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Tiki Central Forums General Tiki WWII - the New Guinea Campaign and images from the island
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WWII - the New Guinea Campaign and images from the island
Wayfarer
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 03, 2009
Posts: 300
From: Italy, but not by choice
Posted: 2010-02-19 03:49 am   Permalink

Where is that postcard from? The language on it looks like a (and if it's from an actual language, I apologize in advance)bad rendering of Tagalog, though those natives, even as caricatures, don't look like any Filipinos I've known.

 
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Babalu
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Nov 19, 2006
Posts: 2505
From: Lemon Grove
Posted: 2010-02-19 10:14 am   Permalink

Wayfarer, That image was propaganda from the New Guinea Campaign 1941. The only thing that it really shows for sure is the racial attitude that we had as a population back then. I believe that the written text was one artist's way of showing how natives spoke...thankfully, we've come a long way.

Quote:

On 2010-02-17 16:30, artsnyder wrote:
This entire discussion is of interest to me and to others involved in the Tiki culture, of course--if for only the fact that Don, when he invented Tiki, used the 1930s version of popular fantasizing about the people and life of the "South Seas" as the fabric on which he painted the fantasy world of Tiki.
We who enjoy the Tiki culture have truly little interest in the anthropology of Micronesia and Melanesia, except to know what was really going on there during the time of Donn's creation of our "world of fantasy and friendship" that influenced his creativity.
Or, perhaps, as the result of living in Don's world, we have become interested in the peoples and their homelands whose handicrafts (or fantasy copies thereof) we collect. The study of their history and traditions and indeed the story of their being brought into the Western world with or without their desire or permission, is a meritorious one that should be undertaken by more around the world. But it is truly not the story of Tiki.
Actually the study of WWII in the Pacific is likewise worthwhile as we learn from it the merit of bravery and heroism expressed by sacrifice in battle (eg: John Basilone). But once again, while of great interest to us as Americans and as human beings, it is not the story of Tiki.
So, with a tip of the hat to the amateur anthropologists and historians who have entertained us so much with their research and writing here, I believe that it is time to return to the world that Donn created for us, but that never existed except in our hearts and minds.




Art,

you certainly pegged me right for being a amateur historian...and honestly, I don't think one could group me in with being an anthropologist at all. I'm just an artist doing a little research for my own studio needs, and sharing some of my findings, as well as posing a few questions to my Ohana here on TC to help me down my path of discovery. I feel that this thread will in the end turn out to be helpful in someway to myself and others here. I also feel that it fits wonderfully within the context of this forum. The craft and architecture of New Guinea does have it's place within Polynesian Pop. The US troops that were stationed in New Guinea during 1941 through 1944 is in case some of the "first" real contact we had as a Nation with the Pacific Island chain "in the war effort", and it might, or might not have had some type of impact on Polynesian Pop. who knows? What I do know for sure is that questions asked in this, and all fields of endeavor is what keeps us all interested. Oh, and let's not forget rum...that probably helps to keep our interest alive as well

This thread has already helped to branched out another thread which has the potential to be one of the most interesting threads here on TC in my opinion...go to Big Bro's thread -

http://www.tikiroom.com/tikicentral/bb/viewtopic.php?topic=35535&forum=1&12

Art, you may be able to help them out some? I can't help but notice that the building in your banner here on TC has some amazing resemblances to the picture I posted prior taken in 1943 of a native New Guinea(NG)village...Are the images in your banner below vintage, or are they new?

I haven't been up to visit your restaurant since it was Sam's...I hope to make it up there soon. I hear nothing but good things about it



Taken by a solider in NG in 1943


closer view of the structures on a different image - these structures look almost new and very well constructed. It would be really interesting to find out if they were built by the war effort for the native peoples for their help?...


compared to say, these structures (image comes from the same veteran).



or, from a different source, sorry, I can't read what this card says...



Interesting couple of photos...





On a unrelated note of interest - in 1944 the USO had a tour to NG - pictured below are: Martha Tilton, Larry Adler, Carole Landis, Jack Benny, June Bruner.

The veteran who put this stuff online says "June was a concert pianist, Larry a virtuoso harmonica player, Carole a well known actress, Jack we all know, Martha was an actress and a big band singer as well. I do not know the identity of the officer greeting them." and also "Martha Tilton was a popular songstress who sang with Benny Goodman's band. Larry Adler was a harmonica player who would later get involved with the House Committee of Unamerican Activities because of his political beliefs. Carole Landis was a l940's sex symbol who committed suicide over a tragic love affair with Rex Harrison."



and..."Carole Landis got a bit of heat for fraternizing with this New Guinean Man. She was the one behind his socializing with the troupe."





Ok, I know they said it was uncomfortable over there, however, I wouldn't mind posting up in this soliders camp for a few nights...I love those old canvas tents.



This is a photo of the native "headhunters" performing for the troops -



I know it's not, but this guy looks like the Goof to me





[ This Message was edited by: Babalu 2010-02-19 10:30 ]


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Tiki Shaker
Grand Member (6 years)  

Joined: Jun 28, 2008
Posts: 706
From: Menifee, CA
Posted: 2010-02-23 10:26 am   Permalink

I've been meaning to post these for some time now (also hoping to have done more research but I haven't had the time), and I figured this would be as good a section to post them as any. Though there's nothing Melanesian influenced in here.. it definitely has the pre-tiki influence. The b/w images are two photos I purchased on ebay sometime back. The owner said they from from Camp Pendleton in Oceanside, CA. These images are of the NCO club. The matchbook is something I found later on. This is from Mathers AFB which was located in Rancho Cordova outside of Sacramento. It really makes you wonder how many military bases had this theme/influence in their drinking establishments?





















 
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Mr. Pupu Pants
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 06, 2008
Posts: 334
From: Edmonds, WA
Posted: 2010-02-23 3:38 pm   Permalink


Here's an extremely cool archive of Pacific WW2 photos (very hi res):

http://www3.uakron.edu/majuro/Tekulve/








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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11193
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2010-02-23 3:45 pm   Permalink

Great vintage photos, Babalu and Tiki Shaker, and Mr. PuPu! Love the mural, it says it all. Can you make out what was in those cages/display cases in the Bamboo Room?

I must say I have been waiting for someone to say something about this great rendering on the previous page:



and the concern by some folks that it is some kinda racist joke. I am no authority on the language of "TOK PISIN", but I knew of it, and am glad to help clear up (with the help of a few googled links) this misconception:

"Tok Pisin is one of the three national languages of Papua New Guinea. It is a form of Melanesian Pidgin English that was developed in the early 1800's as a result of increased travel and economic activity between the Melanesians and Europeans, and is still used today as one of the most dominant and universal languages in the country of Papua New Guinea. In a country that is said to have over over 800 languages still in existence, Tok Pisin is and integral part of communication for almost all native citizens."

It often DOES sound like a the cliche idea of a naive native speaking childish English, but it is a veritable language. And it DOES sound very funny, sometimes! Here, as an example, some helpful hotel phrases:

May I see the room first?
Inap mi lukim rum pastaim?

Do you have anything quieter?
Igat wanpela rum i no gat planti nois?

And here's the story of the Three Little Pigs = Tripela LikLik Pik



You can listen to it here:

http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2007/09/18/2036578.htm

Numba tu pik! Though one almost has to see the words, and then try to read them to get the funny likeness to known words.

A restaurant is called "Haus Kai Kai" , which is German/Polynesian
And then there are:

haus moni - bank (from "house money")
haus sik - hospital (from "house sick")
haus dok sik - animal hospital (from "house dog sick")
haus karai - place of mourning (from "house cry")
sit haus (rarely used) - toilet


[ This Message was edited by: bigbrotiki 2010-02-23 17:32 ]


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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11193
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2010-02-23 5:46 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2010-02-23 15:38, Mr. Pupu Pants wrote:

Here's an extremely cool archive of Pacific WW2 photos (very hi res):

http://www3.uakron.edu/majuro/Tekulve/





Indeed a great find!
The above photo shows ( L to R) Frances Langford dancing with a G.I., Jerry Colona, Tony Romano, and Bob Hope and is from that USO Unit No 130 Tour that I posted the map from earlier, and about which I posted some material from Comedian/Cartoonist Jerry Colona's book:

http://www.tikiroom.com/tikicentral/bb/viewtopic.php?topic=30132&forum=17&vpost=413413

Here is a great shot of Jerry (on the far right) with some brass (General?):





And the decor in this tent shows that it wasn't exactly "primitive art" that was foremost on the guys' minds:







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Big Kahuna
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 11, 2007
Posts: 2348
From: SoMass
Posted: 2010-02-23 5:54 pm   Permalink

Wow, Pupu, great find & that Frances Langford; VaVaVaVoom!

 
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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11193
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2010-02-23 6:17 pm   Permalink

A good occasion to dig up and honor Kailua Geoff's stellar research on her:

http://www.tikiroom.com/tikicentral/bb/viewtopic.php?topic=13970&forum=2

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Big Kahuna
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 11, 2007
Posts: 2348
From: SoMass
Posted: 2010-02-23 6:33 pm   Permalink

Cool, Bigbro! Thanks, for the link.

 
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Mr. Pupu Pants
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 06, 2008
Posts: 334
From: Edmonds, WA
Posted: 2010-02-24 11:18 pm   Permalink

Here's an original watercolor done by a well-known (then) WW2 cartoonist in 1944 (20" x 32").
I bought it on Ebay last year. Pretty cool.





 
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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11193
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2010-02-25 11:31 am   Permalink

Nice, always loved the nautical rope frame, can't have enough of that around. There was a Tiki apartment building in Santa Monica that used rope to spell its name, TIKI TU, on the side of the building.

Here's an upcoming HBO miniseries that could be good: Interviews with survivors and historic footage, too.




 
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Dustycajun
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Nov 16, 2007
Posts: 4351
From: Santa Barbara, CA
Posted: 2010-02-27 08:43 am   Permalink

I came across this old photo that has a great juxtaposition between the lone native on his outrigger and the incoming army landing craft.




DC


 
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hewey
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Sep 14, 2004
Posts: 4278
From: Sydney, Australia
Posted: 2010-02-28 04:47 am   Permalink

Interesting thread. For us Aussies, PNG and specifically the Kokoda Track is one of the KEY pieces of our national identity - in much the same way that Pearl Harbour is so important to America. Basically PNG was the last stronghold before Aussie waters - we lost that and they had a great base from which to attack us from. In fact its pretty safe to say that without the assistance of the local PNGers (still known to this day as the 'fuzzy wuzzy angels') I reckon it would have been lost.

Heres some pics of them helping transport wounded troops


This last one gives you a true indication of the kind of terrain encountered, remembering it was also hot, humid and muddy!

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MadDogMike
Grand Member (7 years)  

Joined: Mar 30, 2008
Posts: 7363
From: The Anvil of the Sun
Posted: 2010-06-13 12:44 am   Permalink

World War II bomber 'Swamp Ghost' returns to US

LONG BEACH, Calif. A B-17 bomber that lay in a New Guinea swamp for decades after being forced down during a World War II combat mission has been returned to the United States after years of salvage efforts.

The forward fuselage of the so-called "Swamp Ghost" was displayed Friday at the Port of Long Beach in an emotional, patriotic ceremony attended by kin of some of the now-deceased aircrew.

"I know this a happy day for Dick," said Linda Oliver, the 89-year-old widow of bombardier Richard Oliver, the last living crewman who died in August. She regretted he did not see the warbird's return.

"He longed for this to happen, but this wasn't to be," said Oliver, of Tiburon, Calif.

The frail widow watched a flag presentation by an Air Force honor guard and a flyover by vintage World War II fighters before her three children helped her climb steps to peer inside the fuselage sitting atop a truck trailer in the parking lot of the harborside restaurant The Reef.

The four-engine B-17E Flying Fortress was built by Boeing in November 1941, flew from California to Hawaii days after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and then island-hopped to Australia.

It went down on Feb. 23, 1942, on its only combat mission after being damaged by enemy fire during a raid on Japanese forces at Rabaul in New Britain and losing fuel.

Army Air Corps Capt. Fred Eaton piloted the aircraft to a belly landing in what turned out to be a swamp and the nine crewmen survived a six-week ordeal escaping the swamp and making their way to safety.

"Often in my life the courage and the perseverance that Dad and his fellow crew members demonstrated gave me courage to face some of the challenges we've all met in life," said the bombardier's son, Mike Oliver of Richmond, Va., who was born while his father was missing in action.

An Australian air force crew came upon the B-17 in 1972. Sustaining little damage in the landing and virtually undisturbed for years, the intact craft became coveted by salvagers of historic warplanes.

John Tallichet, president and CEO of Specialty Restaurants Corp., recounted how his father, company founder and World War II B-17 pilot David Tallichet, started efforts to recover the plane in the 1980s but didn't live to see its return. "One of his purposes in life was to bring this plane to the United States," he said.

The B-17's remote location and difficulties in gaining governmental permission to remove it from New Guinea would leave it in its watery resting place for many more years, gaining the nickname "Swamp Ghost" along the way. Westerners trekking to the site removed many items as souvenirs during that time.

The effort to bring home the plane was carried on by Pennsylvania businessman Fred Hagen, a friend of David Tallichet who has located a series of aircraft lost during World War II, leading to repatriation of missing airmen's remains.

In 2006 Hagen organized a salvage operation in which the B-17 was cut into sections that were flown by helicopter to a port. However, a dispute over authority to remove the plane held it up in New Guinea, and then its status as a warplane delayed its shipment through New Zealand, Hagen said.

The B-17 finally arrived in Long Beach last month.

Hagen said the cost of recovering the bomber was approximately $1.5 million.

It may be restored to flying condition and housed in a museum, or perhaps reassembled at less expense for display in a setting recreating the jungle swamp where it landed 68 years ago, Hagen said.

In a poignant scene, Linda Oliver, stood in front of the plane with a photo of her late husband in uniform, assisted by daughters Kathy Oliver Cataldo of Richmond, Va., and Karen Braughton of Sebastopol, Calif.



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bigbrotiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11193
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2010-06-13 08:52 am   Permalink

Very cool, thank you for that find!

Quote:

On 2010-06-13 00:44, MadDogMike wrote:
John Tallichet, president and CEO of Specialty Restaurants Corp., recounted how his father, company founder and World War II B-17 pilot David Tallichet, started efforts to recover the plane in the 1980s but didn't live to see its return. "One of his purposes in life was to bring this plane to the United States," he said.


Owner of the Castaway, Port of Call, Reef and Pieces of Eight restaurants, as we know...AND the wonderful, still existing "Proud Bird" restaurant near LAX:
http://www.tikiroom.com/tikicentral/bb/viewtopic.php?topic=28887&forum=2

Quote:

It may be restored to flying condition and housed in a museum, or perhaps reassembled at less expense for display in a setting recreating the jungle swamp where it landed 68 years ago, Hagen said.


The latter would be the way to go, of course


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