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Tiki Central Forums » » Collecting Tiki » » Help Identify, What Is This, Is This A? Thread
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Help Identify, What Is This, Is This A? Thread
Atomic Tiki Punk
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Joined: Jul 19, 2009
Posts: 5868
From: Costa Misery
Posted: 2013-12-15 3:46 pm   Permalink

I can only say it resembles a tribal ink application tool
for Tattooing, Just an educated guess though.


 
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Bay Park Buzzy
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Joined: Apr 07, 2006
Posts: 2828
From: West Bay Park, San Diego, CA
Posted: 2013-12-15 5:45 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2013-12-15 09:20, bigbrotiki wrote:
..where did you get the term "whakapokoko" from? From this book? :

The illustration above makes it sound like whakapokoko is an area, or a place, not a type of carving. I could not find the term in the online Maori dictionary, and have not seen it as a term in any Maori carving books before.




You just don't have the right books:



Now, you have!
Buzzy Out!
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rustyblitzen
Member

Joined: Dec 14, 2013
Posts: 5
Posted: 2013-12-15 7:51 pm   Permalink

To Bay Park Buzzy,
What would the title of that book be so that I might (potentially) use it in my project?
Also, thank you to everyone on this thread for this incredible feedback, my project is almost done, as I'm making conjectures on this object in regards to the nature of "tapu" and "mana" as well as debunking the myth of historical Maori cannibalism, whilst making an argument for the transfer of mana of defeated foes, such as bone fishing hooks and the like.

(I'm in the midsts of revising my paper as I type as it's due tomorrow.)
Although, best of luck to this forum for developing your own theories as to the nature of this object!


 
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nui 'umi 'umi
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Joined: Feb 21, 2011
Posts: 1013
From: La Mirada Atoll
Posted: 2013-12-15 11:30 pm   Permalink

I can’t find the book or even recall the name but I got the impression that “whakapokoko” is a village or region such as the lower “Sepik” region in PNG. At first I thought rusty b’s object was a “godstick” but the serrations on a human fibula left me puzzled .

 
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nui 'umi 'umi
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Joined: Feb 21, 2011
Posts: 1013
From: La Mirada Atoll
Posted: 2013-12-15 11:31 pm   Permalink



[ This Message was edited by: nui 'umi 'umi 2013-12-15 23:31 ]


 
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Atomic Tiki Punk
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Joined: Jul 19, 2009
Posts: 5868
From: Costa Misery
Posted: 2013-12-15 11:59 pm   Permalink

Whakapakoko is a (carved figure)
The figure appears to be "Rongo" the god of agriculture

From:
http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/object/12000/whakapakoko

"This Whakapakoko atua (god stick) is believed to represent Rongo,
the god of agriculture. These sticks were often located near gardens of Kumara(sweet potatoes).
They were protective talismans to ensure plentiful crops."

(None of the images of Whakapakoko atua I found had serrated or two prong ends
most are knife like & made of wood, since many Maori Tattoo tools are made from bone
I can't rule out that this is still not the intended use.)



[ This Message was edited by: Atomic Tiki Punk 2013-12-16 00:02 ]


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tikicoma
Grand Member (3 years)  

Joined: Jan 16, 2010
Posts: 368
From: wakinekona
Posted: 2013-12-16 12:21 am   Permalink

I'm wondering if this might be a Whakapapa Rakau?



"This intricately carved stick was was used as aid to learning names of ancestors, each one was represented by a carved knob."
Those I saw on the web were wood not bone though, and more finely carved.

aloha, tikicoma


 
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bigbrotiki
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Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11095
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2013-12-17 04:03 am   Permalink

Thanks Buzz and ATP for getting the intel - me can't know everything!

 
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rustyblitzen
Member

Joined: Dec 14, 2013
Posts: 5
Posted: 2013-12-17 12:21 pm   Permalink

Hi All!
It appears as though this object is not related to whakapokos at all, but is in fact a bone fork.
There's not many references to them within the archaeological record, except via I.W. Keyes A Ceremonial Bone Fork, A Little Known Artefact Type, Supplementary Records on Bone Forks (1969, 1976, 1980), and an article by W.J. Phillips 1955 which has descriptions, depictions, and an evolution of these kinds of forks from the pre-contact era onwards.
I would post these documents, but I fear they might be part of international copyright; that said, one can check out them via Inter-Library Loan.
Thank you all everyone!




 
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bigbrotiki
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Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 11095
From: Tiki Island, above the Silverlake
Posted: 2013-12-18 07:21 am   Permalink

Aaaah, good to know! I wonder if it actually could be called a bone fork'n'knife, as the serrated edge makes it look like a cutting tool?
Any research insights on that?

Quote:

On 2013-12-14 16:18, rustyblitzen wrote:




 
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spy-tiki
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Joined: May 11, 2003
Posts: 731
From: glendale, ca
Posted: 2014-03-13 8:05 pm   Permalink

Just trying again to see if there's any info about this. Recognize the type of figures? Is this style identified with a certain culture or island? Do you think it's just tourist crap?

Quote:

On 2013-09-29 16:19, spy-tiki wrote:
A friend of mine has this silk print. It's about 37"x59". His mom bought it for him about 2 decades ago when she was on a Hawaiian & Tahitian cruise. There doesn't seem to be an artist signature or any tag with a brand. Touristy kitsch or treasured artifact? Any ideas?





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martinisandmore
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Oct 23, 2013
Posts: 17
From: Mike
Posted: 2014-03-16 10:20 am   Permalink


Any idea who made this solid yellow parrot mug? It appears to be the same mold from the Hawaiian Cottage parrot and I know OMG made them.I know it is not the newer Dynasty Wholesale do to the crazing on the bottom and the quality of the glaze.
Mahalo


 
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swizzle
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 03, 2007
Posts: 833
From: Melbourne,Australia
Posted: 2014-03-16 7:53 pm   Permalink

Scored this carving today from a workmate who found it tucked in a corner of a block of units where his girlfriends mum lives. It's obviously been outside for a while because of how weathered the front of it is but other than a little rot on the base it's in pretty good condition. Anyone have an idea of its possible age and/or origin. I've had a couple of people say Hawaiian, one said from Fiji and someone else said from Bali. Most people do seem to think it is from the 60's or 70's though, so it does make it quite old.




 
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Atomic Tiki Punk
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 19, 2009
Posts: 5868
From: Costa Misery
Posted: 2014-03-16 8:23 pm   Permalink

It sure looks like a Balinese Demon mask on the body of a traditional Hawaiian Tiki
not traditional in any way with that head.


 
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forgotten tikiman
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 18, 2011
Posts: 471
From: Forgotten Tiki Room. Pismo Beach, CA
Posted: 2014-03-16 8:45 pm   Permalink

Hey Swizzle! That Ku carving is interesting. I have a vintage Tongan carving that is similar but it's more of the traditional Ku style. No fangs, but it has that similar horn design on it's head. Tongan natives carved Ku images cause that is what sold with tourists.

 
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