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Tiki Central Forums Home Tiki Bars Need help renovating home tiki bar!
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Need help renovating home tiki bar!
freestylpolaris
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Jul 17, 2014
Posts: 23
Posted: 2014-07-17 07:43 am   Permalink

Hey everyone! I just bought a home tiki bar and I am trying to figure out how to renovate it. It looks like it has been worn out from the sun. I need a cost effective method and some design tips. Right now I am leaning towards making the main poles darker than the paneling on the sides and front. Here are my questions:

1) Would heat treating it with a blowtorch work since the bar is older and is all different shades already?

2) If I cannot heat treat it is sanding and staining my next option? I looked up prices for stainer and it get pricey so I would rather heat treat if possible.

3) Was 400.00 a good deal for this? I need to know if I should try to return it or not.






 
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freestylpolaris
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Jul 17, 2014
Posts: 23
Posted: 2014-07-17 12:10 pm   Permalink

I found this thread:

http://www.tikiroom.com/tikicentral/bb/viewtopic.php?topic=41376&forum=20&57

If I sanded and then used shellac would that work?

[ This Message was edited by: freestylpolaris 2014-07-17 12:10 ]


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Pele Paul
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Aug 26, 2008
Posts: 606
From: San Dimas, ca
Posted: 2014-07-17 1:12 pm   Permalink

I found that same bar minus the roof and two poles! Found mine on the side of the street, and had to disassemble it to get it home. its well made and really sturdy, so Id say yes its worth saving. I used varnish remover, cleaned it up and have since used the pieces for another project. if you can get the old varnish off, it should be no problem to re-varnish it and enjoy it for a long time

 
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Atomic Tiki Punk
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 19, 2009
Posts: 6099
From: Costa Misery
Posted: 2014-07-17 1:29 pm   Permalink

If you do torch it, let us know how it turns out?

 
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freestylpolaris
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Jul 17, 2014
Posts: 23
Posted: 2014-07-17 1:43 pm   Permalink

Pete Paul: I do not even think there is varnish left on it. It is pretty worn. I am more concerned about making it look vivid, lively, and colorful again. Wouldn't the varnish happen after sanding and staining to bring out the shine? The plan right now is to use an amber, Red mahogany, or clear stain once sanded then apply a varnish or wax.

Atomic Tiki Punk: Will do. I plan on taking after pictures of course I will most likely flame treat it once I sand and stain it.

[ This Message was edited by: freestylpolaris 2014-07-17 13:45 ]

[ This Message was edited by: freestylpolaris 2014-07-17 13:49 ]


 
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Atomic Tiki Punk
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 19, 2009
Posts: 6099
From: Costa Misery
Posted: 2014-07-17 3:29 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2014-07-17 13:29, Atomic Tiki Punk wrote:
If you do torch it, let us know how it turns out?



That was a joke, I really "don't" recommend you do that with this old bar
unless you want a bonfire, considering the shape it is in, $400 sounds pretty high
but with some sanding & a refinish it could look sharp again.

Never torch wood after stain or varnish has been applied!
in the words of the Great Cornholio "FIRE,FIRE!"

[ This Message was edited by: Atomic Tiki Punk 2014-07-17 15:33 ]


 
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freestylpolaris
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Jul 17, 2014
Posts: 23
Posted: 2014-07-17 3:36 pm   Permalink

I thought stain & varnish are non flammable once dry? & all other tiki bars this size were in the 1000.00 range so i thought it was a decent deal. Idk though now haha

[ This Message was edited by: freestylpolaris 2014-07-17 15:52 ]


 
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VampiressRN
Grand Member (7 years)  

Joined: Nov 23, 2006
Posts: 5750
From: Sun City Lincoln Hills (NorCal)
Posted: 2014-07-17 11:48 pm   Permalink

Visions of a pile of burned $400 popped into my head when you mentioned torch. Keep us posted as you work on your project, I think sanding and staining it dark would be good, but I am not an expert. Best of luck, I think it will be a beautiful piece when done.
_________________
"Oh waiter, another cocktail please!!!"


 
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freestylpolaris
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Jul 17, 2014
Posts: 23
Posted: 2014-07-18 12:29 am   Permalink

Ok. Fire curing is out of the question now :] I agree that with a little bit of work this piece can be restored and look great. I was thinking about using a dark stain like red mahogany on the main support beams and then a slightly lighter stain for the front and side paneling. What do you think? Another alternative I was thinking of was using amber on the main support beams and then clear on the main and side paneling. Otherwise I am just going to stain it all one color. Please let me know if you have any suggestions about design!

Also, could someone please give me some tips on sanding and staining bamboo/rattan? I have never stained anything in my life so starting with this project is going to be a tough way to learn. It sounds like I just have to sand and apply several coats of stain with a brush or sponge. Has anyone stained for outside use and have a recommendation on types to use?

1) water or oil based? (leaning towards water since easier cleanup and non-flammable)
2) what looks best: transparant, semi-transparant, solid (leaning towards semi-transparant to restore color while still showing off the bamboo)
3) What type of stain should I use for outdoor on bamboo/rattan? Shellac, varnish, polyeurthane, varnish? (Sounds like a varnish stain might be most resistant to outdoor weather)


Here is an example of a design I am considering. Just look at the very front counter. I would make the support beams that darker color of the supporting wood and I would make the front and side panels that lighter amber color.



Here is another example of something similar that I might go with. That amber/orange color for the paneling with the darker color for the poles and countertop:



If anyone knows the exact stain colors of any of the images please let me know. Otherwise I am bringing in the pictures to home depot and relying on them.





[ This Message was edited by: freestylpolaris 2014-07-18 00:34 ]

[ This Message was edited by: freestylpolaris 2014-07-18 00:45 ]


 
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Lodge 9
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Mar 22, 2010
Posts: 38
From: Wylie Texas
Posted: 2014-07-18 04:37 am   Permalink

Use a good wood cleaner on it first. you can get the flood wood cleaner it will help remove the gray and discolored marks. make sure you rinse it with water and let it dry. (the cleaner is made for decks and fences).sand it,
burn the nodes on the bamboo before staining.
use a oil Stain it will penetrate better and look natural. (solid stain is opaque and will look like paint)
top coat with an Polyurethane Spar Varnish for exterior use. several coats works best.
Take some scrape wood and put some samples on it to see what you like. if you go to a paint store they will help you.
looking forward to your progress pic's


 
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tikiskip
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 26, 2005
Posts: 2834
Posted: 2014-07-18 05:40 am   Permalink

Where are you located?
If you are in a dry area using stain or varnish may work for some time.
But I gave up putting bamboo or rattan outside as I live in Ohio and it rains a LOT
here so that's rot city no matter what you do.

This bar will never look pretty, I think of tiki bars as having a pretty and or gritty look.
For me the gritty look is best as it's way more easy for one thing because all the stuff
in your bar is going to age and get that gritty look on it's own especially outside.
IF you want a pretty bar outside your going to need to redo the bar every now and then
no matter if your area is wet or dry.
Too much work I say.

So why fight it, your bar has the gritty look many work hard to get that look in their tiki bars.
You may want to go gritty look and just spray the thing with a clear coat of a weather proofing
of some sort and be done.(at most a new top maybe)
I would not give this a burn as it would mess up that cool beachcomber look.
This protectant will need to be redone every year or two.
(But it will be an easy quick spray job, not a long stain varnish job)
That's the way I would go.

It's a cool bar, if you like it then the price was fine. (could not buy the stuff to build it with for that)
Put some tiki, lights and a few drinks on it and it will look way cooler.

Good Luck!


 
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tikiskip
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 26, 2005
Posts: 2834
Posted: 2014-07-18 07:51 am   Permalink

One more thing, here is some Wangi bamboo that I put shellac on and sealed about a year or so ago.
Next photo is how it looked when first done.

Also if you want to know how your bar will look with stain, shellac or varnish ect...
Do a test, take some of the bamboo off of the top on the far right side in the back, pieces you
won't see, and do tests on them.

Burn one shellac one varnish one on and on.
Then you will see what out come you will get.

Let us see what you come up with so others can learn form this.



Here is a post from 2007 where I talk about that burn don't burn and shellac.
http://www.tikiroom.com/tikicentral/bb/viewtopic.php?mode=viewtopic&topic=18485&forum=18&start=60



-=*=--=*=--=*=--=*=-Google "Tiki bar lights" To find TIKISKIP-=*=--=*=--=*=--=*=-

:-:*''""*:.-::-**-::-:*''""*:.-:



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freestylpolaris
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Jul 17, 2014
Posts: 23
Posted: 2014-07-18 09:07 am   Permalink

TikiSkip: I am located in IL so it rains a fairly decent amount but I am putting it in between two trees in a very shaded area. It will receive no direct sunlight which will prevent color wearing and rain exposure will be to a minimum since the trees above will divert the water away (plus the roof of the bar will help too). There is also a fence directly to the left which will prevent rain from that direction and I am planning to cover it during winter. If everything is applied correctly I should get at least two years out of it before a re-finish would be needed again which I would not mind doing.

You are right about the gritty look though. I cannot decide if that's for me or not though. Since it is surrounded by dark trees I think it would look REALLY cool to get a similar color going and keep the "tropical rain forest" theme going that I am shooting for. Since I live in Chicago my yard is really cool to have with those trees opposed to the urban landscape everywhere else. Let me know what you guys think! I am going to post a picture of the backyard below and try to mark where I am planning to assemble it (backyard still a work in progress).

Also please note that I have not assembled it yet just because it will be a lot easier to sand, burn, stain, varnish, dissembled.



At night time I put lights around the trees. It looks really cool and this bar will be a great addition. Right now I have an old indoor bar out there that just doesn't look good.










[ This Message was edited by: freestylpolaris 2014-07-18 09:21 ]


 
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freestylpolaris
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Jul 17, 2014
Posts: 23
Posted: 2014-07-18 09:13 am   Permalink

@TikiSkip: That shellac/burn color you provided is EXACTLY what I would like to do. It looks great. You really only got a year out of it before it deteriorated to the picture you provided? Do you think the same would happen to me based on the above post information I provided? If I got 2-3 years before it deteriorated I would be happy. I am going to use spar varnish instead of shellac since shellac is not meant for outdoor use.

This piece of yours below is really similar to what I want. It looks like you just used amber shellac throughout it all and burned the upper,lower, left, and right beams a bit more than the middle paneling. If I burn is it necessary to sand too?




[ This Message was edited by: freestylpolaris 2014-07-18 09:22 ]

[ This Message was edited by: freestylpolaris 2014-07-18 09:26 ]

[ This Message was edited by: freestylpolaris 2014-07-18 09:27 ]

[ This Message was edited by: freestylpolaris 2014-07-18 10:46 ]

[ This Message was edited by: freestylpolaris 2014-07-18 10:51 ]

[ This Message was edited by: freestylpolaris 2014-07-18 11:14 ]


 
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tikiskip
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 26, 2005
Posts: 2834
Posted: 2014-07-18 11:57 am   Permalink

That above was done with new rattan and bamboo.
It will not be the same on yours, but then do a test to see.
For that look do a LITE burn so many times ya see this dark line that's too much burn I think.


"Do you think the same would happen to me based on the above post information I provided? If I got 2-3 years before it deteriorated I would be happy."

I can't say for sure but my guess is that it will turn to s$%t kinda fast,(2years)and you got snow, tree sap, is that a Pine tree?
But do what you think will be the best look for you.
If you put all that money and time into it and it goes bad for the most part you will be back where you started.

And I would do a lite sand then a LITE burn then shellac then do a protective seal on top of shellac.
Do this on a small piece to see if you like, then move on to the rest.

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