "made in China" stranglehold in our marketplace? Much of it can be attributed to American corporations that buy from China and outsource their jobs to the emerging economic giant.

China has become the number one exporter of goods to the U.S., with its food exports to the U.S. increasing from $45 billion in 2003 to $64 billion in 2006. But food is not one of China's leading exports -- computers, household goods, toys, clothes, video equipment and footwear rank above it, all of which can be found at your local Wal-Mart. If Wal-Mart, one of America's largest retailers, were an individual state, it would be China's eighth largest trading partner.

Sam Walton founded Wal-Mart with the intention of creating a company known for quality products sold at discount prices. In 1985, as trade deficits grew and Americans feared their manufacturing jobs would move overseas, Walton created a "Buy American" campaign that promised he would buy nationally made products, as long as they were sold within 5% of the foreign competitors' prices.

However, as competition grew among Kmart, Target, Sears and other discount stores, Wal-Mart began increasing trade with foreign nations, while still promoting "Buy American." After his death in 1992, Dateline NBC researched Wal-Mart's success and discovered that Walton actually imported from China quite frequently, exposing the "Buy American" campaign as a facade. Following the Dateline report, Wal-Mart no longer tried to keep its relationship with China secret. Wal-Mart is now responsible for $27 billion, or 9%, of total United States imports from China.

Thus, if China has anyone to thank for its economic ascendancy, it's American corporations like Wal-Mart and American consumers like you and me.

China is emerging as the world's preeminent economy, developing military weapons that threaten the U.S., rising as a prime trading partner with U.S. allies, rivaling U.S. technological inventions and generally growing in size and influence. Incredibly, after three decades of averaging a 10% yearly growth rate, China will likely surpass Germany and even Japan to become the second largest economy in the world. China has already exceeded Japan as the second leading consumer of petroleum and the second largest producer of automobiles.

By keeping its currency undervalued, China decreases the price of exports to the U.S. At the same time, China has increased the price of imports, creating a large trade deficit and thus undermining the American economy. The U.S. currently has a $235 billion trade deficit to China -- a trade deficit, according to the Economic Policy Institute, that cost 2.3 million American jobs between 2001 and 2007.

Can anything be done?

Some lobbyists and special interest groups are advocating legislation to stop unfair trade practices with China. In turn, some in Congress have proposed legislation to curb China's growing trade imbalance and speed up currency reforms. But don't expect much from an inept, bungling Congress.

However, the ramifications of doing business with China go beyond mere economic considerations. There is a moral dimension, as well. The reality is that you're not going to be able to get around buying things that are made in China. However, that doesn't mean that we should give up and turn a blind eye to its abuses. China remains one of the most notorious rights-abusing regimes in the world.

The Constitution opens with those three beautiful words, "we the people." Unfortunately, we the people have lost control of our government, which has become little more than a tool for big business interests. We have allowed greed and the profit motive of mega-corporations to dictate government policies. Unless we drastically curtail such practices and take back the controls at all levels of our government -- city councils, state legislatures, Congress -- the Chinese trap will be the least of our worries. "




 
View Profile of sushiman Send a personal message to sushiman      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
sushiman
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 28, 2007
Posts: 313
From: Kumamoto , Japan
Posted: 2008-09-20 11:48 pm   Permalink

Made in Japan netsuke ( and believe me there are not many people making netsuke any longer in Japan ) :

$ 250





 
View Profile of sushiman Send a personal message to sushiman      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11594
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2008-09-21 12:09 am   Permalink

Very nice article, sushiman, thank you.

 
View Profile of bigbrotiki Send a personal message to bigbrotiki  Goto the website of bigbrotiki     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Hakalugi
Site Administrator

Joined: Aug 10, 2004
Posts: 3437
From: Redondo Beach, CA
Posted: 2008-09-21 12:27 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2008-09-20 21:39, pdrake wrote:
i've studied netsuke and erased all i had to say, which wasn't kind. i left one thing . . .

why would one buy a traditional japanese item from china?




According to the peeps at
Netsuke Central, the origin of contemporary Netsuke is usually of little concern. A long as nobody is trying to pass off the Chinese stuff as vintage Japanese, everyone is happy.

 View Profile of Hakalugi Send a personal message to Hakalugi      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Paipo
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 22, 2006
Posts: 1886
From: Aotearoa / NZ
Posted: 2008-09-21 04:54 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2008-09-21 00:27, Hakalugi wrote:


According to the peeps at Netsuke Central, the origin of contemporary Netsuke is usually of little concern. A long as nobody is trying to pass off the Chinese stuff as vintage Japanese, everyone is happy.



Check out the topmost thread on that forum (under Contemporary Netsuke) - "Broken Author Right". It's been posted on a couple of other carving forums I read recently, and there is certainly plenty of concern from the artists and collectors.

That said, copying is as much part of netsuke carving as it is a part of tiki - replicating old masterworks is an accepted practice. The problem with this Chinese stuff (and Indonesian, and Phillipines) is there is no real art, homage or learning process involved in its manufacture. It is soulless crap made for the cheapest price possible. These netsuke are passed from hand to hand along a factory process line, with no creative intent or inspiration behind the finished article whatsoever, and it shows. I think turning these guys onto tiki would be a bad idea, because the last thing we need is another source of cheap knockoffs copied from established tiki artists' work. Unlike many other products, we can still make a choice when it comes to purchasing art.

sushiman - a friend from my first year of carving school is a Japanese netsuke carver, and he tells me there are only about 3 or 4 guys of his generation coming through in Japan, with even fewer experienced carvers willing to teach. There are definitely many more netsuke artists outside of Japan, including here in NZ.

PS: If you're going to reply in the form of an entire quoted article, you should probably credit your source - unless you wrote it yourself?

_________________


 View Profile of Paipo Send a personal message to Paipo  Goto the website of Paipo     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
hodadhank
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Dec 28, 2005
Posts: 1689
From: Mission Beach, CA
Posted: 2008-09-21 12:30 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2008-09-21 04:54, Paipo wrote:
sushiman - a friend from my first year of carving school is a Japanese netsuke carver, and he tells me there are only about 3 or 4 guys of his generation coming through in Japan, with even fewer experienced carvers willing to teach.



Wow that's really sad!


 
View Profile of hodadhank Send a personal message to hodadhank      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
sushiman
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 28, 2007
Posts: 313
From: Kumamoto , Japan
Posted: 2008-09-21 3:35 pm   Permalink

Sad but no surprise , as more and more young Japanese mimic their western counterparts and pursue a hedonistic lifestyle whilst rejecting much of their culture and traditional arts .

What I am worried about is the future of farming here . Virtually NOBODY wants to take over their family's farm . Looks like we'll have to buy all our foodstuffs from China !

[ This Message was edited by: sushiman 2008-09-21 15:36 ]


 
View Profile of sushiman Send a personal message to sushiman      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
TikiCat7
Member

Joined: Sep 21, 2008
Posts: 5
Posted: 2008-09-21 6:42 pm   Permalink

is it made of lead and radiated with toxic waste? cause they would not be authentic chinese if they're not

 
View Profile of TikiCat7 Send a personal message to TikiCat7  Email TikiCat7     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Goto page ( 1 | 2 Next Page )
U-Moderate:
  
v1.5

[ About Tiki Central | Contact Tiki Central | Advertise on Tiki Central ]
(c) 2000-2018 Tikiroom.com (tm), Tiki Central (tm)

Credits & copyright infomation