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TestY
Tiki Kaimuki
Grand Member (4 years)  

Joined: Sep 25, 2006
Posts: 821
From: OAKLAND, baby
Posted: 2009-04-10 08:14 am   Permalink

Here







sothere

_________________


[ This Message was edited by: tiki kaimuki 2009-04-24 20:54 ]


 
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Tiki Kaimuki
Grand Member (4 years)  

Joined: Sep 25, 2006
Posts: 821
From: OAKLAND, baby
Posted: 2009-04-10 08:20 am   Permalink



 
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Tiki Kaimuki
Grand Member (4 years)  

Joined: Sep 25, 2006
Posts: 821
From: OAKLAND, baby
Posted: 2009-04-16 6:21 pm   Permalink








 
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Bambú Yoo-hoo
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 28, 2009
Posts: 101
From: The Nairobi Room, Umgawa Reef Motel
Posted: 2009-04-16 10:34 pm   Permalink



 
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Tiki Kaimuki
Grand Member (4 years)  

Joined: Sep 25, 2006
Posts: 821
From: OAKLAND, baby
Posted: 2009-04-23 08:25 am   Permalink

When you’re seeing 20 things at a time
You just can’t slow things down, baby
When you’re seeing 20 things in your mind
Just can’t slow things down

Then all those eyes
They’re just crowding up your human face
Then all those eyes
Take an overload

20 eyes in my head


 
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Tiki Kaimuki
Grand Member (4 years)  

Joined: Sep 25, 2006
Posts: 821
From: OAKLAND, baby
Posted: 2009-05-07 5:44 pm   Permalink

The dead will rise...



























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www.tikikaimuki.com


 
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NOTCH
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 23, 2006
Posts: 507
From: San Jose.Ca
Posted: 2009-05-08 12:10 pm   Permalink

looking good Brah!!!

 
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Tiki Kaimuki
Grand Member (4 years)  

Joined: Sep 25, 2006
Posts: 821
From: OAKLAND, baby
Posted: 2009-05-13 08:24 am   Permalink




technical difficulties require a rethink redo rerun.
I need a
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Tiki Kaimuki
Grand Member (4 years)  

Joined: Sep 25, 2006
Posts: 821
From: OAKLAND, baby
Posted: 2009-05-22 4:09 pm   Permalink

SOmeday...






Hungry?


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Jason Wickedly
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 01, 2008
Posts: 704
From: LBCTIKI
Posted: 2009-05-25 9:52 pm   Permalink

A former bootlegger during Prohibition[citation needed] he moved to Hollywood in the 1930s. Gantt opened a bar called "Don's Beachcomber" in 1934 on McCadden Place, and then, across the street, the first Don the Beachcomber restaurant in 1937. He mixed potent rum cocktails in his tropically decorated bar. This was such an escape from everyday life, it quickly gained popularity, especially with Hollywood celebrities. At "Don the Beachcomber", customers ate what seemed like wonderfully exotic cuisines, but, in actuality, were mostly standard Cantonese dishes served with flair. The first "pu pu platter" was probably served there. His Zombie cocktail (a rum drink) was served at the 1939 New York World's Fair. He also was known for creating "Tahitian Rum Punch," "Navy Grog" and many other cocktails.
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Jason Wickedly
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 01, 2008
Posts: 704
From: LBCTIKI
Posted: 2009-05-25 9:53 pm   Permalink

A former bootlegger during Prohibition[citation needed] he moved to Hollywood in the 1930s. Gantt opened a bar called "Don's Beachcomber" in 1934 on McCadden Place, and then, across the street, the first Don the Beachcomber restaurant in 1937. He mixed potent rum cocktails in his tropically decorated bar. This was such an escape from everyday life, it quickly gained popularity, especially with Hollywood celebrities. At "Don the Beachcomber", customers ate what seemed like wonderfully exotic cuisines, but, in actuality, were mostly standard Cantonese dishes served with flair. The first "pu pu platter" was probably served there. His Zombie cocktail (a rum drink) was served at the 1939 New York World's Fair. He also was known for creating "Tahitian Rum Punch," "Navy Grog" and many other cocktails.
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Jason Wickedly
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 01, 2008
Posts: 704
From: LBCTIKI
Posted: 2009-05-25 9:55 pm   Permalink

Captain William S. McCoy was a boat builder and excursion boat captain in the Daytona Beach, Florida, area from 1900 to 1920. He was also a non-drinker.

With the start of Prohibition Captain McCoy began to bring rum from Bimini and the Bahamas into south Florida through Government Cut. The Coast Guard soon caught up with him, so he began to bring the illegal goods to just outside of the U.S. territorial waters and let smaller boats and other captains such as Habana Joe take the risk of bringing it into shore.

The rum-running business was very good, and McCoy soon bought a Gloucester knockabout schooner named Arethusa at auction and renamed her Tomika. He installed a larger auxiliary, mounted a concealed machine gun on her deck and refitted the fish pens below to accommodate as much contraband as she could hold. She became one of the most famous of the rum-runners, along with his two other ships hauling mostly Irish and Canadian whiskey, as well as other fine liquors and wines, to ports from Maine to Florida.

In the days of rum running, it was common for captains to add water to the bottles to stretch their profits, or to re-label it as better goods. Any cheap sparkling wine became French champagne or Italian Spumante; unbranded liquor became top-of-the-line name brands. McCoy became famous for never watering his booze, and selling only top brands. This is one of several reputed origins of the term "The Real McCoy."

On 15 November 1923, McCoy and Tomika encountered the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Seneca, just inside U.S. territorial waters. A boarding party attempted to board, but McCoy chased them off with the machine gun. Tomika tried to run, but the Seneca placed a shell just off her hull, and Bill McCoy's days as a rum-runner were over.
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Jason Wickedly
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 01, 2008
Posts: 704
From: LBCTIKI
Posted: 2009-05-25 9:58 pm   Permalink

Captain William S. McCoy was a boat builder and excursion boat captain in the Daytona Beach, Florida, area from 1900 to 1920. He was also a non-drinker.

With the start of Prohibition Captain McCoy began to bring rum from Bimini and the Bahamas into south Florida through Government Cut. The Coast Guard soon caught up with him, so he began to bring the illegal goods to just outside of the U.S. territorial waters and let smaller boats and other captains such as Habana Joe take the risk of bringing it into shore.

The rum-running business was very good, and McCoy soon bought a Gloucester knockabout schooner named Arethusa at auction and renamed her Tomika. He installed a larger auxiliary, mounted a concealed machine gun on her deck and refitted the fish pens below to accommodate as much contraband as she could hold. She became one of the most famous of the rum-runners, along with his two other ships hauling mostly Irish and Canadian whiskey, as well as other fine liquors and wines, to ports from Maine to Florida.

In the days of rum running, it was common for captains to add water to the bottles to stretch their profits, or to re-label it as better goods. Any cheap sparkling wine became French champagne or Italian Spumante; unbranded liquor became top-of-the-line name brands. McCoy became famous for never watering his booze, and selling only top brands. This is one of several reputed origins of the term "The Real McCoy."

On 15 November 1923, McCoy and Tomika encountered the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Seneca, just inside U.S. territorial waters. A boarding party attempted to board, but McCoy chased them off with the machine gun. Tomika tried to run, but the Seneca placed a shell just off her hull, and Bill McCoy's days as a rum-runner were over.
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Jason Wickedly
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 01, 2008
Posts: 704
From: LBCTIKI
Posted: 2009-05-25 9:59 pm   Permalink

Captain William S. McCoy was a boat builder and excursion boat captain in the Daytona Beach, Florida, area from 1900 to 1920. He was also a non-drinker.

With the start of Prohibition Captain McCoy began to bring rum from Bimini and the Bahamas into south Florida through Government Cut. The Coast Guard soon caught up with him, so he began to bring the illegal goods to just outside of the U.S. territorial waters and let smaller boats and other captains such as Habana Joe take the risk of bringing it into shore.

The rum-running business was very good, and McCoy soon bought a Gloucester knockabout schooner named Arethusa at auction and renamed her Tomika. He installed a larger auxiliary, mounted a concealed machine gun on her deck and refitted the fish pens below to accommodate as much contraband as she could hold. She became one of the most famous of the rum-runners, along with his two other ships hauling mostly Irish and Canadian whiskey, as well as other fine liquors and wines, to ports from Maine to Florida.

In the days of rum running, it was common for captains to add water to the bottles to stretch their profits, or to re-label it as better goods. Any cheap sparkling wine became French champagne or Italian Spumante; unbranded liquor became top-of-the-line name brands. McCoy became famous for never watering his booze, and selling only top brands. This is one of several reputed origins of the term "The Real McCoy."

On 15 November 1923, McCoy and Tomika encountered the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Seneca, just inside U.S. territorial waters. A boarding party attempted to board, but McCoy chased them off with the machine gun. Tomika tried to run, but the Seneca placed a shell just off her hull, and Bill McCoy's days as a rum-runner were over.
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Tiki Kaimuki
Grand Member (4 years)  

Joined: Sep 25, 2006
Posts: 821
From: OAKLAND, baby
Posted: 2009-05-25 10:24 pm   Permalink

Thanks for the info...again and again.

 
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