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Tiki Central Forums » » Creating Tiki » » Other Crafts » » Painting and Sculpting Tiki on the iPad and other crazy stuff
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Painting and Sculpting Tiki on the iPad and other crazy stuff
Gene S Morgan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2011
Posts: 342
From: Midwest the navel of the USA
Posted: 2013-07-17 6:44 pm   Permalink

Another angle and lighting. Something that sets this app apart from all other sculpting apps is that it has a built-in menu that allows you to send your file to to a 3D printer. AutoDesk has some kind of deal with a company called Sculteo which will take your 3D file and make a 3D print of it. Anyone who might have followed my 3D printing thread from awhile back will realize that this is so much simpler than the method I explained for doing the same thing on the computer. If you want to get a little more info on that you may want to check out that thread at: http://www.tikiroom.com/tikicentral/bb/viewtopic.php?topic=43359&forum=18&hilite=sculptris
So if you make a cool tiki sculpture on an Ipad you can have that turned into a pendant with just a tap of the screen.



I thought I might get this sculpt made into a pendant. I uploaded it to the Sculpteo site and got this screen which showed me what it would cost to have it printed. As you can see the price was $57.22, a lot more than I wanted to pay. The price they charge is based on size and volume. The smallest size they print at was 1.4 inch by 1.33 inch by 2.33 inch. I decided that I had to do something to reduce the volume of my sculpt.



The first thing I did was flatten the back so it wasn't a log anymore. Using the carve tool I dug out the back so it was more like a mask.



Using the smooth tool I cleaned up the hollow back area.



When I turned the sculpt on it's side I noticed that I was loosing detail. I guess I smoothed too strong and the front side got distorted in the process.



Using the grab tool I pulled some of the detail back into the sculpt. Since I thought I might end up making a cast of the final digital print I shaped areas like the nose and mouth so they would not have overhands making casting difficult.



All that shaping kinda made the image look quite different. I thought I would give it a try anyway.



I took a couple of snaps in the render window to recheck the shape.



Another angle.



In the main menu you go to the “Order a print” section.



When you get to Sculpteo you name your sculpt and upload it.



As you can see while the height and width is about the same, the thickness was reduced to half. That brought the price to less than half as well. I decided to try some more.



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Gene S Morgan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2011
Posts: 342
From: Midwest the navel of the USA
Posted: 2013-07-18 9:58 pm   Permalink

I did it different this time. I created a hollow bowl first and then sculpted it.



I guess I got the walls too thick and the price was still too high.



This strange guy is actually the first sculpt kinda squeezed together and hollowed a bit more.



The price went down even more.



This little guy is even too strange for me. I created him by decreasing the diameter of the original log and hollowed it out again.



With both the width and thickness decreased I got a price I could live with.



Using the same method as the last image I created this guy.



I ordered a 3D print of this one. I will let you know how it looks when I get it.




 
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Gene S Morgan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2011
Posts: 342
From: Midwest the navel of the USA
Posted: 2013-07-21 6:21 pm   Permalink

As I have said before, with digital images you are never really done until you decide you are done. With these digital sculpts you can save them as image files and treat the images just like you would any other image. This is another of my Ipad pages. On it there are a large number of apps that can add after effects to any image. Digital art gets a bad name because there are many effects out there that can mimic natural art. Some folks just apply a filter that, for instance, makes your image look like a watercolor, oil paint, or a pencil sketch. My approach is just the opposite. I try to make images that are very hard or impossible to create with natural media. I think digital is a new media and should be explored digitally in new ways.



This is the same image I displayed in the earlier part of this post. I played with color a bit and came up with something I kinda liked.



Next I posterized the image a bit. This reduces the color level and adds some interesting shaping and color levels. I love texture, so I overlayed some grungy textures over the image.



Playing with contrast, saturation, and brightness makes things pop a bit.



Some new color and texture adds add interest. You can do this all day, but with the right apps, it won't take near that long.



Hey, want another size or shape, no problem. There are limits to this kind of distorting. Too much and pixels start stretching and looking weird. And, the image starts looking too distorted and crappy. Next I will show you some of the apps I use to get these kind of effects.




 
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danlovestikis
Grand Member (6 years)  

Joined: Jun 17, 2002
Posts: 4790
Posted: 2013-07-21 8:40 pm   Permalink

Very good. The tiki with the body reflects how I feel if I eat too much. I really like the textures. The way you make these digitally is so much like sculpting that I'd like to see you do one in clay too. Wendy
_________________


 
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Gene S Morgan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2011
Posts: 342
From: Midwest the navel of the USA
Posted: 2013-07-22 9:27 pm   Permalink

Thanks much Wendy ... I sure wish I could still work with clay ... I have so many ideas I'd love to try ... Gene

 
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Gene S Morgan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2011
Posts: 342
From: Midwest the navel of the USA
Posted: 2013-07-22 9:44 pm   Permalink

As I said there are many apps that can be used to filter, change, and add effects to an image. PhotoStudioHD is a good example because it has a bunch of preset filters which you can fine tune, and also allows for many basic adjustments as well. I started by posterizing the image, and then used an antique filter to change the color and tone.



Some slight extra texture is added. Notice how the the sculpt looks completely different. By combining many different effects and paying attention as you go you can develop looks and styles that are all your own.



I added some texture and filtered the colors again. This is called experimenting or just playing around and exercising your imagination.



Is it art? I'm sure someone will say it's not, but it sure looks good to me.



You may notice I like texture. I add some texture overlay to many of my images. It does not have to be strong or over the whole image. I like to make my own texture, but this app called GrungetasticHD (such clever names?) makes the process easier. You can have a couple of textures at a time each with different colors and intensity.



Rough edge framing is a nice effect to add some pop to your image.



I decided I wanted brown instead of green. Easy to do, and I intensified the color as well. I came up with several possible final images with this experimenting. With filtering you can either start with an idea and use your knowledge of filtering to accomplish that idea. Or, as I have done here you can just play until you find something you like. It is possible to go too far and mess things up. That is why I save image files as I go along in case I need to go back to some point and try something different. Of course experimenting and just plain fooling around is important to learning the process and developing your own style.




 
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Gene S Morgan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2011
Posts: 342
From: Midwest the navel of the USA
Posted: 2013-07-23 8:26 pm   Permalink

Just because I create on the Ipad does not mean I have to stop with the Ipad. I have been a Photoshop user for decades. There are other computer programs I find very useful in creating images, but Photoshop has a huge collection of tools that are very useful. There is a bit of a learning curve with the program, but you don't have to be an expert to learn many of those tools. You can learn enough to get the job done. This image was completed in Photoshop from an Ipad sculpt. My goal was to get a digital ceramic glaze effect. I love the rough texture. That's my thing.



I use some of my own created filters and other folk's too. This is a very versatile bamboo filter that a talented filter designer from Filterforge made. I also like the hand drawn old book illustration effect that I used on the tiki. I have created several filters that produce a similar result.



I worked pretty hard to perfect this ceramic glaze look on this tiki, It required several different filter effects and color and tone adjustments. This is what I mean by my trying to develop a true digital style that cannot be created with real world tools. Back in the days that I worked in clay I designed many glazes in trying to produce complex and interesting surface treatments. I never came up with anything that came close to the pattern and color detail that I accomplished on this tiki. I love it when I get it right.



This look is a combination of texturing in the 123D Creature app and a number of enhancements in Photoshop. Floating in space, it is an interstellar tiki.




 
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Gene S Morgan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2011
Posts: 342
From: Midwest the navel of the USA
Posted: 2013-07-24 8:04 pm   Permalink

This is what the Photoshop program looks like. It's an Ipad sculpted tiki ready for a little computer work. If I haven't mentioned it before, when you see that checkerboard pattern it means that there is no background in the image. I saved it that way on purpose so I could concentrate on the tiki alone. It will be easy to add a background later.



I decided to do a ceramic glaze look on this tiki. I have mentioned FilterForge several times. It is a program that runs inside Photoshop that gives you tools to design your own filters and create original effects. Ceramic glazes are best when they break up on the clay surface producing pattern and texture. Well OK, those are my favorites anyway. I thought I would make a simple filter for adding colored texture to the surface of my tiki.



This is what Filterforge looks like inside. There are many nodes or components available that you can hook together in various ways to get something done. There are only a few nodes in this simple filter, but you can have hundreds that can be combined many ways to create effects. In this filter there are two different noise modules that are processed in different ways and blended together and layered over the tiki image. You end up with multicolored patterns applied to the tiki.



Like I explained before in the Sketchclub app, layers can be a powerful tool in digital graphics. In this case in Photoshop I made a copy of the tiki image and combined it back together using one of the layer modes. I will not go into too much detail because it becomes kinda technical, but layer modes is a great and simple trick to do great stuff. What I was doing here is what was once called (back in the KPT days, but that is a long long story) color contrast. Normal contrast just affect the black and white aspects of and image. This method changes the contrast of all colors and seems to sharpen the image in the process. In the end my applied texture become stronger and that is what I'm looking for.



I did another layer trick to lighten the colors. Graphic processing programs and apps have a “lighten” or “brighten” effect. The only problem with doing that is that those effects mostly work by adding white to the colors. The colors easily become washed out that way. By using a screen mode in layers you change the tone of each color producing a lighter image and keeping the color from being washed out.



The saturation control makes all the colors stronger. I use it a lot. If you intend to print your images they always look better with more saturated colors.



I ended up sharpening the image a bit. From the beginning I intended the tiki to looked like glazed ceramic. My favorite glazes have always been glazes that break up and have patterned surfaces. In the real world there are certain materials that are added to glazes to get that effect. (rutile, ash, crystals,etc) In the digital world all you need is some Photoshop magic. (or one of the other image processing programs and apps that do digital magic)



 
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Gene S Morgan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2011
Posts: 342
From: Midwest the navel of the USA
Posted: 2013-07-25 8:54 pm   Permalink

I talk about using texture all the time. I am addicted to texture, but so are many artist. Texture shows in the kind of paints used, how they are used, and also in what the image is painted on. Canvas, wood, gesso board, all give texture to what is painted on them. Digital texture can be anything. I scratch textures on paper and scan them. I scan real world stuff from motel room walls to coffee spills. And, there is a lot of software out there that can produce random textures. That is where this one came from.



This is the same texture tiled to make it smaller. If you have been following this thread for awhile you may remember my use of tiled texture in my fabric patterns. The advantage of computer based textures is that they can be seamless, meaning that a strong seam line will not show when they are tiled.



This is another example of a FilterForge filter. You can't see much because of the size but you can see that it is more complex than the other one. This filter is much about texture. It allows several textures to be overlayed on the image using different colors and contrast. I'm still working on this filter. Not sure how much more it will do when I'm done.




Remember this guy? He has been what I have been using as a test image for this new filter. Yep, my texture is in there somewhere. I like the way he turned out. I don't know how other folks feel, but I find the modern world amazing. You can start with a sculpture. Change it to an image. And, using many complex tools and a little imagination end up with an impressionistic almost work of art.( I say almost because I'm not really an artist you know) You do all this digitally ….Amazing. And, my hands are still clean.



I was going to throw this guy away, but he looked so primitive. Well, I guess that is OK, primitive is what it's all about. Gave it some filter magic and I grew to like it.




 
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Gene S Morgan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2011
Posts: 342
From: Midwest the navel of the USA
Posted: 2013-07-28 7:07 pm   Permalink

Posing sculpts at different angles and with different lighting can sometimes inspire ideas about how to finish an image. I saw a kind of spookiness with this tiki. I actually experimented with different ideas of color, contrast, and texture looking for the perfect mood. Things transitioned from first brown and then purple and finally some deep reds. Each addition of color and texture with more and more contrast began to swallow the tiki into an abstract world. In the end the tiki became a ghost image floating in a fantasy fire texture. Can you believe that is the way I imagined it?












 
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Gene S Morgan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2011
Posts: 342
From: Midwest the navel of the USA
Posted: 2013-07-29 8:03 pm   Permalink

The same tiki as the last, but different angle and lighting. My eye and mouth treatment on this tiki gave great opportunity for a strong and primitive look. The final image here is all about layering. Some texturing of course, and posterizing was added to two different colored images. Then the two were combined using layers. In the end you get the color of one image combined with the rustic texture of the other. You get a kind of rustic abstract impressionism. It comes close to my intended goal of producing a new kind of digital style that does not try to mimic natural real world media.











 
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tigertail777
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Nov 25, 2004
Posts: 670
From: Oregon
Posted: 2013-07-30 01:54 am   Permalink

Hey Gene, been following along off and on for a while I dig your experiments. I normally come pretty close to abhorring digital art because it tries to mimic tools that it can never really look exactly like and people rely far too much on digital tools. But I appreciate and understand that you are trying to push digital to become it's own art form ( I have to say that I liked your handmade clay pieces you posted a while back better, but that is my own personal prejudice showing through.) I gotta say you are very prolific and continue to work hard at evolving the fledgling digital art form and I admire your tenaciousness. Looking forwards to seeing how your 3D printer pieces come out.

 
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Gene S Morgan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2011
Posts: 342
From: Midwest the navel of the USA
Posted: 2013-07-31 9:47 pm   Permalink

Tigertail ... Thanks much for checking out my weird stuff .... I do really understand peoples feelings about digital graphics. It is hard to try to do art that does not get your hands dirty. Pushing pixels is not the same as squeezing mud. The real world can be very satisfying. If I could I would still be sculpting in clay, but I was a Syfy reader in my youth and was ready for a personal computer 20 years before you could actually buy one. I'm an old guy, but never had the fear of, or distaste for, the computer age that other folks do. I guess that is why I started these threads. Just trying to get other folks as excited as I am about digital possibilities.

I will post images when I get my 3D print back, but this new company has turned out to be not as easy to work with that Shapeways was. They are so slow. My wife keeps promising me a 3D printer of my own for Christmas. If that happens I will become an even more annoying poster than I already am (I have some crazy dreams about about 3D printed mugs) ...... Gene



 
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Gene S Morgan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2011
Posts: 342
From: Midwest the navel of the USA
Posted: 2013-07-31 9:58 pm   Permalink

Well this goes way back. This is the island image I made early in this thread to demonstrate creating your own brushes in Sketchclub. I added a little sunset to the landscape and then brought a couple of sculpted tikis in. I used quite a bit of HDR (high dynamic range) filtering to produce the final image here. Strong HDR produces the effect of super detail and contrast. It is a kind of too real reality. It immediately gave me the feeling of an old hand colored postcard from bygone days. So I gave it some texture and color manipulation to age it. It looks like it was found all dirty and bent up in the bottom of and old lost steamer trunk.
















 
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hiltiki
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Joined: Jun 10, 2004
Posts: 3109
From: Reseda, calif.
Posted: 2013-08-01 08:21 am   Permalink

I like this one.





 
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