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Tiki Central Forums Creating Tiki Tiki Carving New GREEN LAVA tiki step-by-step
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New GREEN LAVA tiki step-by-step
Basement Kahuna
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Oct 14, 2002
Posts: 3591
From: Jawja Province, Isle of North America
Posted: 2009-02-26 7:50 pm   Permalink

Nice! And authentically based, too, which is wonderful. You could teach a lot of the newer folks around here already just based on that alone. Keep up the good work.
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Jungle Trader
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2003
Posts: 3736
From: Trader's Jungle Outpost, Turlock, Ca.
Posted: 2009-02-26 8:00 pm   Permalink

Right on! Let the piece speak to you. Nice work.

 
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Aweulekuula
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Feb 11, 2009
Posts: 94
Posted: 2009-03-03 06:28 am   Permalink

Here are some of the 'Aumakua style wooden images that do not fall under the category of "Akua Ka'ai" (stick images) that I hve done over the years.


I carved this fellow almost 14 years ago. He was the first tiki I ever made and I still feel he is the most powerful one of the bunch. But back then he didn't have the facial beard pattern and the hair added to his Mahiole crest. His eyes are of pearl shell, the pupils are wooden pegs, and the teeth are made of a small shark jaw.


This is the second image I ever made, about 12 years ago. It's carved from black ebony as the corresponding Hawaiian wood is now extinct in the wild. Again, the eyes are made of pearl shell, but this time the pupils are two small palm seeds. The hair, btw, is my own.


Shortly after I made the black 'Aumakua my baby sister told me I needed to make a light-colored counterpart for it. This was the result. My sister donated her blond hair for it (It was her idea, after all), the eyes are pearl shell and palm seed and the teeth are more shark jaw.


The image of the left is a "Ki'i Wahine" carved from Ohia Lehua wood that a Hawaiian family sent me and the "Ki'i Kane" on the right was carved from red Milo wood. Both were carved about a year ago. The tongues are made of bone.


This little fellow was carved about four months ago from super-hard Arizone ironwood (all the luster of Koa or Milo but so tough you can take him anywhere and he won't break). He felt very much like a warrior, so the hair was pegged to resemble a Mahiole and he got a really big tongue (=lots of mana).

Aloha!

Marcus





 
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TikiMango
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 17, 2008
Posts: 798
From: Satellite Beach, FL
Posted: 2009-03-03 11:06 am   Permalink

Great, traditional style you have going on. These guys probably have a mana all their own.
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laojia
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Feb 04, 2009
Posts: 942
From: Metz Lorraine France
Posted: 2009-03-03 8:57 pm   Permalink

Very interesting, they look like museum pieces out of the depths of time...

 
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Heath
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Dec 31, 2005
Posts: 608
From: Suburban San Diego (The Drawer)
Posted: 2009-03-04 09:19 am   Permalink

Impressive, very impressive.

 
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seeksurf
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Sep 27, 2007
Posts: 2144
From: Buckley, WA
Posted: 2009-03-04 4:06 pm   Permalink

Great Work! you have it down those sucker on killer.

 
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drgoat456
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 28, 2008
Posts: 488
From: Tucson
Posted: 2009-03-05 08:41 am   Permalink

Really beautiful work. I live in Tucson, and Ironwood is REALLY hard. Even harder than Mesquite, which I tried to carve as my first try 'cause it was easy to get here. Quickly learned to put it aside and go with palm (you have to work at getting palm here in the old pueblo). You did a great job with it. Got a piece of milo from Maui, gonna try in a while.


 
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Aweulekuula
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Feb 11, 2009
Posts: 94
Posted: 2009-04-13 6:39 pm   Permalink

Sorry for the prolonged absence. I had three expos for healers and metaphysicists in March and there was little carving going on.

Here is some new stuff that has come about since then:



These are my two best "Akua Ka'ai", or Hawaiian Stick Images. The female (Wahine) is made from Gaboon Ebony with pearl shell eyes and a bone tongue. The male (Kane) is made from red Arizona Ironwood and pearl shell. These two are display items for my office.


 
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Aweulekuula
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Feb 11, 2009
Posts: 94
Posted: 2009-04-13 6:46 pm   Permalink



This Ki'i Aumakua was kept intentionally simple, with the facial features being abstracted to a point where only the cranium and protruding jaw are visible. It was carved two years ago and I had planned on making it more detailed, but when it reached this point an inner voice told me to stop. It was made from a piece of Hawaiian Lama wood, a wood traditionally used to creates temple inclosures or images for healing purposes. It has not been stained or treated apart from hand-rubbing and the black inclusions are a natural feature of this wood, which is in the ebony family. It is one of two images that I consider my "personal images" and I have used it extensively in Huna Healing sessions. You could say that it is a true "working tiki" rather than a display item.

It represents a more female polarity as opposed to its "counterpart".



This is the male counterpart to the previous image. This tiny piece of Ohia Lehua wood had an uncharacteristic reddish tint, which is rare in this sacred Hawaiian wood and usually infers great mana. The resulting "Akua Ka'ai" was also left purposefully simple without staining and has found extensive use in the last month and a half during healing sessions. The second of my "working tiki".


 
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Aweulekuula
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Feb 11, 2009
Posts: 94
Posted: 2009-04-13 6:53 pm   Permalink

This small 8-inch "Kii Aumakua" was carved from a more normal-colored piece of Hawaiian Ohia Lehua wood, although it too has more red in it than usually found. This one was carved for my dad for our joint trip to the Big Island this month for my official ordination as "Alakai" by Serge Kalihi King.

I am especially happy with the balance of this image as the tiny feet and hands, which are found mostly in old images rather than the modern ones, still allow this image to stand freely and without support. Also, the extremely exagerated calf muscles are also a very traditional Hawaiian features that I rarely manage to get right. Again, there was no staining or varnish, only cloth and hand-rubbing.



Above is the image without the pearl shell eyes and bone tongue to show what a difference in personality the inserts make.



Aloha!

Marcus


 
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Aweulekuula
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Feb 11, 2009
Posts: 94
Posted: 2009-11-27 11:51 am   Permalink



A black hina Ki'i Pohaku carved from shiny black basalt.


 
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Aweulekuula
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Feb 11, 2009
Posts: 94
Posted: 2009-11-27 11:56 am   Permalink



A shaman friend brought me a branch of curved red cedar and asked me to carve him a Ki'i from it. This is the result.



A Ki'i Pohaku Hina (to the left) and a Ki'i Pohaku Kane (the right).



A pair of tiny Akua Ka'ai made from Macassar (spelling?) Ebony. The Ki'i are only three inches tall.


 
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Aweulekuula
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Feb 11, 2009
Posts: 94
Posted: 2009-11-27 12:14 pm   Permalink



Three Ki'i Aumakua from Hawaiian basalt lava. One is a double-set with the pounder and pestle representing the male and the female 'Aumakua.


 
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TikiMango
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 17, 2008
Posts: 798
From: Satellite Beach, FL
Posted: 2009-11-27 2:43 pm   Permalink

All your works are great! As I said before, very traditional, and museum quality to boot. Great form.
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