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Tiki Central Forums Creating Tiki Other Crafts Danish Modern inspired stereo cabinet with lighted puffer fish
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Danish Modern inspired stereo cabinet with lighted puffer fish
Greg_D_R
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 22, 2011
Posts: 113
Posted: 2014-06-13 11:46 am   Permalink

Most of the furniture in my basement rec room is vintage 60s. It's not so much a tiki bar as a tiki home theater. One notable exception was the Target bookshelf that served as an equipment rack, and it had been bugging me for some time. Danish modern stereo and record cabinets are beautiful, but they tend to be low and wide, and space is limited.There were features that I liked in various bookshelves and record cabinet pictures online: beveled front frame, indented H leg base, tambour doors.


My first thought was the brass capped straight legs, but then I saw a record cabinet with the H base, and fell in love with it.

Not sure where this display area idea came from, aka 'the dry aquarium', but I thought of it, and stuck with it.






I drew some sketches, figured some dimensions, even did a quick 3d model and tested the leg base idea in pine, then set it aside for almost 2 years.

About 6 months ago, I got around to getting started. The challenge: combine several distinctive features from those inspirations, and make a cabinet that suits my space.




Lots of carpentry firsts for me in this project: dado joins, dowel joins, tambour, routing, and freehand jigsaw cuts, plus stain and clearcoat.

The tambour doors for each shelf are made from half-round red oak dowels, glued to a cut up pair of bluejeans. Everything I know about making tambour, I learned from Sandor:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WEla47R_m9k (I think the Nosferatu fingernails are optional.)

The leg base, front frame, and shelf fronts are red oak, cut from one piece of S2S lumber from a local hardwood lumber yard. The rest of the case is 3/4 birch plywood from Lowe's. No screws or fasteners other than glue and dowels were used in the case itself, just in attaching the rope light and the pull handles. The pull handles are cut down wood ring mandrels. None of them match.

The tambour door tracks had to line up from shelf to shelf as closely as possible, so they would open and close smoothly. The template for the door tracks was a big nylon cutting board purchased on Amazon.

The bottom shelf has a taller front and a false bottom with space to run cords for the puffer fish, which are on a dimmer circuit, along with the string lights around the perimeter of the room.


The doors have front and back stops, so they can't open too wide, and can't close past the centerline.


I've got a thing for colored lights. Naturally, in addition to the puffer fish lights, the waves design in the lower display part of the case, ended up with LED rope lighting. You can get RGB rope lights from China by way of ebay, that come with a controller and a remote control.

This allows you to set different custom colors, or pick a large number of preset colors, and fade from color to color.


Removable inner panels conceal the back of the tambour doors. The RGB rope light also runs around the back of the cabinet.

(Sorry about this huge image)

Equipment: My table saw is a portable job site saw on a DIY stand between two picnic tables. This allows me to rip full size sheets of plywood with no problem. All cuts were done with the table saw or a jigsaw. Sanding was done by hand or with an electric mouse sander. Doweling jigs were a must, one for end joins, and one for corners. Cordless drill. 8 corner clamps, 5 bar clamps, and a couple of wood clamps. Lots of Titebond II wood glue.


Challenges: Almost every large piece of wood in this project warped to some degree after cutting, sides and front frame especially. I got most of it out through clamping, but rest assured that it doesn't suffer from being excessively straight or square in any dimension. Call it Danish Modern Primitive.









Overall, I'm happy with how it turned out. It's stable, sturdy, maintains the tiki asthetic, and keeps the tech gear hidden within reach.

[ This Message was edited by: Greg_D_R 2014-06-13 11:49 ]


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Bora Boris
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2005
Posts: 2594
From: Boogie Wonderland
Posted: 2014-06-13 11:48 am   Permalink

Amazing!

 
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TikiAno
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 07, 2012
Posts: 885
From: San Diego, CA
Posted: 2014-06-13 12:56 pm   Permalink

Beautiful work- thanks for posting. I really do appreciate furniture construction here in the "Other Crafts" thread, so much more appropriate than in the Home Bar thread (to me, at least).

Great construction, look forward to seeing more furniture builds...


 
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Atomic Tiki Punk
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 19, 2009
Posts: 6246
From: Costa Misery
Posted: 2014-06-13 1:00 pm   Permalink

Damn cool, very nice job!

 
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Greg_D_R
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 22, 2011
Posts: 113
Posted: 2014-06-13 1:02 pm   Permalink

Thank you all very much. It's good to be appreciated by the tiki people. Hopefully it shows what you can do with less skill than stubbornness.

 
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tikilongbeach
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 05, 2011
Posts: 1379
From: Long Beach, CA via Dallas, TX
Posted: 2014-06-13 1:09 pm   Permalink

That is very cool! Thank you for sharing.

 
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Humuhumu
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 22, 2002
Posts: 3623
From: San Francisco
Posted: 2014-06-13 1:37 pm   Permalink

Gorgeous! Beautiful work, great concept, and well executed. Thank you for sharing it!
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Critiki - Ooga-Mooga - Humu Kon Tiki


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Sophista-tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Sep 13, 2005
Posts: 1729
From: Seattle WA
Posted: 2014-06-13 2:23 pm   Permalink

super neat! plus I have furniture clamp envy.

 
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Greg_D_R
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 22, 2011
Posts: 113
Posted: 2014-06-13 2:30 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2014-06-13 14:23, Sophista-tiki wrote:
super neat! plus I have furniture clamp envy.



LOL, I am thinking of Craigslisting all these bastards. The corner clamps are great, but they take up a lot of space, and I'm not sure when I'll do anything this elaborate again.


 
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hang10tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2010
Posts: 4049
From: Las Vegas
Posted: 2014-06-13 3:11 pm   Permalink

Now that's kool

 
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LoriLovesTiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 03, 2011
Posts: 946
From: NJ
Posted: 2014-06-13 5:56 pm   Permalink

Very, very cool!

 
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hiltiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 10, 2004
Posts: 3155
From: Reseda, calif.
Posted: 2014-06-13 8:12 pm   Permalink

Just beautiful.

 
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tikiskip
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 26, 2005
Posts: 2912
Posted: 2014-06-14 09:36 am   Permalink

Great job on this Greg!!
Like the way you did the wood on the bottom.
Looks like that old Walltex I think they called it, you know
the stuff they used on Heywood-Wakefield.

I'm a clamp hound, you can never have too many.


 
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Greg_D_R
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Apr 22, 2011
Posts: 113
Posted: 2014-06-14 09:58 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2014-06-14 09:36, tikiskip wrote:
Great job on this Greg!!
Like the way you did the wood on the bottom.
Looks like that old Walltex I think they called it, you know
the stuff they used on Heywood-Wakefield.

I'm a clamp hound, you can never have too many.



Thanks man! Getting praise from the craftsmen on Tikiroom means a lot. Funny thing about that texture, it's actually individual dowels glued and clamped to the surface. Total pain in the butt, but it matches the tambour, so in my mind I had to do it, instead of just finding a textured material.


 
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tikiskip
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 26, 2005
Posts: 2912
Posted: 2014-06-14 10:59 am   Permalink

"it's actually individual dowels glued and clamped to the surface. Total pain in the butt, but it matches the tambour, so in my mind I had to do it, instead of just finding a textured material"

Well that's not cheap.


 
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