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Tiki Central Forums Tiki Drinks and Food any ideas for substitute for Benedictine?
any ideas for substitute for Benedictine?
thePorpoise
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 23, 2011
Posts: 1173
From: Tampa Bay
Posted: 2012-03-10 12:32 pm   Permalink

I have yellow chartreuse, the aroma seems similar...

I want to make an Oh Henry cocktail...

anybody have a go-to substitute?


 
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kid_dynamo
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Oct 13, 2011
Posts: 42
Posted: 2012-03-10 6:01 pm   Permalink

I imagine that yellow chartreuse would be an acceptable substitute. They are certainly in the same family of drinks, though I don't have any currently on hand to test this theory out (perhaps you could spread a little of that $40 a bottle love around).

They are both made by monks after all...


 
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CincyTikiCraig
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 31, 2009
Posts: 368
From: Cincinnati, Ohio USA
Posted: 2012-03-10 7:55 pm   Permalink

Use another multi-herbal liqueur like Chartreuse (yellow is the closest, followed by green), Strega or Izarra. Many claim that Drambuie makes a good substitute for Benedictine, but I can't picture that working. Who knows though.


 
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thePorpoise
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 23, 2011
Posts: 1173
From: Tampa Bay
Posted: 2012-03-11 10:55 am   Permalink

well i indeed used the yello chartreuse, and the drink was fantastic!

better than with the benedictine i must say. i wonder if the same would hold true for other drinks calling for benedictine. (the only ones i can think of that i periodically make are the singapore sling, and several n'awlins drinks such as the vieux carre...)


 
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thePorpoise
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 23, 2011
Posts: 1173
From: Tampa Bay
Posted: 2012-03-11 10:57 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2012-03-10 18:01, kid_dynamo wrote:
(perhaps you could spread a little of that $40 a bottle love around).





my bottles of green and yellow chartreuse are so dusty i think they cost me in the $30 range back when i bought them. i've seen the green in some shops these days for $60-- i wonder if i can sell my open bottle for a profit?





 
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sjbellos
Member

Joined: Oct 17, 2013
Posts: 1
Posted: 2013-10-17 08:21 am   Permalink

Anyone know what you can substitute green chartreuse with? I have a recipe that calls for green chartreuse and liquor stores in PA don't carry it.

 
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AceExplorer
Grand Member (3 years)  

Joined: Apr 03, 2008
Posts: 944
From: Deep in the Jacksonville Florida jungle.
Posted: 2013-10-17 09:33 am   Permalink

Substitute for Green Chartreuse? Hmmm... First-hand I can definitely tell you that the only direct substitute I personally know of is the green and yellow liqueurs produced by the Cloister Ettal in the Alps of southern Germany. But Ettal products are darn near impossible to find in the US - their entire annual production is likely consumed by the locals and I don't know if any is ever shipped overseas. However there are several things which you might find interesting and possibly helpful:

1) My personal observation, from travelling around parts of Europe and trying several versions of this stuff, is loosely that many monasteries, abbeys, cloisters, etc. made liqueurs very similar to the popular Green Chartreuse and Yellow Chartreuse from France. It seemed to me as if this sort of flavor blend was extremely popular as a way for these religious orders to earn or supplement income over the last 3 or 4 centuries. I am under the impression that the base recipe may have been traded around, and that it therefore also varied slightly from place-to-place and perhaps even from season-to-season. Somehow the French version became the predominant brand on the global market in the 20th century. But given this history, there are likely many similar liqueurs out there.

2) If you can't find a substitute in the US, then it might help to continue your search by first classifying the green liqueur primarily as "herbal liqueur" and then secondarily by a primary characteristics such as "minty" and also perhaps "sweet." Depending on your personal taste, you will likely find a options and, among them, possibly a very similar substitute.

3) Drive to a neighboring state and pick up a bottle, or mail-order Green Chartreuse. It's in the US, a bit pricey per bottle, and a little goes a long way in any cocktail. But this little list would not be complete if I didn't include these suggestion. Hopefully you live within driving distance of a good liquor store in a neighboring state. Or maybe you have friends in adjacent states where they can ship you a bottle. (I'm assuming you've already done a Google search, and that Pennsylvania does not allow shipments of spirits into the state.)

I hope you find this info helpful. If nothing else it gave me a few minutes to think about and share a few of my experiences with Green and Yellow Chartreuse (and similar liqueurs) over the years. They're generally quite strong herbal liqueurs in a similar way to how Pernod is a very strong flavor.







 
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AdOrAdam
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 16, 2013
Posts: 397
From: Wolverhampton, UK
Posted: 2013-10-17 12:22 pm   Permalink

Having just took a swig of Benedictine to remind myself: to me it tastes like sweetened brandy with a hint of Underberg digestive bitters

I would not have come to that conclusion in the past regarding Benedictine but I only had an Underberg the other day so the taste is still fresh in my mind!

Try shot of brandy, teaspoon of gomme (for sweetness & texture), maybe 1 - 3 drops of Underberg - I'd think it would be similar
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