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Tiki Central Forums » » Creating Tiki » » Other Crafts » » How to become a famous artist.
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How to become a famous artist.
swizzle
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 03, 2007
Posts: 770
From: Melbourne,Australia
Posted: 2011-11-28 11:52 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2011-11-28 19:58, MauiTiki wrote:
"true Artists create for themselves, commercial artists and designers create for others".



What a great comment. I'd have to agree. If you have any creative talent/ability, creating art is just something you do because you can and because you enjoy it. Although i don't spend near enough time doing it, i enjoy painting and drawing and making tiki mugs and whatever, and will continue to do so whether i sell anything or not. A few years ago i had about 5 paintings on display in a gallery and sold 2 paintings to a couple. I covered the cost of my materials and made a few dollars profit but that was the last thing on my mind. That fact that someone (actually two people) liked my art enough to part with their hard-earned cash was an amazing feeling.

Obviously every "artist" would like to sell their work, but as MauiTiki said, unless you come up with a style that is unique and original, you may as well become a commercial artist, where you may be in demand and can make money, but then your won't really be creating art from your heart, just pandering to the requirements that your customer asks of you.

Good post Rob. Don't really like the thread though. How do i become a famous race car driver?


 
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happy buddha
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Sep 13, 2008
Posts: 185
Posted: 2011-11-29 03:43 am   Permalink

..but that suggests that commercial art, and all types of design are not 'true art'.

I know of several thousand people that would disagree w/ that


 
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swizzle
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 03, 2007
Posts: 770
From: Melbourne,Australia
Posted: 2011-11-29 04:05 am   Permalink

No, not at all. But you are visualising someones elses idea in your style. I don't have a problem with that. The question is how do you become famous.

 
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happy buddha
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Sep 13, 2008
Posts: 185
Posted: 2011-11-29 09:21 am   Permalink

But that perpetuates an archetype of a 'true (or famous) artist' being independent of the commercial or design field. That hasn't been true for about a century. Nowadays most any given artist works across several different fields, particularly if they want to make a living as an artist.

I would also say that many artists are just as well known, sometimes more so in the mainstream, for their commercial work.


 
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Zeta
Grand Member (2 years)  

Joined: Feb 13, 2007
Posts: 2049
From: Atlantis/Basque Country/Spain/Mexico
Posted: 2011-11-29 1:21 pm   Permalink

"Un pintor es un hombre que pinta lo que vende. Un artista, en cambio, es un hombre que vende lo que pinta." -Pablo Picasso

 
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atomictonytiki
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: May 14, 2002
Posts: 1275
From: Bangkok
Posted: 2011-11-29 7:13 pm   Permalink

You mustn't always believe what I say. Questions tempt you to tell lies, particularly when there is no answer. - Pablo Picasso



 
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cy
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 10, 2011
Posts: 765
From: Gresham, Oregon
Posted: 2011-12-08 7:41 pm   Permalink

A great topic Zeta! A famous musician said that his success was due to playing every venue he could- from bar mitzvahs to basements. The more you get your work out there the better your luck will be. I personally think that being 50% artist and 50% salesperson is advantageous for "making it." Viva Tiki

 
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BigToe
Grand Member (6 years)  

Joined: Nov 07, 2006
Posts: 716
From: Southern California
Posted: 2011-12-13 7:45 pm   Permalink

i love this!

Quote:

On 2011-11-25 10:49, virani wrote:
- grow a beard
- have tattoos
- have a website
- make designs for a skateboard compagny
- suck ass

- and yeah, mostly, be very good, and not a pale copyist.



Yahooo! i think i am well on my way! lets see:

-beard: check
-tattoos: check
-website: check (sort of)
-skateboards: check
-suck ass: check!!!!!!
-Very good? time will tell
-Pale copyist?: HAIL NO! VIBRANT COPYIST!!!

Seriously tho, i would say don't try to be good: SUFFER to be good. bleed, sweat and cry to be good. If you are PERSISTENT in mastering your craft, if you sacrifice your entire life to be good (and are really, really lucky), you will have success after 10 years or so.


_________________
Art for your Kustom Life
https://www.facebook.com/pages/BigToe/137801578948
http://www.etsy.com/shop/BigToeArt


 
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little lost tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 12, 2006
Posts: 7551
From: Orange,CA-right near the Circle!
Posted: 2011-12-14 10:02 am   Permalink

you forgot the most important step,Toe...
You gotta PAINT!
a LOT!
an inhuman AMOUNT!


 
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AlohaStation
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Sep 27, 2004
Posts: 2112
From: So FL
Posted: 2011-12-14 10:30 am   Permalink

OK - now I know what the problem is.

-beard: nope
-tattoos: no
-website: check (sort of
www.tflounder.deviantart.com)
-skateboards: no
-suck ass: nope
-Very good? for others to judge
-Pale copyist?: I'll never tell

Quote:

On 2011-12-14 10:02, little lost tiki wrote:
you forgot the most important step
You gotta PAINT!
a LOT!



I don't paint.

I have always liked to think of myself as In-Famous!


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Swamp Fire
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 31, 2003
Posts: 1089
From: Long Beach, CA
Posted: 2011-12-14 12:04 pm   Permalink


Toe, don't famous artists have paint in their beards?

How to become a “Famous” artist? Maybe it should be How to become a ”Successful” artist.? If it’s fame you seek put your kid in a weather balloon and act like you had no idea he was in the balloon as it floats away, video taping the whole thing. Fame is an empty goal to strive for, especially as an artist.

Found this article on the internet...

Hobbyist, Amateur, or Professional Artist - Which are You?

You finally made it! You have a solo show at a prominent gallery that only represents top-earning artists. The room is full of excitement and the spotlights showcase your art spectacularly. The gallery staff did an outstanding job of displaying your work, and it looks absolutely stunning. Friends, collectors, and art world glitterati surround you.

It’s been such an exciting evening as you watched the “red dots” going up to indicate that most of the works in the room are already sold. These pieces sell for five and six figure prices, so this is quite a triumphant night for your art career. On top of that, you’ve had a couple of requests for interviews to feature you and your career in internationally celebrated art magazines.

The best part is the beaming faces about you—all your loving and supportive friends toasting your success with such delight. You made this happen. You created this art career for yourself through your hard work, talent and business acumen. “Great job!” you think to yourself. “Great job!”

Does this scene sound anything like your own dream? Can you see yourself there, or does it seem more like an impossibility?

It may be a long way out from where you are right now, but it can happen and it is a reality for many artists. As you might expect, though, there is a logical progression and a fair bit of work to becoming a successful artist.

Hobbyist, Amateur, or Professional

The first thing to understand is the difference between being a hobby artist, an amateur artist, and a professional artist.

As you read through the descriptions below, be honest with yourself. Once you recognize where you are starting from, it becomes obvious what to do next.

Are You A Hobbyist?

Hobby artists may spend years, decades, or even an entire lifetime making art strictly for personal pleasure. They want no responsibility for a business. They don’t desire to develop a following, sell their artwork, or try to support themselves with their artwork.

Hobbyists want to make art that they enjoy, whenever they feel like it. They may take art lessons, but they have no commitment to professionally developing their skills. They simply want to create, without turning it into work.

Are You an Amateur Artist?

At some point, the hobbyist might realize that this is an awfully expensive hobby and maybe they ought to think a bit about putting together some sort of business—at least so they could deduct the costs on their taxes.

Over the years, they’ve become quite skillful at art. Family and friends rave about how wonderful their work is and frequently say, “You should try to sell this.”

Or maybe their spouse is bugging them about the cost of their hobby and suggesting that they should consider doing art as a business. Whatever the case, they set up a business, sell a few pieces of art, and deduct their expenses. This is so exciting that they want to do more, and decide to become even more serious about their art.

Amateurs are willing to sacrifice their personal time in the pursuit of making art and selling it, but they’re usually not sure how to really make it pay.

Do You Want to Be a Professional Artist?

As their confidence and skills grow, amateur artists may start to seriously consider art as a profession. They like the money they make from selling their art and it’s great to deduct the costs at tax time. After expenses, they’re actually making profit!

With this may come a driving need to make a living solely from their art. Some artists start to do all sorts of random art marketing and jump at every “opportunity” that comes their way, whether or not it makes financial sense.

They may spend most or all of their art income taking art classes, yet never come up with a clear idea about what is required to make a living making art. All they know is that it is time to find out how to succeed in the art world.

Unfortunately, many artists eventually give up because they cannot detect a path to succeed. Since they don’t have a road map, they can’t follow through on doing what is necessary. These artists spend their time in unproductive activities. You don’t have to be one of them.

If you decide to go ahead and move from being a hobbyist to an amateur, you don’t have much to lose if it doesn’t work out. You can always go back to being a hobbyist. If you want to move from being an amateur to a professional artist, you are making a much bigger commitment.

I work with many artists who work part-time or full-time and who also make a substantial portion of their living from their art. Because they aren’t worried about their finances, many of them feel less pressured and are able to be more creative in the time they set aside for their art career. Having health benefits from employment is also a major factor, especially for artists with families.

What It Takes to Move From Hobbyist to Amateur

When you decide to move from being a hobbyist to an amateur, you must choose to give up some of your other pursuits, or the time you used to spend simply “doing nothing.” You need disposable time, energy and money to become a better artist. You give up free time to work on learning and practicing your art without expectation of being reimbursed.

If you are an amateur, you may well be just as talented as professional artists. But by staying an amateur, you have the luxury of working at your art when it suits you. You can take workshops to guide your exploration of making art, and have mentors to critique your work. When you improve, you can simply enjoy it, because your livelihood doesn’t depend on always improving.

On the other hand, if you are an amateur and you choose to stay an amateur, you will probably give up many chances to show your work and you will miss out on feedback from a wider audience. You will probably also never be well-known, or get paid what your artwork is truly worth.

What It Takes To Move From Amateur to Professional

If you decide to move from being an amateur to a professional artist, you must love doing what you do so much that you are willing to do it almost all of the time.

In fact, you must be prepared to use most of your time, energy and money to make a living from your art. You’ll also need to develop a unique style and constantly develop your body of work.

Perhaps you will need to teach others what you know as part of your strategy to become more visible and to make money. Without a doubt, to be financially successful you must be an entrepreneur with art as the core of your business.

To remain competitive in the art world, you should also invest in ongoing professional development, whether in mastering your medium, navigating the art world, or just doing business. You will also need to be willing to promote your work every chance you get.

These days, I often tell people who are considering the move into a professional art career not to quit his or her day job just yet. It’s a big decision and not one to be taken lightly. You don’t want to have regrets when you do, and you certainly don’t need more debts.

Put together an “exit strategy” first while you build a solid foundation for your successful art business. Plan out how you’re going to get where you’re going.

And when you have that solo show, make sure to invite me!

by Aletta de Wal


_________________



The Art of Doug Horne
http://www.swampfirelounge.com/


 
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little lost tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 12, 2006
Posts: 7551
From: Orange,CA-right near the Circle!
Posted: 2011-12-15 09:49 am   Permalink

there's NOTHING in there about growing a beard! What gives?


 
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BigToe
Grand Member (6 years)  

Joined: Nov 07, 2006
Posts: 716
From: Southern California
Posted: 2011-12-15 09:52 am   Permalink

Cant i bypass the hard work part and just skip right to the GALA opening part? that is what i do best.

and the ass-sucking.


 
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The Sperm Whale
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 23, 2004
Posts: 1546
From: Lakewood California
Posted: 2011-12-15 09:56 am   Permalink

I didn't see any of my suggestions, either? Hmph

 
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