FEATURES | MUSIC | BOOKS | DRINKS | FORUMS | GAMES | LINKS | ABOUT


advertise on Tiki Central

Celebrating classic and modern Polynesian Pop
  [Edit Profile]  [Edit Preferences]  [Search] [Sign Up]
[Personal Messages]  [Member List]  [Help/FAQ]  [Rules]  [Login]
Tiki Central Forums Tiki Drinks and Food Bitters
Goto page ( Previous Page 1 | 2 )
Bitters
gabbahey
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 10, 2011
Posts: 232
From: Denver, CO
Posted: 2012-07-17 11:04 am   Permalink

I am interested in getting a bottle of these. From Gaz Regan's newsletter:


A King, a Chemist, and an Old Style Bitters New Product Crafted from Natures Most Complex Berry

New York City, July 9, 2012: Dale DeGroff (aka King Cocktail) and chemist Ted Breaux (founder of Jade Liqueurs and Lucid Absinthe) announced they will release their new handcrafted allspice cocktail bitters next month.

Dale DeGroff's Pimento Aromatic Bitters (trademark) is a revival of a style of bitters that had all but disappeared by the latter 20th century. It was created by blending Pimento berry a delightfully complex and layered spice with a hint of anise and other herbs. The result is a versatile bitters that provides a delicious compliment to many classic and modern cocktails.

Dale DeGroff's Pimento Aromatic Bitters(trademark) is produced in the historic Combier distillery (Saumur, France) by infusing and distilling a blend of select botanicals. Allspice berries provide the foundation of the flavor profile, which is layered with tropical and Mediterranean spices. The natural occurring essential oils of pimento are believed to aid digestion in traditional medicine. It is carefully crafted to enhance the flavor of cocktails without overpowering them.

"If I were trapped on a desert island and had one ingredient to mix with spirits, this would be it!" says DeGroff: "Locked in the heart of this single berry is the essence of cinnamon, ginger, clove, and nutmeg- it is a brilliant base for a cocktail bitters."

Completely artisanal in construction, DeGroff's Pimento Aromatic Bitters(trademark) is crafted entirely from whole botanicals, without commercial flavorings or artificial dyes. Use it to spice a wide range of classic and modern favorites like the Pina Colada, Painkiller, Mai Tai, the Sazerac and other whiskey cocktails, also Champagne cocktails. DeGroff also recommends adding a dash to accent straight spirits like grappa, gin, and whiskey.

We invite you to pre-order your Special Collector's Edition 250 ml Professional Bottle now. It comes in a handsome antique bottle with hand waxed top, packaged with a dripper spout. Hand signed in indelible gold ink by Dale DeGroff, can be refilled and reused. Only 3000 units available.(Price: $18.82) The 150 ml standard bottle ($9.99) will be available in September.

Order now at:
www.PimentoAromaticBitters.com

 View Profile of gabbahey Send a personal message to gabbahey      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Kill Devil
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Feb 16, 2011
Posts: 271
From: Chicago
Posted: 2012-07-18 08:07 am   Permalink

Makes me wonder if these bitters could sub for pimento dram/syrup in say, An Ancient Mariner/Navy Grog, etc? Would love to hear about any experiments

 
View Profile of Kill Devil Send a personal message to Kill Devil      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Dapuma1
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 04, 2010
Posts: 113
Posted: 2012-07-28 5:31 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2012-07-18 08:07, Kill Devil wrote:
Makes me wonder if these bitters could sub for pimento dram/syrup in say, An Ancient Mariner/Navy Grog, etc? Would love to hear about any experiments



The Navy Grog i think it is too strong of a component to just use a few drops, however what about replacing them in something the normally would use another type of bitter - like an old fashion or a manhatten - perhaps a play with bourbon?


 
View Profile of Dapuma1 Send a personal message to Dapuma1      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
arriano
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 13, 2006
Posts: 1303
From: Dog Patch - San Diego
Posted: 2013-08-01 6:23 pm   Permalink

So I posed my original question that started this thread to Robert Hess, and he was kind enough to respond:

http://smallscreennetwork.com/video/831/cocktail-spirit-captains-blood-cocktail


_________________
"I am Lono!" -- Hunter S. Thompson


 View Profile of arriano Send a personal message to arriano      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Sunny&Rummy
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 13, 2013
Posts: 534
From: Melbourne, FL
Posted: 2013-08-01 7:05 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2013-08-01 18:23, arriano wrote:
So I posed my original question that started this thread to Robert Hess, and he was kind enough to respond:

http://smallscreennetwork.com/video/831/cocktail-spirit-captains-blood-cocktail






The Captain's Blood is probably my favorite Daiquiri variation and one I only know about from Robert Hess. I have tried at least a dozen different aged rums in this cocktail, some work much better than others, but hands down the best combo so far is with Matusalem Gran Reserva 15. Even the Matusalem 18 was not quite as good.

I have also tried swapping for a couple different bitters in this one but always go back to Ango. It's funny, I have finally built up a respectable bitters collection of a dozen or so different types and it's great to mix things up a bit, but I have yet to find anything with nearly the versatility of good 'ol Ango.


 
View Profile of Sunny&Rummy Send a personal message to Sunny&Rummy      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
swizzle
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 03, 2007
Posts: 882
From: Melbourne,Australia
Posted: 2013-08-02 04:58 am   Permalink

I came home one night a little while ago after i had been in the city drinking and the only real cocktail i had ingredients for was a rum old-fashioned. I can't remember what rum i used but I didn't have any simple syrup made so i used maple syrup instead and also tried the Creole Bitters from The Bitter Truth Traveler's Set i picked up when i was in the U.S. last year. I was pleasantly surprised at how well it worked. It had a very strong liquorice/aniseed flavour which i love and although i don't think i've made one since i know it's a combination i'll be having again.

And if you've never tried one of these i highly recommend you do. It's actually surprisingly good.

Trinidad Sour

1 ounce Angostura bitters
1 ounce orgeat
3/4 ounce fresh lemon juice
1/2 ounce Rittenhouse 100-proof rye (can sub Wild Turkey 101)

Combine in a cocktail shaker and shake well with ice. Strain into chilled coupe, and stand back.


 
View Profile of swizzle Send a personal message to swizzle  Email swizzle     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Sunny&Rummy
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 13, 2013
Posts: 534
From: Melbourne, FL
Posted: 2013-08-02 05:45 am   Permalink

I LOVE that drink. Mixed it up almost as a dare when I ran across the recipe a few years ago and I was blown away. And addicted. And unfortunately that happened at the height of the Great Angostura Shortage so I did not mix up nearly as many of these as I would have if I wasn't hoarding my precious small stock of Ango like everybody else.

 
View Profile of Sunny&Rummy Send a personal message to Sunny&Rummy      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
AdOrAdam
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Jun 16, 2013
Posts: 461
From: Wolverhampton, UK
Posted: 2013-08-02 06:03 am   Permalink

This is an old post, I hope people have figured out their bitters by now - if not:

Quote:

On 2013-08-01 19:05, Sunny&Rummy wrote:
I have also tried swapping for a couple different bitters in this one but always go back to Ango. It's funny, I have finally built up a respectable bitters collection of a dozen or so different types and it's great to mix things up a bit, but I have yet to find anything with nearly the versatility of good 'ol Ango.



The experimentation is fun but I agree: for classic tiki recipes you are unlikely to best Angostura.

All the other bitters are subjective & a bit marmite (you either love it or hate it if you dont know the British expression ) You need to try them!

I drink them a lot in non-alcoholic drinks (e.g. bitters & cordial, in coke, in coffee, etc).

My emergency bitters are an opened bottle of Angostura from the 70s that I got from my parents - it tastes subtly different.

I also have 2 unopened bottles of these limited edition Angostura:



If my home bar blew up tomorrow Angostura, Peychauds, Regans & Fees Bro Aztec bitters would be on my shopping list.

I couldnt do without Angostura. I couldnt do without a Sazerac so Peychauds would be in! Regans are my preferred orange bitters because they are a bit softer than other orange bitters. Fee Bros Aztec bitters are great in an WT101 Old Fashioned & with grapefruit sours IMO

Definitely, never let them go dry!


 
View Profile of AdOrAdam Send a personal message to AdOrAdam      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Goto page ( Previous Page 1 | 2 )
U-Moderate:
  
v1.5

[ About Tiki Central | Contact Tiki Central | Advertise on Tiki Central ]
(c) 2000-2014 Tikiroom.com (tm), Tiki Central (tm)

Credits & copyright infomation