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Tiki Central Forums Creating Tiki Other Crafts Glaze question
Glaze question
LoriLovesTiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 03, 2011
Posts: 948
From: NJ
Posted: 2013-04-10 6:46 pm   Permalink

Glaze aficionados, I have a question....

Can I mix a clear transparent glaze with an opaque glaze to create a semi-transparent one? At school we have a ton of clear glaze but no transparent or semi-transparent glazes and I'm looking for a glaze that pools and darkens in the crevices of my piece. Is this a horrible idea?

The only place to get glaze that I know of within driving distance is Utrecht and I can't find ceramic glaze on their website although allegedly there is a catalog at my school. I'm on the hunt but considered the above as I was searching through our glaze selection today.

Mahalo in advance!
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Lori


 
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Trader Tom
  

Joined: Jan 26, 2006
Posts: 825
From: Hillsboro, OR
Posted: 2013-04-10 6:56 pm   Permalink

Different brands of glazes can mix together for wildly different results. I think your best bet is to do a test tile and see what happens.

 
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VanTiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Nov 25, 2005
Posts: 1033
From: Hawaii
Posted: 2013-04-10 7:07 pm   Permalink

I second the above - Glaze does not mix like paint, as it it requires a chemical change to take place in the kiln to show true color - mixing elements from different glazes can cause totally unexpected reactions. Sounds like you are looking for a celadon type glaze. Many manufacturers offer a recipe (or two) at varying temperatures. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celadon

As mentioned above - testing is the key to glaze success. Best of luck!

Henrik "VanTiki"
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swizzle
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 03, 2007
Posts: 878
From: Melbourne,Australia
Posted: 2013-04-10 8:35 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2013-04-10 19:07, VanTiki wrote:
I second the above - Glaze does not mix like paint, as it it requires a chemical change to take place in the kiln to show true color - mixing elements from different glazes can cause totally unexpected reactions.



That's so funny. I was speaking to one of the guys at my ceramic supply place just yesterday about trying to achieve a particular colour and he said literally the same thing.


[ This Message was edited by: swizzle 2013-04-10 21:37 ]


 
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MadDogMike
Grand Member (7 years)  

Joined: Mar 30, 2008
Posts: 7397
From: The Anvil of the Sun
Posted: 2013-04-10 9:32 pm   Permalink

Lori you can also experiment with clear glaze and Mason stain but again, it's likely to be unpredictable. My nearest glaze and clay outlet is 120 miles away. I usually make it over a couple times a year to pick up 25 lb bags of clay and gallons of casting slip because shipping is prohibitive. But shipping on a pint of glaze is reasonable and it will probably take less time than to test out several combinations and firings to get the look you want
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danlovestikis
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Jun 17, 2002
Posts: 4964
Posted: 2013-04-10 9:37 pm   Permalink

http://www.nmclay.com/nmclay.htm

MadDogMike told me about this company and I've been ordering glazes from them ever since.
Ducan glazes that start with IN and then a number are the ones that seep into the crevasses and show detail.

I'm looking forward to more of your projects. Wendy
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GROG
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Jun 21, 2006
Posts: 6915
From: Tujunga
Posted: 2013-04-11 03:21 am   Permalink

You can also do a wipe. Put the color of glaze (or underglaze for bisque) you want on your bisque, let it dry, and then use a wet sponge and lightly take it off in the high areas, and it will stay pooled in the low areas. Then put clear glaze over and fire.

This bowl has a dark wipe over a matte glaze. GROG glaze the bisque with Duncan Courtyard Glaze called Mediterranean Olive, but it didn't show the detail as well as GROG was hoping after it was fired. So GROG put on a darker glaze color and wiped it off, so that the dark glaze was only in the lower detailed areas. Put clear glaze over everything and fired again, and was much happier with the results.


This Ape mug has a yellow underglaze on the fez that went onto the greenware and then was fired. Then a watered-down black glaze was applied to the whole thing. It was wiped off all the fez except for the tassle and the band, and it was wiped off the face. A semi-transparent blue glaze was sprayed over the top of everything to give it the blue tint, and fired again.


You can also water down your glaze and brush it on your bisque. That way you get some glaze in the high areas, but a lot of the pigment will pool in the low areas. If it's watered down enough it will be matte if you want a matte finish. But, if it's not watered down enough it will be matte in the high areas and shiny in the low areas where it pools. Put clear glaze over the whole thing. The clear glaze will also make it more contrasty between the light and dark areas.

This Moai mug has a very watered-down black glaze over the whole thing. (You have to hold it so the color pools in the lower areas as you brush it on) It's a glossy black glaze, but it's so watered-down when it's fired it's a matte finish.


The same thing was done to this bowl. There are more layers applied to the bowl part than the Moais and rocks, and the bowl has clear glaze over it so it is glossy, and the Moais are matte.


 
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LoriLovesTiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 03, 2011
Posts: 948
From: NJ
Posted: 2013-04-11 4:14 pm   Permalink

Thanks everyone for taking the time to answer my question with so much information! You are all so knowledgable and talented, I am humbled by your kindness.

I am going to check out that website, Wendy and GROG your pictures were so helpful. I tried to wipe away glaze on my turtle platter for the art swap with mixed results. You're VERY good at it!

Mahalo,
Lori


 
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danlovestikis
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Jun 17, 2002
Posts: 4964
Posted: 2013-04-11 5:44 pm   Permalink

Thank you GROG, you taught me a lot too. Wendy

 
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swizzle
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 03, 2007
Posts: 878
From: Melbourne,Australia
Posted: 2013-04-11 6:25 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2013-04-11 17:44, danlovestikis wrote:
Thank you GROG, you taught me a lot too. Wendy



What Wendy said.


 
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