FEATURES | MUSIC | BOOKS | DRINKS | FORUMS | GAMES | LINKS | ABOUT


advertise on Tiki Central

Celebrating classic and modern Polynesian Pop
  [Edit Profile]  [Edit Preferences]  [Search] [Sign Up]
[Personal Messages]  [Member List]  [Help/FAQ]  [Rules]  [Login]
Tiki Central Forums Creating Tiki Tiki Carving Bam Bam's carving thread
Bam Bam's carving thread
Bam Bam
Tiki Centralite

Joined: May 13, 2016
Posts: 69
From: NEPA
Posted: 2016-05-17 10:23 pm   Permalink

We have a gnarled Black Locust tree on the corner of the lot that had to be drastically trimmed last winter. Some of the smaller branches are just about dry enough to work, so I thought I'd try my hand at carving my first Tiki! I had a fist-sized chunk of wood set aside specifically for pipemaking, and it seemed logical to combine the two efforts.

I'd not gotten a chance to work with Black Locust before now. I was surprised to find that the thin layer of sapwood was quite fibrous, and reminded me of palm logs I've seen used for carving.



Once you get past the sapwood, the heartwood is a surprisingly intense shade of yellow - and very hard. The change in color helps to offset those parts left from the sapwood even more. Fun fact: the dark heartwood fluoresces a bright neon yellow under UV light.





Once the exterior was finished, I took a blowtorch to the surface and sanded it back to add more color and contrast. Strike me dead if this wood doesn't smell like popcorn when you toast it. Weird wood...






The last steps will involve boring out the bowl and filling any of the deep cracks that run all the way through with JB Weld. More to come!

[ This Message was edited by: Bam Bam 2016-05-30 03:39 ]

[ This Message was edited by: Bam Bam 2016-08-21 08:40 ]


 
View Profile of Bam Bam Send a personal message to Bam Bam      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
hiltiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 10, 2004
Posts: 3776
From: Reseda, calif.
Posted: 2016-05-18 09:22 am   Permalink

Nice first tiki carving. Keep up the good work.

 
View Profile of hiltiki Send a personal message to hiltiki  Goto the website of hiltiki     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
MadDogMike
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Mar 30, 2008
Posts: 8287
From: The Anvil of the Sun
Posted: 2016-05-19 6:13 pm   Permalink

JB Weld? Hmmm... how does that blend with burning tobacco (or whatever you smoke in there)?

 
View Profile of MadDogMike Send a personal message to MadDogMike  Goto the website of MadDogMike     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Bam Bam
Tiki Centralite

Joined: May 13, 2016
Posts: 69
From: NEPA
Posted: 2016-05-19 9:47 pm   Permalink

The pipe is finished!



The bowl is 1 1/8 inch across, and about an inch and a half deep. After several disastrous attempts at drilling out pipe stems for previous projects, I opted to go the Native American / bushpipe route by splitting the stem lengthwise, carving out a channel, and then binding the two halves together with a long strip of leather. The stem was then run under a hot tap to soak the leather, which with any luck will shrink slightly, binding the assembly even tighter.

It smokes reasonably well, despite getting a hot ember sucked into the back of my throat on the first big draw. Now that I've figured out how it likes to be packed, it works pretty well all things considered.

Quote:

On 2016-05-19 18:13, MadDogMike wrote:
JB Weld? Hmmm... how does that blend with burning tobacco (or whatever you smoke in there)?



It's my understanding that it's been an acceptable way to fill interior cracks from a burnout - where you wouldn't want fumes from the Superglue+Sawdust combination commonly used to fill exterior cracks. Supposedly it's pretty inert.

I may not actually fill the cracks, after giving it a test drive. I can't honestly see myself filling the entire bowl (about a quarter-cup!) and there is just enough solid wood at the bottom to fill for an average sit-on-the-back-porch-and-stare-at-the-moon smoke.


 
View Profile of Bam Bam Send a personal message to Bam Bam      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
tikiskip
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 26, 2005
Posts: 4200
Posted: 2016-05-20 04:53 am   Permalink

The pipe stem could be Bamboo.
That would be cool.

Looks great though!
_________________


 
View Profile of tikiskip Send a personal message to tikiskip      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Bam Bam
Tiki Centralite

Joined: May 13, 2016
Posts: 69
From: NEPA
Posted: 2016-05-20 4:02 pm   Permalink

Thanks, Skip! I had considered a bamboo root stem, but there really isn't any readily-available source around here - other than the internet, that is.

I've decided to give the bowl the JB Weld treatment in the end. In the light of day there was heat damage visible that wasn't quite so obvious by porchlight. Evidently, despite being quite a hard wood, locust is quite happy to char relatively easily. I figure: A) There have been resin and high-temp plastic pipe bowls used since the 60's, and B) if you pack correctly and take your time you should never even have hot embers in contact with the walls of the bowl in the first place. cake build-up over time would serve to protect it even more.


 
View Profile of Bam Bam Send a personal message to Bam Bam      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
MadDogMike
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Mar 30, 2008
Posts: 8287
From: The Anvil of the Sun
Posted: 2016-05-22 06:36 am   Permalink

Good info, thanks
Nice pipe!


 
View Profile of MadDogMike Send a personal message to MadDogMike  Goto the website of MadDogMike     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Bam Bam
Tiki Centralite

Joined: May 13, 2016
Posts: 69
From: NEPA
Posted: 2016-05-29 5:35 pm   Permalink

Update:

Turns out I was able to find an easy source of stem-sized bamboo after all - Dollar Tree is selling butterfly nets with thin bamboo handles. Simply cut off the net, drill out the nodes and pith, and hello to the longest pipe stem I've ever used!



I didn't have to torch the stem, since it already had an aged finish. All I had to do was sand off most of the weathered grey surface, slather it in beeswax to fill any splits in the stem, and polish to match the bowl.

I also ended up cutting a small bevel at the back of the bowl to allow it to rest with the stem down. As light as the bamboo is, it still is heavy enough to tip the bowl back.



I think I'm going to call this one finished.
_________________
Wearing Hawaiian since 1988


 
View Profile of Bam Bam Send a personal message to Bam Bam      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
savoy6
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Aug 18, 2008
Posts: 37
Posted: 2016-06-03 12:09 pm   Permalink

very nicely done

 
View Profile of savoy6 Send a personal message to savoy6      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Hami-The-Tiki-Torch
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Sep 07, 2015
Posts: 50
From: T-E-X-A-S
Posted: 2016-07-03 3:47 pm   Permalink

yeah, that's cool...the progression was a cliff hanger!

But alas, enjoyed the conclusion....way cool!
_________________
http://thelavaluau.com/
http://thetikitorchesband.com/


 
View Profile of Hami-The-Tiki-Torch Send a personal message to Hami-The-Tiki-Torch  Email Hami-The-Tiki-Torch Goto the website of Hami-The-Tiki-Torch     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Bam Bam
Tiki Centralite

Joined: May 13, 2016
Posts: 69
From: NEPA
Posted: 2016-08-17 5:10 pm   Permalink

One final touch. I gave it some eyes:



 
View Profile of Bam Bam Send a personal message to Bam Bam      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Bam Bam
Tiki Centralite

Joined: May 13, 2016
Posts: 69
From: NEPA
Posted: 2016-08-21 08:59 am   Permalink

Some new, more experimental carvings - still from pieces of the same Black Locust tree.

First attempt at a Moai. Didn't give myself a lot of depth to work with, so the nose is rather flat. There are also several worm holes passing right through the face, which made for some dangerous moments when the chisel hit the loose pockets of powdered wood.


Tiki #2:
This time I shaved down the rough outer bark and left a layer of the deep red inner bark. It looks almost like burl once it's been oiled. First attempt at cutting behind the teeth. Burned the inside of the mouth with a red hot piece of metal. This branch was covered in lichen, and is much softer than the previous pieces.


Tiki #3:
From the same branch as the previous carving. Mouth fully open. Scorched the entire exterior and sanded it back.



 
View Profile of Bam Bam Send a personal message to Bam Bam      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Bam Bam
Tiki Centralite

Joined: May 13, 2016
Posts: 69
From: NEPA
Posted: 2016-12-17 11:41 am   Permalink

Update: I haven't stopped carving, just stopped taking pictures for a while.

Here's the mini-tikis I've made in the interim. Unfortunately I've discovered my remaining stock is infested with woodworm, so I'll have to find something to use other than this Black Locust.



Also made another (smaller) pipe:




 
View Profile of Bam Bam Send a personal message to Bam Bam      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
U-Moderate:
  
v1.5

[ About Tiki Central | Contact Tiki Central | Advertise on Tiki Central ]
(c) 2000-2016 Tikiroom.com (tm), Tiki Central (tm)

Credits & copyright infomation