FEATURES | MUSIC | BOOKS | DRINKS | FORUMS | GAMES | LINKS | ABOUT


advertise on Tiki Central

Celebrating classic and modern Polynesian Pop
  [Edit Profile]  [Edit Preferences]  [Search] [Sign Up]
[Personal Messages]  [Member List]  [Help/FAQ]  [Rules]  [Login]
Tiki Central Forums Creating Tiki Other Crafts Making Pendants on your computer
Goto page ( Previous Page 1 | 2 | 3 Next Page ) Remove Highlighting
Making Pendants on your computer
tigertail777
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Nov 25, 2004
Posts: 665
From: Oregon
Posted: 2012-07-12 04:04 am   Permalink

Very cool tutorials Gene, thanks for sharing! If you did a negative version, would it be strong enough to use as a mold for clay? If so, then using that service you mentioned could actually become cost effective by having molds printed and then making clay versions from the mold. It's a thought anyways.

 
View Profile of tigertail777 Send a personal message to tigertail777  Email tigertail777 Goto the website of tigertail777     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
LoriLovesTiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 03, 2011
Posts: 839
From: NJ
Posted: 2012-07-12 11:24 am   Permalink

Gene,

thanks for the tutorial and the pictures! If you're selling those pendants please let me know how much. I really like them.

Lori
_________________
:-)
Lori


 
View Profile of LoriLovesTiki Send a personal message to LoriLovesTiki      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Gene S Morgan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2011
Posts: 342
From: Midwest the navel of the USA
Posted: 2012-07-12 8:24 pm   Permalink

Whystler ... wish I could afford my own printer too. What kind of materials can you print with on yours? Is it all plastics?

Tigertail .... If you were carful you could make plaster molds. You would have to make sure your sculpt did not have any undercuts. My demo here has too many undercuts to reproduce that way. I used to do ceramics and made some of my own molds. Wendy has had some good demos on how to do it. As you will see I did the same thing using rubber molds and resin .....


Lorilovestiki .... I'm really glad you like my pendant. This one was a demo and I have not tried to have it 3D printed yet. My wife has and Esty shop and has started adding some of my tikis to it. I hope to have more in time. She sells them for $12 each plus shipping. Her shop is at: esty.com/shop/morgancreativedesign. She is just starting out so there is not a lot in it yet but there is more to come .... Thanks for checking out my thread.


 
View Profile of Gene S Morgan Send a personal message to Gene S Morgan  Email Gene S Morgan Goto the website of Gene S Morgan     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Gene S Morgan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2011
Posts: 342
From: Midwest the navel of the USA
Posted: 2012-07-12 8:38 pm   Permalink

The first photo in this thread is of a number of pendants I have made in the manner I have demonstrated. But then again they are different. Those are made from the first sculpt that I had produced by ShapeWays. That sculpt was different in several ways. I was experimenting. There are several things to think of when sending to ShapeWays. As Whystler mentioned earlier in this thread, there is a cost consideration. ShapeWays charges by size and volume and what kind of material is used. Got to keep the price down, so keeping the thing as small as possible is what you gotta do. Also, ShapeWays has limits set on how thin they can be depending on the material used. I kept trying to make real thin ones to save money and kept getting them rejected by them. This image is of the first one they accepted.




You can see that this not as tiki looking as most tiki lovers would like. I was trying to be kinda tiki and experimenting with what could and couldn't be done. Some details like the small teeth and those thin ridges on the chin were added to test how well the 3D copy could produce small detail. Whystler mentioned in his thread about the difficulty of trying to reproduce deep cuts and overhangs. I made the mouth somewhat deep and the nose with a slight overhang.






OK, I promised to talk about other easier ways to do this whole process. The way this pendant was done was by starting with something other that a sphere. It is easier if you start with a flat medallion like object. I have tried many ways and many other 3D programs to do this. Some worked, and some not so good. This one was produced on an Ipad app and transferred to my PC. It is a clunky app, but it does a nice job of producing a rough medallion.






As you can see, we already have a hole and a flat back. It makes all the sculpting easier and no cutting up in MeshMixer. The only trouble is the depth of your carving is kinda limited. You can see that my demo model has more form and shape than this one. It is a good way to start though.






So I sent off my obj file and it was accepted and 10 days later this is what came in the mail. Nice detail. I liked it. It is a nice fairly hard surface white plastic. The surface is nice and would be perfect to paint as Whystler has demonstrated in his thread. You may notice there is a wavy texture on the surface. I do not know why, but after awhile I got to liking it. I thought it looked like wood grain. This model is 2 inches high and 1 inch wide. It cost me $11.24 to have made including shipping. I wanted to have a whole bunch and did not want to spend that kind of money. The obviously answer to my problem was to make copies.








 
View Profile of Gene S Morgan Send a personal message to Gene S Morgan  Email Gene S Morgan Goto the website of Gene S Morgan     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Gene S Morgan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2011
Posts: 342
From: Midwest the navel of the USA
Posted: 2012-07-12 8:54 pm   Permalink

You start with a box a little bigger than your model. Using hot glue you attach your model to the bottom of the box. (Remember when I said a flat bottom was what you wanted. Now we know why. I tried this with a non flat model and the glue gave out and before the mold set it floated up to the top) Spray some sealer and mold release.






The mold stuff (I think that is the scientific name) comes in two different color which you mix together.





You mix them together and mix until it looks kinda purple.




Slowly pour it over your model .. I used to do this kind of thing years ago and I must say they have really improved the mold making material over the years.






This is what the mold looks like with the original on top. Using the hot glue made it easy to get the model out of the box. You can see that the mold is a little rough around the back edge. That is because I am lousy with a glue gun and I got too much glue on and the pendant was raised up a bit and I had to cut it out. In the end that worked out because it allowed me to make slightly thicker pendants if I wanted to.

That is all I have time for now .. the next time I will finish up with casting and finishing the pendant.






 
View Profile of Gene S Morgan Send a personal message to Gene S Morgan  Email Gene S Morgan Goto the website of Gene S Morgan     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Whystler
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Jul 07, 2012
Posts: 41
Posted: 2012-07-12 10:39 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2012-07-12 20:24, Gene S Morgan wrote:
Whystler ... wish I could afford my own printer too. What kind of materials can you print with on yours? Is it all plastics?



Hi Gene - yes it's all plastics. But they are not always oil based. You can use PLA (poly lactic Acid) filament, which is made with corn. I have not used it extensively, but it comes in many cool colours, including a sparkly attempt at gold. The neat thing about using the PLA is that is smells a bit like cooking rather than burnt plastic when you print with it.

-Whystler


 
View Profile of Whystler Send a personal message to Whystler      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
AlohaStation
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Sep 27, 2004
Posts: 2135
From: So FL
Posted: 2012-07-13 08:47 am   Permalink

How much time and expense was there just to get the pendant produced to this point (modeling, exporting and printing)?



 
View Profile of AlohaStation Send a personal message to AlohaStation  Goto the website of AlohaStation     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Gene S Morgan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2011
Posts: 342
From: Midwest the navel of the USA
Posted: 2012-07-13 6:21 pm   Permalink

Whystler ... I like the idea of plant based plastic .... It must give you the munches when your printing and it smells like cooking.

AlohaStation .... As far as the time goes, I had to experiment a lot before I got things right. But, I can sculpt a piece and get it ready to send in a couple of hours or so. The cost for this pendant was actually a little higher than I first reported. I did not include the shipping as stated, so it actually came to about $17. Trying slightly smaller sizes can knock that cost down a bit. The longest time was waiting for it to come in the mail. I think Shapeways' gets pretty busy sometimes and it took nearly a week before they printed it. They send you an E-mail when it goes into production. It was just about exactly 10 days from me sending it to them until I got it in the mail.


 
View Profile of Gene S Morgan Send a personal message to Gene S Morgan  Email Gene S Morgan Goto the website of Gene S Morgan     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Gene S Morgan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2011
Posts: 342
From: Midwest the navel of the USA
Posted: 2012-07-13 6:32 pm   Permalink

I want to make a whole bunch of these pendant thingies. Lets mix up some resin. You stir together two clear liquids.






When it gets hot (you will know) pour it into you rubber mold. Do it slow.






The hardest part of casting resin is getting the bubbles out. You will see that I did not always get the job done. One thing that seems to help is to gently blowing on the resin. No, your are not cooling it. It is the carbon dioxide in your breath that helps disperse the bubbles. Once it starts to harden, it quickly turns white. You can pop it out of the mold after about 20 minutes.






This is what we end up with. It is pretty close to the model. Because of the overflow in the mold I have to clean the back edge a bit. I sand the back and roughen it some to get a better painting surface.





 
View Profile of Gene S Morgan Send a personal message to Gene S Morgan  Email Gene S Morgan Goto the website of Gene S Morgan     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Gene S Morgan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2011
Posts: 342
From: Midwest the navel of the USA
Posted: 2012-07-13 6:45 pm   Permalink

OK, here it is. A dark base paint is applied. Then we dry brush a lighter color on to bring out the detail and texture. A light clear satin coat is sprayed on. A leather chord and it is ready to wear.

If you look close you can see what bubbles do. In a couple of places (like the teeth) there are tiny round holes in the surface. Not many, but they tend to be in areas where the detail is thin or recessed. I have convinced myself that this adds to the rustic funkiness of the pendant. Every one is a little different due to this.






That is pretty much the whole story. This is the second pendant I made. I think it looks more tiki. We experiment with different color combos.






I was going for an ivory or bone look for this one.






I kinda go the opposite direction from most folks in painting. Instead of antiquing I like to dry brush. Close up, it looks a little sloppy, but I think it brings the texture out more and I love the texture.

Well that's all I got. I gotta say I have been thinking of doing this tutorial for awhile now but last year when I first posted here on Tiki Central it was in a thread about computer graphics and there seemed to be a bit of a backlash at the thought of using a computers in designing tiki. I check in here a lot but don't post. I want to thank Whystler for starting his thread. It pretty much inspired me to post this tutorial. Hope it was helpful and thanks to all who dropped in and commented and gave me encouragement.









 
View Profile of Gene S Morgan Send a personal message to Gene S Morgan  Email Gene S Morgan Goto the website of Gene S Morgan     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Gene S Morgan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2011
Posts: 342
From: Midwest the navel of the USA
Posted: 2012-09-06 7:02 pm   Permalink

I thought I would post a little update to this thread. I wanted to show the final pendant made from my tutorial. Also Whystler has given me some new ideas on surface treatments for my tikis. On his sculpts he sprayed on a base coat and then antiqued them with a darker color. He convinced me that using outdoor paints (they sell under the name Patio Paint) made it possible to eliminate the step of a final protective clear coat. I must admit that I like the look of a clear coat, but sometimes it come out just too shinny. This image is of three pendants with the two on the left without a clear coat and the one on the right with one. I've got to say that the far right tiki is one of my favorites. It has a complex multi-color finish with a semigloss sheen over it. It is very unique looking. The first one had a base coat of an automotive primer which was antiqued with black. The middle one had a base of a matte ivory paint sprayed on with an antique of dark brown. On both of them I did a fine dry brush of a slightly lighter color to make the texture pop.





 
View Profile of Gene S Morgan Send a personal message to Gene S Morgan  Email Gene S Morgan Goto the website of Gene S Morgan     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Gene S Morgan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2011
Posts: 342
From: Midwest the navel of the USA
Posted: 2012-09-06 7:06 pm   Permalink

This closeup of this tiki shows how the matted surface makes the pendant look almost like carved lava stone.









 
View Profile of Gene S Morgan Send a personal message to Gene S Morgan  Email Gene S Morgan Goto the website of Gene S Morgan     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Gene S Morgan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2011
Posts: 342
From: Midwest the navel of the USA
Posted: 2012-09-06 7:10 pm   Permalink

Antiquing and dry brushing can produce a variety of surfaces. The center one was rubbed extra hard to give it an old and worn look. I know many people want their tikis to have a simple finish, but I can't help liking more colorful and rustic looks.







 
View Profile of Gene S Morgan Send a personal message to Gene S Morgan  Email Gene S Morgan Goto the website of Gene S Morgan     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Gene S Morgan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2011
Posts: 342
From: Midwest the navel of the USA
Posted: 2012-09-06 7:14 pm   Permalink

This tiki had a gray base coat with a black antique. I dry brushed several green tints over that. I put up this closeup so folks could see how dry brushing creates a very natural looking patina. Sorry the image is a little blurry.






 
View Profile of Gene S Morgan Send a personal message to Gene S Morgan  Email Gene S Morgan Goto the website of Gene S Morgan     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Gene S Morgan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2011
Posts: 342
From: Midwest the navel of the USA
Posted: 2012-09-06 7:17 pm   Permalink

On the pendant made from the tutorial I decided to try something different. My original tikis were about 2 inches long. They looked good that size on a leather cord. I made these last two about half that size because I wanted to see how they would look on chains more as jewelry. I did similar color finishes as I did on the larger ones.








 
View Profile of Gene S Morgan Send a personal message to Gene S Morgan  Email Gene S Morgan Goto the website of Gene S Morgan     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Goto page ( Previous Page 1 | 2 | 3 Next Page )
U-Moderate:
  
v1.5

[ About Tiki Central | Contact Tiki Central | Advertise on Tiki Central ]
(c) 2000-2014 Tikiroom.com (tm), Tiki Central (tm)

Credits & copyright infomation